Nov 16, 2018  
Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    A-S 1850 - Introduction to the Pre-Health Professions


    The goal of this seminar course is to introduce new Pre-Health Professions students to both the academic aspects of college (via Study Skills Seminars, etc) as well as the pathways towards fields in Healthcare (via panel discussions and a research project). This course prepares students to undertake and successfully manage the challenges and responsibilities of a Pre-Health Professions student. It is intended to (1) enhance students’ academic skills while focusing on engagement and a successful transition to the university setting; (2) focus on enhancing skills that pertain to college life; (3) focus on personal exploration; (4) help students begin to make decisions about their majors and careers, which can be intimidating choices for a first-year student. While it is intended for freshman, all new students are welcome to enroll in the class.

    Credits: 2 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    A-S 3200 - Interinstitutional Study


    Students may take classes at Davenport College, Kalamazoo College, and Kalamazoo Valley Community College through a cooperative program using this course number for credit toward a WMU degree. Information and enrollment forms may be obtained from the Registrar’s Office. Where credit toward the major or minor is desired, prior approval must be obtained from the student’s major and/or minor department.

    Credits: 1 to 12 hours

    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
  
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    A-S 3400 - Sustainable Craft Brewing


    This course is part of the Sustainable Brewing major, allowing students to take experiential courses related to the business, science, and practice of Craft Brewing. Consult a program advisor for additional details.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

    Credits: 1 to 30 hours

    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
  
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    A-S 3499 - Sustainable Brewing Capstone


    This course is designed to serve as the culminating experience for majors in the Sustainable Brewing major. Incorporating the classroom-based and experiential aspects of the curriculum, each student will work individually with a designated faculty member on a semester-long project. Projects will address an issue, challenge, or problem drawn from the external advisory board of industry leaders in sustainable brewing.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior standing, approval of the instructor of record, and a project approval form signed by the student, instructor of record, and the supervising faculty members.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    A-S 3600 - Achieving in Academic English: Emphasis on Reading


    This course is for undergraduates and graduates who are non-native speakers of English and who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their reading and writing skills in order to perform successfully in their academic world. The course promotes further development in the ability to read academic prose and to write in the genres needed for academic success, including the research paper. Attention will be paid to critical reading and editing for grammatical correctness in writing.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Minimum of 500 on TOEFL.

    Credits: 5 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    A-S 3610 - Developing Proficiency in English: Emphasis on Speaking and Listening


    For international students whose interpersonal speaking and listening skills are satisfactory, this course promotes further development of oral language abilities needed for academic success, including group interaction skills. Attention will be paid to developing critical listening and oral presentation skills.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Minimum of 500 on TOEFL.

    Credits: 5 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    A-S 3900 - Arts and Sciences Seminar


    A variable topics course in interdisciplinary studies or other subjects that fall outside the traditional disciplines. May be taken as an elective or for credit in an Arts and Sciences major or minor by special arrangement with the department. Topics will be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated once when topic differs.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Department approval.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

  
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    A-S 3990 - Field Experience (Community Participation)


    A program of independent study combining academic work with social, environmental, civic or political field work.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: A written outline of the student’s project; and Arts and Sciences Advising approval required.

    Credits: 2 to 8 hours

    Notes: May be used as elective credit only. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    A-S 4100 - Climate Change Studies Capstone


    This capstone course is designed to help students reflect, synthesize, and integrate knowledge and experiences within the climate change minor program of study. Students are required to provide evidence (previous work and new essays) in the form of a portfolio that illustrates their achievement in meeting the program learning objectives.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 1 hour

  
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    A-S 4960 - Writing-Intensive Mentored Portfolio


    A student portfolio will be developed in conjunction with a faculty mentor. The faculty mentor will aid the student in the development of the portfolio and will evaluate its contents. The portfolio may be based upon information about their “life experience,” professional experience, credits from professional job training seminars and/or significant classroom projects. The course will include at least four significant writing experiences to meet the Baccalaureate Writing requirement. Mentored Portfolio credit can be used for all or part of the Professional Studies capstone experience. Students are required to seek advising prior to taking their first capstone experience. The course may be repeated for a total of six credit hours. Application forms are available from the College of Arts and Sciences advising office, the advising office at the WMU Regional Locations and on the advising page of the College website www.wmich.edu/cas/advising. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may satisfy the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Department approval.

    Credits: 3 to 6 hours

  
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    A-S 4970 - Mentored Portfolio


    A student portfolio will be developed in conjunction with a faculty mentor. The faculty mentor will aid the student in the development of the portfolio and will evaluate its contents. The portfolio may be based upon information about their “life experience,” professional experience, credits from professional job training seminars and/or significant classroom projects. Mentored Portfolio credit can be used for all or part of the Professional Studies capstone experience. Students are required to seek advising prior to taking their first capstone experience. The course may be repeated for a total of six credit hours. Application forms are available from the College of Arts and Sciences advising office, the advising office at the WMU Regional Locations and on the advising page of the College website www.wmich.edu/cas/advising.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Department approval.

    Credits: 2 to 6 hours

  
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    A-S 4980 - Directed Independent Study


    A program of independent study (reading or research) that allows the student to pursue a subject that falls outside of the traditional disciplines. The initiative for describing the project, planning the method(s) of investigation, determining appropriate product or results, and securing the cooperation of a faculty member to supervise the work must come from the student. Application forms may be picked up in the College of Arts and Sciences Advising Office and must be approved by the Dean of the College. Approval is contingent on the merit of the proposal. Repeatable up to the maximum of 6 credit hours.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Department approval.

    Credits: 1 to 6 hours

  
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    A-S 4990 - Cooperative Education and Practical Training


    Cooperative education, internship or practical training experience during a semester involves full-time planned and supervised work related to the student’s major or minor and is performed outside the department, unit or university. This work is to be summarized in a written report. Students enrolled in this course will be classified as having full-time student status for the purpose of loan deferments and insurance eligibility. Students may take up to a maximum of 6 credit hours in A-S 4990.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  Departmental approval.

    Credits: 1 - 6 hours

    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
  
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    A-S 5100 - Topics in Legal Studies


    This course is part of the accelerated law program run collaboratively with the College of Arts and Sciences and the WMU Thomas Cooley Law School, allowing students to take courses through the Law School that are also included in the accelerated program. Consult a program advisor for additional details.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

    Credits: 1 to 18 hours

    Notes: May be repeated for credit. Open to upperclass and graduate students.
  
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    ACTY 2000 - Careers in Accounting


    This course is designed to help student explore and manage the professional expectations and career potential of the accounting major. Students will be introduced to the various opportunities in public accounting, private accounting and government accounting. Students will participate in resume building activities, pre-interview research, practice interviews, and career management strategies. Students will learn about Broncojobs and internship opportunities as ways to prepare for successful transitions from Western Michigan University to their professional career.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Corequisite: ACTY 2100

    Credits: 1 hour

    Notes: Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.
    When Offered: Fall and Spring
  
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    ACTY 2100 - Principles of Accounting I


    This is an introductory course in accounting, which includes an examination of the recording and reporting of business transactions, and the measurement of business income, assets, liabilities and equities. Emphasis is placed on financial reporting for decision-makers inside the organization.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ACTY 2110 - Principles of Accounting II


    A study of the role of accounting information in the planning and decision-making of business organizations. The course focuses on financial analysis, manufacturing cost flows, budgeting, and planning for long-term financing and investing activities.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ACTY 2100 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ACTY 3100 - Financial Accounting I


    This course examines the underlying concepts of financial accounting. It reviews the accounting cycle, related accounting records, and the financial statements. Accounting principles and reporting requirements for current assets, plant and equipment, intangibles, and other assets are also studied.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites:  ACTY 2100 and 2110 with a grade of 2.5 (“CB”) or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to the following: minors in Accountancy; or majors in Accountancy, General Business, or Integrated Supply Management.

  
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    ACTY 3110 - Financial Accounting II


    This course is a continuation of Accounting 3100. Accounting principles and reporting requirements for liabilities, long-term investments, and stockholders’ equity are studied. Other topics included are accounting for pensions, income taxes, leases, accounting changes, and the Statement of Cash Flows.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ACTY 3100 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to the following: minors in Accountancy; or majors in Accountancy or General Business.

  
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    ACTY 3130 - Accounting Information Systems


    This is an introductory survey course in accounting information systems. It includes consideration of issues such as transaction processing and transaction processing cycles, the use and effects of computers and other relevant technology on accounting, database and file systems, internal accounting and administrative controls, and information technology audits. The course emphasizes use of common business software, which may include spreadsheets, flowcharting software, communications, general ledger, and database management systems.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ACTY 3100 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to the following: minors in Accountancy; or majors in Accountancy or General Business.

  
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    ACTY 3220 - Managerial Accounting - Concepts and Practices


    A study of the accounting methodology and concepts that have been developed to serve managers in decision-making for planning and control. This course covers budgeting, standard cost variance analysis, incremental analysis, cost and profit analysis, relevant costing, and product costing concepts and practices.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ACTY 2100 and ACTY 2110 with a grade of 2.5 (“CB”) or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to the following: minors in Accountancy; or majors in Accountancy, General Business, Management, Integrated Supply Management or Public Administration: Business.

  
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    ACTY 3240 - Introductory Tax Accounting


    A study of the federal tax laws that apply to business entities. The course focuses on concepts of income, deductions, and credits that apply to all reporting entities and emphasizes tax planning as well as tax compliance.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites:  ACTY 2100 and ACTY 2110 with a grade of 2.5 (“CB”) or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to the following: minors in Accountancy; or majors in Accountancy, Personal Finance Planning or Public Administration: Business.

  
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    ACTY 3990 - Sustainability Accounting


    This course provides students with an understanding of how accounting information and reporting is essential for sustainable operations. Accounting information forms the basis for evaluating the ability of an organization to address current business needs, successfully develop a long-term strategy and manage risk for all products, systems, supply chains, and processes to preserve resources for future generations. Topics covered may include: financial statements understanding and analysis; short-term budgeting and control for economic sustainability; evaluation of sustainable projects using capital budgeting techniques, considering potential tax credits and externality costs; short-term sustainable decision making; mandatory accounting and reporting of environmental contingencies; activity based and life cycle costing of sustainable operations. Conventional cost and managerial accounting concepts are discussed, with a focus on sustainability issues.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor approval; MATH 1100 and STAT 3660 with a minimum grade of “C” or better in any prerequisite.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Not for accounting credit.
  
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    ACTY 4100 - Internship in Accounting


    Under the direction of a faculty coordinator, students obtain full-time, accounting-related employment. Participation is limited to available internships and competitive selection by the faculty coordinator and prospective employers. Students are required to write a final report. Each employer will provide an evaluation of the student. A student must be enrolled in ACTY 4100 while meeting the requirements of the course. This course must be taken on a credit/no credit basis and does not count toward the accounting major.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Written approval of the faculty coordinator.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

  
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    ACTY 4110 - Advanced Accounting


    The study of entities and special transactions not covered in Financial Accounting I and II. Particular emphasis is given to partnership equity accounting, governmental accounting, business combinations, reporting by parent-subsidiary consolidated entities (including foreign subsidiaries), and accounting for foreign currency transactions.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ACTY 3110 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to minors or majors in Accountancy.

  
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    ACTY 4130 - Advanced Accounting Systems


    This course examines the types of accounting systems used by business enterprises. It includes in-depth examinations of database accounting systems, including the analysis of information, database design and implementation, and the creation of applications.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ACTY 3130 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to minors or majors in Accountancy.

  
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    ACTY 4140 - Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting


    A comprehensive study of the recording of transactions by governmental units and the financial statements required by generally accepted accounting principles for governmental units. Governmental units are the basic unit of study; however, colleges and universities, healthcare entities, and other not-for-profit organizations are given brief coverage to illustrate accounting and financial reporting for all not-for-profit entities.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ACTY 2110 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to the following: minors in Accountancy; or majors in Accountancy or Public Administration: Business.

  
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    ACTY 4160 - Auditing


    A study of auditing of business and non-business organizations. Topics include audit risk, audit procedures during the planning and performance phase of an audit, internal control concepts, ethics and the legal environment, statistical audit tools, types of audit reports, auditing standards, and the relationship of internal auditing to financial statement auditing.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ACTY 3110 and 3130 with a grade of “C” or better in both.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to minors or majors in Accountancy.

  
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    ACTY 4220 - Cost Accounting - Theory and Practice


    A study of the use of cost accounting information within a planning and control framework. Topics include the information needs of managers, costing of products and services, cost allocations among departments of an enterprise, activity-based costing, the theory of constraints, cost of quality, budgeting, income effects of absorption and variable costing, transfer pricing, and performance measurement.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ACTY 3220 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to minors or majors in Accountancy.

  
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    ACTY 4240 - Advanced Tax Accounting


    A study of the federal tax laws that govern the transactions during a corporation’s life cycle. The tax effects of organizing, operating, making distributions, reorganizing, and liquidating corporations are analyzed. The differences in the taxation of corporations, partnerships, and limited liability companies also are addressed.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ACTY 3240 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to minors or majors in Accountancy.

  
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    ACTY 4310 - Special Topics in Accountancy


    The study of special topics within the discipline of accountancy.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: ACTY 3100 with a grade of “C” or better, or Department Chair approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to minors or majors in Accountancy.

    Notes: Repeatable for credit under different topics.
  
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    ACTY 4320 - Special Topics in Accountancy


    The study of special topics within the discipline of accountancy.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: ACTY 3100 with a grade of “C” or better, or Department Chair approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to minors or majors in Accountancy.

    Notes: Repeatable for credit under different topics.
  
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    ACTY 4330 - Special Topics in Accountancy


    The study of special topic within the discipline of accountancy.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: ACTY 3100 with a grade of “C” or better, or Department Chair approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to minors or majors in Accountancy.

    Notes: Repeateable for credit under different topics.
  
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    ACTY 5980 - Readings in Accounting


    Directed individual study of topics not covered in other departmental courses.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to majors in Accountancy.

    Notes: Open to upperclass and graduate students.
  
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    ADA 2250 - Drug Use: Personal and Social Impact


    This course is designed to increase understanding of substance abuse, alcohol and other drug use through the public health disease model with an emphasis on psychological, physiological and social consequences of use and abuse. An overview of prevention, case finding and treatment strategies are provided.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area VIII: Health and Well-Being.
  
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    ADA 3300 - Addiction and the Addiction Process


    This foundational course will focus on the various models and theories of addiction as well as the behavioral, psychological, physical, and social effects of substance abuse. In addition, students will be provided an overview of the various medical and mental health conditions that may mimic or coexist with addiction.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ADA 3360 - Clinical Approaches to Substance Use Disorders


    This course examines the various aspects of substance use disorder treatment processes and interventions. Students will learn about the development of an individualized treatment plan through the screening and intake process that addresses an identified substance use disorder, as well as other issues related to treatment progress. The importance of referral and service coordination with civic groups, agencies, and other professional or governmental entities to help address the individual’s needs is also addressed. Students will gain an understanding and an appreciation of the contributions of various addiction counseling models as they apply to modalities of care for individuals, groups, families, couples, and significant others.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ADA 3370 - Substance Abuse Treatment Strategies


    This course will introduce students to a variety of helping strategies to use with substance abuse clients. The course will focus on treatment services, medical and pharmacological resources, and crisis management.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ADA 3380 - Addiction Assessment, Recovery, and Illness Management


    This course will introduce students to different philosophies, procedures, policies, and outcomes most generally accepted for the treatment, recovery, relapse prevention and continuing care of addiction. There will also be a strong focus on how to include all resources within an individual’s life system to help them with their addictions.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ADA 5200 - Family and Addiction


    This course provides students with knowledge on the effects of substance abuse on the family. Included is theory and practice regarding dysfunctional relationships, children of substance abusers, and resulting disorders.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Open to upperclass and graduate students.
  
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    ADA 5370 - Constructive Confrontation and Referral in Substance Abuse Services


    This course provides students with knowledge of intervention strategies for active substance abusers. Emphasis is placed on strategic constructive confrontation techniques and effective referral processes.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Open to upperclass and graduate students.
  
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    ADA 5650 - Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence


    This course provides the student with knowledge of the multiple relationships of substance abuse and violence.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Open to upperclass and graduate students.
  
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    ADA 5700 - Field Education: Substance Abuse


    A clinical, prevention, research, or administrative field experience meeting practice requirements in certification of substance abuse services. The field experience involves direct supervision by faculty and clinical supervisors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Admission to certificate program and permission of instructor.

    Credits: 1 to 6 hours

    Notes: Open to upperclass and graduate students. Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis. Students should enroll in ADA 5700 only if they are also concurrently enrolled in an internship with another WMU master’s degree program. The site must be approved by the SPADA field coordinator.
  
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    ADA 5980 - Readings in Substance Abuse Services


    Individualized, independent study and readings under guidance of a faculty member. Initiative for planning topic for investigation and seeking the faculty member comes from the student with consultation of the advisor.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Instructor and program advisor approval.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

    Notes: Open to upperclass and graduate students.
  
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    AE 2610 - Introduction to Aerospace Engineering


    An overview of aerospace engineering disciplines; the history of aerospace, fundamental elements of aerodynamics and astrodynamic experiments, airfoils and wings, performance, stability and control, propulsion, and structures leading toward the aerospace vehicle conceptual design.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Phys 2050 with a grade of “C” or better (may be taken concurrently).

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course restricted to pre-aerospace engineering students.

    When Offered: Spring
  
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    AE 3610 - Aerodynamics I


    A study of incompressible aerodynamics of flight vehicles with emphasis on the combined application of the basic theory and experiments for solving practical aerodynamic problems in the design of flight vehicles. Flow similarity, governing equations, potential flows, thin airfoil theory, lifting line theory, and basic aerodynamic measurement techniques.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: MATH 2720, (AE 2610 or ME 3560), PHYS 2050; PHYS 2060; with a grade of “C” or better in all prerequisites.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    AE 3710 - Aerodynamics II


    An introduction to compressible aerodynamics and boundary layer theory, including subsonic and supersonic flows over wings and bodies and viscous flows. Emphasis is placed on application of the basic theory for solving practical aerodynamic problems in the design of flight vehicles.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: AE 3610; MATH 3740; ME 2580; with a grade of “C” or better in all prerequisites.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Spring
  
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    AE 3800 - Flight Vehicle Performance


    A study of flight vehicle performance with an emphasis on the effect of aerodynamics on vehicle design. Computer applications to the solution of the problems of flight vehicle performance.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: AE 3710, may be taken concurrently.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    AE 4590 - Flight Test Engineering and Design


    Analysis and design of in-flight experiments, excluding expansion of the aircraft’s flight envelope. Includes microprocessor based data acquisition system and electronic sensor interfacing. Laboratory projects emphasize the pre-test, flight and post-flight phases of flight testing with an emphasis on safety of flight issues.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: AE 4600

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (1 - 6)
    When Offered: Spring
  
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    AE 4600 - Aircraft Stability and Control


    A study of fixed wing aircraft stability and control; estimation of fixed wing stability and control derivatives, longitudinal and lateral/directional static stability and control analysis and synthesis. Introduction to dynamic stability and control characteristics including stability and mode shapes, responses to control input, and handling/flying qualities.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: AE 3710 and ME 3600.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course restricted to majors in aerospace engineering or aeronautical engineering.

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    AE 4630 - Aerospace Structural Design


    Structural design of aircraft and spacecraft emphasizing structural integrity under imposed static and dynamic loads. Design considerations include weight, cost, and mission constraints.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ME 2570 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Spring
  
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    AE 4660 - Aerospace Propulsion I


    Thermodynamics and fluid dynamics of aeronautical rotating turbomachines, including axial turbines, compressors, mixed flow, and centrifugal machines. Analytical and computational methods will be used to design and determine performance of aircraft propulsion systems.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ME 2320; and either (ME 3560 or AE 3710).

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course restricted to majors in aerospace engineering or aeronautical engineering.

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    AE 4690 - Aircraft Design


    Conceptual and preliminary design of aircraft emphasizing performance, stability and control, and total vehicle efficiency.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: AE 3800 and AE 4600, with a grade of “C” or better in all prerequisites.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course acts as the capstone design course for the BS Aerospace Engineering program.
    When Offered: Spring
  
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    AE 4700 - Orbital Mechanics


    Introduction to astrodynamics, including the two-body problem and restricted three-body problem, orbital trajectories, transfers and targeting, and orbit determination. Computer modeling and simulation of orbital trajectories.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ME 2580, with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    AE 4760 - Aerospace Propulsion II


    Analysis of liquid and solid propellant rocket engines, propellant thermochemistry and storage, system considerations such as heat transfer and material properties, multi-stage rockets, and trajectories in powered flight. Introduction of electric propulsion and advanced propulsion concepts.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: AE 4660, with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course restricted to majors in aerospace engineering, aeronautical engineering or mechanical engineering.

  
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    AE 4950 - Topics in Aerospace Engineering


    A specialized course dealing with a particular area of aerospace engineering not included in other course offerings.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

    Credits: 1 to 6 hours

    Restrictions: This course restricted to majors in aerospace engineering.

    Notes: May be repeated for credit with a different topic for up to a total of six credits.
  
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    AE 4990 - Independent Study


    An independent study assignment available only by special arrangement with an instructor and approved by the department curriculum committee. A written report will be required and filed with the department on completion.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

    Credits: 1 to 6 hours

    Restrictions: This course restricted to majors in aerospace engineering.

    Notes: May be repeated for up to a total of six hours.
    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II
  
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    AE 5100 - Foundations of Structural Mechanics


    Fundamental analysis techniques for aerospace structures. Analysis of stress and strain including linear elastic anisotropic materials. Multi-axial yield. Boundary value problems and an introduction to variational calculus. Energy methods for structural analysis including minimum potential. Castigliano’s theorems and other approximate methods.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: AE 4630 with a grade of “C” or better; or graduate standing.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Open to upperclass and graduate students.
  
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    AE 5200 - Advanced Aerodynamics


    Fundamental mathematical skills in vector analysis and perturbation methods. Theoretical studies of thin airfoils, finite wings, wing-body and vorticities. Low and high Reynolds aerodynamics. Boundary layer and viscous flow control. High lift aerodynamics. V/STOL and UAV Aerodynamics.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: AE 3710 with a grade of “C” or better, or instructor approval; or graduate standing.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Open to upperclass and graduate students.
  
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    AE 5400 - Aerospace Vehicle Dynamics


    Three-dimensional kinematics and dynamics with a focus on aerospace vehicles. Newton/Euler and Lagrangian formulations for systems of particles and rigid bodies. Translating and rotating reference frames. Aircraft static stability, aircraft equations of motion, orbital mechanics for the two-body problem, spacecraft rotational dynamics.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Open to upperclass and graduate students.
  
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    AE 5760 - Advanced and Electric Propulsion Systems


    Introduction to electric propulsion with an overview of electricity and magnetism, atomic physics, non-equilibrium flows and electrothermal, electromagnetic, and electrostatic electric propulsion systems. Brief introduction to other types of advanced propulsion methods.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: AT 4760 with a grade of “C” or better, or instructor approval; or graduate standing.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Open to upperclass and graduate students.
  
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    AE 5950 - Topics in Aerospace Engineering


    A specialized course dealing with some particular area of aerospace engineering not included in other course offerings.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Open to upperclass and graduate students.
  
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    AFS 2000 - Introduction and Foundations to Africana Studies


    Provides an overview of the origins of black people, the philosophical underpinnings of the discipline, the evolution of the field of Africana Studies, its theoretical and practical applications, and the holistic method of studying African peoples and their social evolution. Historically oriented, the course is designed to be interpretive rather than chronological. The course covers the African civilization in the western hemisphere, including the United States, folklore, mythology, customs, rise of Black nationalism, role of black consciousness, and present day alternatives.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
  
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    AFS 2100 - Comparative Approaches to Forms of Black Consciousness


    This course focuses on the history of Black consciousness in the African Diaspora from the seventeenth to twentieth century. It is concerned with forms of Black expression and social action as they are manifested in specific historical, cultural, and political contexts using comparative approaches. Some of the themes include Africa in African American thought and culture, naming and identity, feminism and gender, movement and migration, and the rhetoric of freedom in Black ideology.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences.
  
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    AFS 2800 - Topics and Themes in Africana Studies


    This course builds upon the African diaspora experiences through selected topics and themes that address complex social and historical issues such as gender, politics, economics, slavery, civil/human rights, affirmative action, sexual identity/orientation, lynching, genocide, gentrification, cultural mutilation, and modes of cultural production. The course will interrogate theories of ethnicity, diversity, multiculturalism, colonialism/post-colonialism, modernism/post-modernism, structuralism/post-structuralism in tandem with the proposed topic(s) and theme(s) being examined.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisies General Education Area II: humanities. This course is repeatable under a different topic.
  
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    AFS 3000 - Black Experience: From the African Beginnings to 1865


    This course will examine the myriad patterns of adaptation and adjustments made by the enslaved Africans and free people of color to the continuing oppressive character of American Society prior to 1865. Slave narratives and abolitionists tracts written by freed people reveal much about the African-Americans’ interpretation of their presence in the New World. The Black presence created a commonality of experience, the characteristics of which became and remain a distinctive American co-culture. It aims to examine how the Black presence altered the idea of race and how this alteration became a function of the institutional forms that Black Americans have shaped to survive in a hostile environment.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
  
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    AFS 3010 - Black Experience: From 1866 to the Present


    The Black Experience 1866 to the present will concentrate on the plight of the newly freed African-American. The development of the family in post bellum years, the Euro-American reaction to the change in status, the rise of pseudo scientific racist thought, the long-term psychological effects of slavery on both the victims and the victimizers, the search and the rise of Black Messianic leaders, the migration from the rural-agricultural South to the urban-industrialized North, the emergence of Black Nationalism-Civil Rights Movement and the non-Black backlash. AFS 3000 is highly recommended.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
  
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    AFS 3100 - The Black Woman: Historical Perspective and Contemporary Status


    This course is an examination of the historical perspective and contemporary status of the Black woman and her story, paying critical attention to her image as reflected in her role in the American society. The course emphasizes the problems, issues, and concerns of the Black woman. Students will participate in securing visiting Black female speakers and documenting their story as Black women.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
  
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    AFS 3140 - The Black Community


    An investigation of the social forms and structures within the Black community from the unique Black perspective. The course will focus on the sociological, political, economic, psychological, and physical aspects of community building by a subordinated group.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
  
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    AFS 3900 - Women Writers in Contemporary Black Literature from the 19th Century to the Present


    An interdisciplinary course that focuses attention on the creative and critical writing by major women writers from Africa, the U.S., and the Caribbean. It meets a need for majors in Africana Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, and English.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
  
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    AFS 4650 - Internship in Africana Studies


    Students will participate in an internship/practicum where their knowledge will be put directly into practice. They will be led through this experience with a seminar led by an approved faculty member from the AFS core faculty and, where appropriate, a person from the student’s disciplinary major department.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 15 credit hours in the AFS major. Call number obtained from AFS administrative assistant.

    Credits: 3 to 6 hours

    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
  
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    AFS 4980 - Directed Independent Study


    A program of independent study, directed by an approved AFS faculty member, that allows the student to pursue readings relating to the Black Experience not dealt with in other courses. The initiative for describing the project, planning the method(s) of investigation, determining the appropriate results, and securing the cooperation of a faculty member to advise the work must come from the student. Applications are available in the AFS office and must be approved by the director.

    Credits: 1 to 6 hours

  
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    ANTH 1100 - Lost Worlds and Archaeology


    An introduction to the archaeological record relating to the development of culture from its stone age origins through the development of village agriculture and the beginnings of urban life.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
  
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    ANTH 1200 - Peoples of the World


    A survey of the rich variety and range of non-Western peoples throughout the world, with emphasis on the role of culture in shaping human thought and behavior.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
  
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    ANTH 1500 - Race, Biology, and Culture


    This course is an introduction to the anthropological study of human biological variation in modern populations. We will examine from a biocultural perspective how human populations adapt to life in difficult environments (e.g., tropics, high altitude, arctic) and in so doing, we will explore the biological and social meanings of human racial variation.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area VII: Natural Science and Technology: Applications and Implications.
  
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    ANTH 2100 - Introduction to Archaeology


    The science of archaeology is explored in terms of the methods and concepts used to discover and interpret past human behavior. Select portions of the Old and New World prehistoric cultural sequences provide the frame of reference.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences.
    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ANTH 2400 - Principles of Cultural Anthropology


    An introduction to the basic concepts, theoretical approaches, and methodological strategies employed in the study of traditional and contemporary sociocultural systems throughout the world. Attention given to research techniques and the insights derived from detailed case studies and cross-cultural comparisons.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences.
    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ANTH 2500 - Introduction to Biological Anthropology


    A survey of physical anthropology; evolutionary theory; hominid and primate evolution; the living primates, human osteology, human genetics and population variation.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area VI: Natural Science with Laboratory.
    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ANTH 2510 - Forensic Anthropology


    This course introduces the fundamentals of forensic anthropology, an applied field of anthropology involved in the recovery, identification, and assessment of human skeletal/dental remains in a medico-legal context. We survey the basics of identifying bones of the human skeleton, forensic science method and theory, and research methods.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area VII: Natural Science and Technology: Applications and Implications.
  
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    ANTH 2600 - Sex, Gender, Culture


    Sexual differences around the world are culturally elaborated into gender-specific behaviors, normed relations between gender-coded people and objects, and various ideologies supporting the differences. In this course, biological and cross-cultural data will be used to explore the foundation of this process and the social, cultural, and psychological consequences of gender coding on men and women in different cultural settings.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
  
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    ANTH 2800 - Language in a Global World


    This introductory course in linguistic anthropology presents languages and speech practices around the world as cultural phenomena. The lecture component covers a sampling of topics and approaches to studying language as cultural practice, including cases from U.S. society and from diverse language communities around the world and considering contemporary issues including language rights, language shift, bilingual education, and language revitalization. The lab component allows students to develop an understanding of basic linguistic principles and apply linguistic and discourse analyses to diverse cross-cultural examples.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences.
  
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    ANTH 3010 - Anthropology through Film


    Anthropology through Film is designed to introduce students to the concepts, methods, and practices of cultural anthropology through the viewing and analysis of ethnographic films and the reading of select ethnographic writings. A principal course objective is to learn how to analyze what the filmmaker has done well and what is lacking in the ethnographer’s portrayal of other cultures. Consequently, more general issues of representing other cultures will be considered in relation to the themes of power, the legacy of colonialism, and the world economic system.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ANTH 3030 - Historical Archaeology


    Investigates the role of the material world in the colonial encounter and the development of capitalism. The course will integrate theoretical, methodological and substantive issues with an emphasis, though not exclusive focus, on North America. Prerequisite: ANTH 2100 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ANTH 3060 - Archaeology of Civilization


    The course discusses the forces leading to the rise of the state and the emergence of centers of civilization. It investigates state emergence cross-culturally, examining shared characteristics and innovative pathways, social accomplishments and social costs, New World and Old World, far-flung and more recent past.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2100 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ANTH 3090 - Archaeology of Inequality and Resistance


    The course examines the dynamics of historical and archaeologically known forms of control and domination based upon status, class, gender, and ethnicity. The course focuses on the social relation of oppressor and oppressed, the ideologies of control and the forms of social resistance.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2100 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ANTH 3390 - Cultures of Latin America


    This course offers an introduction to contemporary life in Latin America from an ethnographic perspective. Readings and class discussions will highlight the intersections of colonialism, nationalism and globalization among selected groups in different areas in the region. By locating contemporary societies within broader contexts this class aims to replace cultural stereotypes with anthropological analysis.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
  
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    ANTH 3400 - Cultures of Asia


    This course will provide an introduction to contemporary cultures and societies of Asia. Emphasis will be placed on topics such as education, family, workplaces, gender, popular culture, and identity. By locating contemporary institutions and idioms within a historical context, this class aims to replace cultural stereotypes with anthropological analysis.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
  
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    ANTH 3410 - Global Africa Past and Present


    This course offers an introduction to the study of contemporary life in sub-Saharan Africa. Students will engage with issues relating to colonialism, post-colonialism, and globalization as they explore several regions and ethnic groups in depth. A special emphasis will be placed on recognizing and dispelling long-held myths and negative stereotypes about Africa.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
  
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    ANTH 3440 - The First Americans


    Examines indigenous or native cultures of North America from the initial peopling of the continent by immigrants from Asia during the Terminal Pleistocene (Ice Ages) into the period of European exploration and colonization. Selected topics illustrating the ingenuity and diversity of human responses to both changing landscapes and social circumstances over time and in space will be presented.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
  
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    ANTH 3450 - Topics in Anthropology


    An intensive study of selected topics or emerging fields in anthropology. Topics will vary and be announced each semester. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ANTH 3470 - Ethnicity/Multiculturalism


    A study of the diverse perspectives of the many different ethnic groups in the United States. In the course we will analyze the social tensions, group dynamics, and consequences resulting from the cultural and ethnic diversity existing here. Some of the discussion will focus on the medical, legal, social, and political institutions that exist in a multicultural environment.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
  
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    ANTH 3480 - Gender and Plastic Bodies


    In U.S. society we tend to assume that there are two sexes - male and female. Even if we have learned that gender roles can change, as in expecting men to be more nurturing while more and more women pursue careers for example, we tend to accept that this is simply social change based on natural sexes. In this course we will focus on the United States with some cross-cultural comparisons in order to question this assumption of “natural” sexes as we explore physiological variations as they are culturally interpreted and understood and cultural interventions of “natural” sex. Thus, based on work in our own society and cross-culturally, we will focus our attention at and beyond the limits of sex and gender, examining: (1) the ways in which human societies interpret physiological variation; (2) transgender experiences and categories as they vary cross-culturally; (3) and the role of technology in (re)shaping the “natural” sexes. Whether we are considering cyborg bodies, virtual bodies, tattooed and pierced bodies, or bodies surgically altered in a stunning variety of ways, we will be asking what is “natural” and “unnatural” about the assumed biological categories of male and female.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
  
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    ANTH 3510 - Human Osteology


    A study of the human skeleton. Emphasis will be on morphological and metrical variation, odontology, palaeopathology, and reconstruction of the individual and the population.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2500 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ANTH 3530 - Bioarchaeology


    This course introduces students to the biocultural, interdisciplinary and integrative study of human remains recovered from archaeological contexts. Students will examine the reconstruction of skeletal populations for patterns of subsistence, stress, disease, paleodemography, biological relatedness, occupational indicators, trauma, and warfare. Students will learn how to recognize the manifestations of these patterns on human remains, and will be able to describe and critique the methods used by bioarchaeologists to gather and interpret information from human skeletal data.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ANTH 2100 or ANTH 2500, or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which satisfies the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.
  
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    ANTH 3540 - Growth and Development


    Descriptive, analytical, and evolutionary approaches to the study of the physical growth and development of humans. Postnatal growth, endocrinology of growth, dental and skeletal development, and human diversity will all be explored from an anthropological and an evolutionary perspective.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ANTH 3560 - Food and Culture


    Are we what we eat or how we eat? How do we determine what is food and is not food? This course will examine food cross-culturally and explore the different ways in which human beings produce, distribute, consume and think about food. Special consideration will be given to issues such as the origins of food surpluses and famines, the emergence of global food commodity chains, and the rise of the organic industry.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ANTH 3580 - The African Diaspora: Peoples and Cultures


    The African Diaspora in the Americas, product of the transatlantic slave trade, has impacted every society in North America, the Caribbean, and Central and South America and has produced a diverse array of distinctive cultures and communities. And yet, the communities, cultures, and cultural influences of the African Diaspora are often neglected within the usual regional divisions of area studies courses, despite a solid tradition of anthropology dealing with the peoples and cultures of the African Diaspora. This body of research raises many issues at the cutting edge of anthropological thinking about the nature of cultural continuity and change, identity, consciousness and tradition, and the co-construction of race and nation, to list but a few. This course will introduce the work of pioneering anthropologists of the African Diaspora throughout the Americas, situating their work in the context of various intellectual and political currents of the 20th century, and tracing their legacy in contemporary anthropology and related fields, such as cultural studies and ethnohistory. Much of this recent work reconceptualizes an Atlantic World or “Black Atlantic” that is rich with contemporary interconnections and movements of people between points in the Americas, Europe, and Africa that complicate earlier notions of unidirectional influences from Africa to the New World. We will attempt to map a dialogue between anthropological work on African diasporic culture(s) (situated within the predominately white/Euro academy) and the political and social concerns and consciousness of Afro-American people themselves (not just U.S. African-American, but all of the Americas).

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations. Cross-listed with AFS 3580.
  
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    ANTH 4040 - Early Technologies


    This course deals with the analysis and interpretation of early technologies and technological organization and their relationship to social, political, and economic dimensions of cultural systems.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2100 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ANTH 4400 - Ethnography


    Examines various methods, problems, and issues in ethnographic research and writing, as well as the interaction between ethnographic practice and the development of anthropological theory. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2400 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ANTH 4500 - Primate Behavior and Ecology


    An advanced survey of the primates. Topics include: primate characteristics; taxonomy, constraints of body size on locomotion and diet; and primate social behavior in an ecological context. The behavioral ecology of individual species will be explored through readings, films, and when possible, direct behavior observation at a zoo.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2500 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

 

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