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    Western Michigan University
   
 
  Dec 13, 2017
 
 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2017-18

Global and International Studies Program


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Susan Pozo, Director
Main Office, 2047 Moore Hall
(269) 387-5653
www.wmich.edu/globalstudies

One of the three pillars of our university’s vision seeks to be “globally engaged”. Global and international studies offers a broad, integrative approach to the study of global and international issues. The program is supported by the methods and theories of different disciplines, by language study, and through regional area expertise. It houses a family of interdisciplinary focus fields devoted to the study of global and international issues and major regions and cultures of the world, offering one undergraduate major and four minors. Course offerings for these programs are primarily in the College of Arts and Sciences, although other colleges may provide appropriate courses.

The global and international studies major is also designed to maximize opportunities for international study abroad and academic experiences outside of the United States. Extensive world language study is required in the major; and, although the minors can be completed without world language courses, most students include some in their programs, as appropriate. With advisor approval, courses taken at colleges and universities through study abroad, either in English or in other languages, may be integrated into the program requirements.

Students completing this major often seek employment in international business, government service or work with international organizations. Many students seek a second major with a world language.

Our minor programs include:

  • Asian studies
  • Global and international studies
  • Latin American studies
  • Modern European studies

Students interested in area studies minors may also be interested in the Canadian studies minor offered through the Department of World Languages and Literatures.

Advising
Given the interdisciplinary nature of the program, it is very important that students work regularly with program advisors. Information about career choices, internships, graduate programs and second majors is also available from our office.

Academic Standards
Students must earn at least a grade of “C” in all courses counted for their major/minor.

Baccalaureate Writing Requirement
Students who have chosen a global and international studies major will satisfy the Baccalaureate Writing Requirement by successfully completing GIST 4900 - Senior Capstone Seminar in Global and International Studies.

Global and International Studies Major (39 hours)


Program requirements


  1. Minimum 39 hours, of which at least 23 hours must be in course work at the 3000-level or above
  2. Three courses from a set of eight core courses (15-18 hours)
  3. Selection of a focus field and a minimum of four courses in that focus field (12-16 hours)
  4. Completion of two courses in a world language beyond the 2010 level (6-8 hours)
    Note: Courses taught in English cannot be used to satisfy this requirement
  5. At least one area studies course on a region in which the selected world language is spoken (3 hours)
  6. A study abroad, service learning or internship cognate (3-4 hours)
  7. Must include course selections from at least four different departments or course prefixes
  8. No more than 16 credit hours of transfer credit may be applied toward the major

No minor is required for students choosing the major, although a language or area studies minor is strongly recommended. Credits for the world language cognate requirement can also be applied toward a declared minor or major in a language.

Note:


The Senior Capstone Seminar in Global and International Studies (GIST 4900) will also be used to satisfy the University’s baccalaureate-level writing requirement.

Focus field (12-16 hours)


Students will take four courses in a single focus field. Course listed in each focus field represent only a sample of courses available. Courses other than those listed for the focus fields must be used with advisor approval.

Identities and cultures in a globalized world


Explores issues of race, religion, nationality, ethnicity and gender. Considers the role identities play in shaping national and international ideas, actions, conflicts and policies. The following courses should be considered as options for discussion with an advisor.

States, security, and transnational governance


Explores the ways that the international states system, international non-governmental organizations, and other transnational organizations address the intersection between local and global issues. The following courses should be considered as options for discussion with an advisor.

Inequality and social responsibility


Explores the origins and impact of economic and social disparities and the influences of race, gender and socioeconomic class on resource distributions. It seeks to understand the legal and ethical responses to these social differences, and the challenges it presents for peoples and governments. The following courses should be considered as options for discussion with an advisor.

Global health and environment


Focuses on the linkages between health and the environment and studies the challenges, opportunities and responsibility of sustaining healthy bodies, communities and environments. The following courses should be considered as options for discussion with an advisor.

Migration and population dynamics


Examines the movements of people and explores the economic, social, cultural, ethical, security, and policy ramifications of this mobility. The following courses should be considered as options for discussion with an advisor.

Global communication, expression and information systems


Studies the forms of expression and production and circulation of ideas, images and information from comparative and global perspectives. It explores the role of technology, communication modes and the arts in defining global issues. The following courses should be considered as options for discussion with an advisor.

Self-Designed Focus Field


Offers students the option of arranging a set of courses to develop a thematic focus field. Students must petition the global and international studies program for approval of a self-designated focus field.

Study Abroad, Service Learning or Internship Cognate (3-4 hours)


Students must select an approved experiential learning opportunity, which may include an internship with a global focus or a study abroad program. The following courses may also be used to satisfy this requirement. The advisor may approve an appropriate substitute.

For study abroad programs visit:


http://broncosabroad.international.wmich.edu/

World Language Cognate and Area Studies Requirement (9-12 hours)


The program requires at least two courses beyond the 2010-level in a single language other than the student’s native language and appropriate to the chosen focus field. Courses taught in English cannot satisfy this requirement. Students whose native language is not English should consult the program advisor on fulfillment of the language requirement. The program also requires one area studies course in the region in which the students language choice is spoken. A study abroad program in a region corresponding to the student’s language choice can be used to satisfy this requirement. Students who complete a minor or major in a world language will satisfy this language and area studies cognate.

The following courses should be considered as options for discussion with an advisor.

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