May 30, 2024  
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • CHEG 2810 - Data Acquisition and Handling


    A lecture/laboratory consideration of the methods used to collect experimental or process data, data handling, and data presentation; methods and limitations when applying or collecting process information.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHEG 1810

    Credits: 1 hour

  
  • CHEG 2960 - Material and Energy Balance


    Fundamentals of chemical engineering dealing with behavior of gases, thermophysical properties of solids, liquids and gases, thermochemistry and associated problem solving. Emphasis is on material and energy balances. The laboratory session will be used as a problem solving workshop.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 1100 and PHYS 2050.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Will be offered as honors courses for interested students
    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 - 3)
  
  • CHEG 3100 - Work Experience/Coop


    Full-time employment in chemical process industries that provides first-hand experience in application of chemical engineering principles. A written report at the end of the semester is required.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Departmental consent; junior standing.

    Credits: 1 to 2 hours

  
  • CHEG 3110 - Unit Operations in Chemical Engineering I


    A consideration of the unit operations in the area of fluid mechanics. Emphasis is on principles of fluid mechanics, equipment design, and applications. The laboratory is centered around problem solving, design, and optimization issues. Relevant software will be used in visualizing and solving industrial problems. Laboratory experiments demonstrating various principles and equipment will be conducted.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHEG 2960.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Will be offered as honors courses for interested students
    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • CHEG 3120 - Unit Operations in Chemical Engineering II


    A consideration of the unit operations in the area of heat transfer. Emphasis is on the principles of heat transfer, equipment design, and applications. The laboratory is centered around problem solving, design, and optimization issues. Relevant software will be used in visualizing and solving industrial problems. Laboratory experiments demonstrating various principles and equipment will be conducted.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHEG 3110

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Will be offered as honors courses for interested students
    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • CHEG 3200 - Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics


    A lecture consideration of the fundamental laws and concepts of thermodynamics and how they explain the behavior of matter in its different phases. Special emphasis on application to industrial situations.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 1120 and CHEG 2960.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CHEG 3300 - Mass Transfer


    Fundamentals of diffusional mass balances; diffusion in solids, liquids, and gases. Convective mass transfer; simultaneous heat and mass transfer. Component separation in continuous processes; gas absorption and adsorption; liquid-liquid extraction and distillation.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Corequisites: CHEG 3120 with a grade of “C” or better (may be taken concurrently).

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CHEG 3550 - Bioprocess Engineering


    The extension of chemical engineering fundamentals to biological systems. Topics include: bioreaction engineering, bioseparations, and commercial applications of biomaterials and bioprocesses to societal needs.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  BIOS 1500 and CHEG 2960 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Completion of 1 semester of organic chemistry is highly recommended.
    When Offered: Spring
  
  • CHEG 3810 - Computer Modeling and Simulation - Chemical Processes


    A laboratory class covering usage and application of process simulation packages; module set up, data inputting and optimization techniques.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHEG 2960.

    Credits: 1 hour

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (0 - 3)
  
  • CHEG 4100 - Chemical Reaction Engineering


    Chemical kinetics and equilibria; reaction rate expressions from mechanisms and experimental data; design and analysis of homogeneous flow and batch reactors; heterogeneous reactor design; solid catalyzed reactions.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 4300.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CHEG 4200 - Separation Processes


    Survey of separations based on physical properties, phase equilibria and rate processes. Analysis and modeling of separation processes. Staged and countercurrent operations.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHEG 3300.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • CHEG 4440 - Energy Management Engineering


    Energy systems including combustion processes and steam generation and distribution. Practical issues and equipment used in the energy industry. Energy efficiency, economic operation, and reduction of emissions.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: (CHEG 3120 and 3200) or (ME 4310 and 4320).

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CHEG 4600 - Plant Economics and Project Design


    A lecture and laboratory consideration of: Process synthesis and operability characteristics; dynamics of chemical process industries; project evaluation and review; optimization in design and selection of process and/or equipment alternatives; environmental, health, and safety in the design of chemical processes; basis for cost estimation. Oral and written reports of individual and team efforts. CHEG 4600 is cross-listed with PAPR 4600.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEG 3120, CHEG 3300, and CHEG 3810.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • CHEG 4830 - Process Control I


    Introduction to automatic control covering control methods, theory, loop analysis, and control loop hardware, including sensors, transmitters, controller and control valves. Includes the necessary secondary loop topics such as circuits (RC and RL) and circuit laws.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEG 3120 and PHYS 2070. Corequisite: MATH 3740 (may be taken concurrently).

    Credits: 4 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 - 3)
  
  • CHEG 4870 - Senior Design Project


    Application of chemical engineering to the solution of a complex, open-ended research problem selected in consultation with faculty. The project will involve feasibility analysis, design, and optimization of chemical processes. Emphasis will be on working in small design groups, submission of written report, and oral presentation. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHEG 4600.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Will be offered as honors courses for interested students
  
  • CHEG 4950 - Topics in Chemical Engineering


    A specialized course dealing with a specific area in chemical engineering not included in other course offerings. May be repeated for credit with a different topic up to six hours.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
  • CHEG 4990 - Independent Studies


    A program of independent study in an area arranged in consultation with the instructor. One to three hours per semester, cumulative to six hours.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
  • CHEM 1000 - Introduction to General Chemistry


    A course for students with insufficient background for college level chemistry which develops skills essential to a working understanding of the science of chemistry. Instruction and practice in the fundamental tools for solving chemical problems: chemical formulas, chemical equations, stoichiometry, measurement units, conversions. An introduction to the nature of matter is developed. Enrollment is restricted to students without high school chemistry or to those who demonstrate inadequate retention of their chemistry background. This course credit will not apply to curricular requirements of chemical science at this university and should be followed by CHEM 1100 or CHEM 1030.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: MATH 1100 or equivalent performance on the Math Placement Examination.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CHEM 1100 - General Chemistry I


    The theory and fundamental principles of chemistry are emphasized in this foundation course which serves primarily those who intend to enroll for more than two semesters of chemistry. Students well prepared may earn credit by taking an examination.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: One year of high school chemistry and either MATH 1110 or equivalent performance on math placement examination. Students should concurrently enroll in CHEM 1110. (To count for general education credit, both CHEM 1100 and 1110 must be passed.)

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I and II
  
  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry Laboratory I


    The companion laboratory course to CHEM 1100. This course is also intended for students who completed a general chemistry course without laboratory at another institution.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Corequisite: CHEM 1100 (unless successfully completed in a prior term) or applicable transfer credit. (To count for general education credit, both CHEM 1100 and 1110 must be passed.)

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I and II
  
  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II


    The properties of a number of the more representative elements and the compounds which they form are studied. Chemical relationships in the periodic table, electrochemistry, and the equilibrium principle are also treated.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 1100 and 1110.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I and II
  
  • CHEM 1130 - General Chemistry Laboratory II


    The companion laboratory course to CHEM 1120.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Corequisite: CHEM 11200 (unless successfully completed in a prior term).

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I and II
  
  • CHEM 1510 - Chemistry for Health Professionals I


    First semester of a two course sequence for College of Health and Human Services students whose curricula require an introduction to biochemistry. The first semester emphasizes general and organic chemistry. This course does not satisfy curricular requirements for chemistry outside of the College of Health and Human Services.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Corequisite: CHEM 1520 (unless successfully completed in a previous semester).

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
  • CHEM 1520 - Chemistry for Health Professionals I Lab


    This laboratory course is designed to complement CHEM 1510.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Corequisite: CHEM 1510 (unless CHEM 1510 has previously been successfully completed).

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall
  
  • CHEM 1530 - Chemistry for Health Professionals II


    The continuation of CHEM 1510, emphasizing biochemistry. This course does not satisfy curricular requirements for chemistry outside the College of Health and Human Services, nor the chemistry requirements of the Physician Assistant Program. Prerequisites: CHEM 1510 and 1520.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Corequisite: CHEM 1540 (unless successfully completed in a prior term).

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Spring
  
  • CHEM 1540 - Chemistry for Health Professionals II Lab


    This is the laboratory course which should be taken concurrently with CHEM 1530.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 1510 and 1520. Corequisite: CHEM 1530 (unless successfully completed in a prior term).

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Spring
  
  • CHEM 1900 - Chemistry in Society


    This course provides an overview of fundamental chemical principles so that the impact of chemistry on topics of importance to society may be discussed. These topics may include such areas as chemistry of the environment (air and water), radioactivity, energy sources, pharmaceuticals, household products, plastics, and food chemistry. Credit does not apply for a major or minor in chemistry.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: MATH 1100. Corequisite: CHEM 1910 (unless successfully completed in a prior term). (To count for general education credit, both CHEM 1900 and 1910 must be passed.)

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CHEM 1910 - Chemistry in Society Laboratory


    This is the laboratory portion of CHEM 1900 which must be taken concurrently with or after passing CHEM 1900.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: MATH 1100. Corequisite: CHEM 1900. (To count for general education credit, both CHEM 1900 and 1910 must be passed.)

    Credits: 1 hour

  
  • CHEM 2250 - Quantitative Analysis


    This course includes the theory, techniques, and calculations of quantitative analysis. Instrumental techniques are used to supplement classical analytical procedures in the laboratory.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 1120 and 1130. Corequisite: CHEM 2260 (unless successfully completed in a prior term).

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CHEM 2260 - Quantitative Analysis Laboratory


    This is the laboratory course which should be taken concurrently with CHEM 2250.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHEM 1120 and 1130. Corequisite: CHEM 2250 (unless successfully completed in a prior term).

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CHEM 2800 - Physical Science for Elementary Educators II


    This laboratory-based course is a continuation of PHYS 1800 and is specifically designed for prospective elementary teachers. The objectives of the course are to aid student sin developing meaningful and functional understanding of key physics concepts and their interrelations; to provide students with open-ended problem solving environments that facilitate insight in the nature of science as an intellectual activity; to explore alternated conceptions of scientific phenomena; to help students develop more positive attitudes about science and increase their confidence in their ability to do science.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CHEM 3550 - Introductory Biochemistry


    A basic course in the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 3700 AND CHEM 3710; or CHEM 3770 and CHEM 3780.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
  • CHEM 3560 - Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory


    Basic biochemistry laboratory techniques. Isolation and properties of proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids. Use of instrumentation for bioanalytical determinations.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 3550 or CHEM 5500.

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
  • CHEM 3700 - Introduction to Organic Chemistry


    A one semester course which surveys the chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic carbon compounds, designed for those needing a working knowledge of organic chemistry without the theoretical detail of a full year course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 1120 and 1130. Credit may not be received for both CHEM 3750 and 3700. CHEM 3700 is not a satisfactory prerequisite for CHEM 3770. It is strongly recommended that students take CHEM 3710 concurrently.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Spring, Summer I
  
  • CHEM 3710 - Introduction to Organic Chemistry Lab


    This course is the laboratory to accompany CHEM 3700 and should be taken concurrently with CHEM 3700.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHEM 1120 and 1130. Corequisite: CHEM 3700.

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Spring, Summer I
  
  • CHEM 3750 - Organic Chemistry I


    The preparation and chemical properties of aliphatic and aromatic compounds are studied. The emphasis is placed on the nature of covalent bonds and molecules and the general reactions of functional groups.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 1120 and 1130. It is strongly recommended that students take CHEM 3760 concurrently.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
  • CHEM 3760 - Organic Chemistry Lab I


    This course is the laboratory to accompany CHEM 3750. Should be taken concurrently with CHEM 3750.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 1120 and 1130. Corequisite: CHEM 3750.

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
  • CHEM 3770 - Organic Chemistry II


    This course is the continuation of CHEM 3750.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 3750 and 3760. It is strongly recommended that students take CHEM 3780 concurrently.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer II
  
  • CHEM 3780 - Organic Chemistry Lab II


    This course is the laboratory to accompany CHEM 3770. Should be taken concurrently with CHEM 3770.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 3750, CHEM 3760. Corequisite: CHEM 3770.

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer II
  
  • CHEM 3900 - Special Problems in Chemistry


    This course is designed to give students that have completed basic chemistry an opportunity to receive credit for experience in chemical laboratory independent study in association with a faculty member. May be repeated once for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: 18 hours of chemistry, with approval of the department chairperson and a faculty director.

    Credits: 2 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CHEM 4300 - Physical Chemistry I


    Lectures on kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics, phase rule, equilibria, electrochemistry, quantum theory, spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, chemical kinetics and mechanisms, transport properties, surface chemistry, macromolecules, crystal structure, etc.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: PHYS 2050, 2060, 2070, 2080; MATH 2720; CHEM 1120 and 1130.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
  • CHEM 4310 - Physical Chemistry II


    A continuation of CHEM 4300.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHEM 4300.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Spring
  
  • CHEM 4360 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory I


    Laboratory experiments designed to emphasize and reinforce the principles covered in CHEM 430, with consideration of the limitations of physical measurements and their quantitative and qualitative interpretation. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 2250 and 2260, and 4300.

    Credits: 2 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CHEM 4370 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory II


    Laboratory experiments designed to emphasize and reinforce the principles covered in CHEM 4310. This course expands on the qualitative and quantitative interpretation or physical and chemical measurement skills introduced in CHEM 4360.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 4310 and CHEM 4360, both may be taken concurrently.

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CHEM 4950 - Co-op/Internship


    Research or practical training experience outside the department or university. This work is to be summarized in a written report. Students may take up to a maximum of six credit hours in CHEM 4950. Consent of the instructor will be required so that students can be matched appropriately with employers according to the course work they have completed.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

  
  • CHEM 5070 - Ethical Chemical Practice


    This class addresses ethical standards and professional practice for the conduct of chemists. Students will learn to access and search the scientific literature, develop a set of ethical standards, and maintain a safe laboratory environment in an atmosphere of responsible care. The course will also address responsibilities of the individual professional care. The course will also address responsibilities of the individual professional in group, academic, and industrial settings.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Twenty-four hours of Chemistry.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior status and 12 hours of work in chemistry may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of the department chair.
    When Offered: Spring
  
  • CHEM 5090 - Topics in Chemistry


    A topic is presented in greater depth or from a perspective different from that of a typical undergraduate course. Representative topics such as microprocessors, industrial chemistry, chemical pollution, etc. according to student interest and request.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: 16 hours of chemistry.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior status and 12 hours of work in chemistry may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of the department chair.
  
  • CHEM 5150 - Inorganic Chemistry


    The course, along with CHEM 5700 and 5750, provides a capstone chemistry experience for undergraduates. The course will present the principles of inorganic chemistry in terms of its relevance to the “real world” of industry and environmental protection. Topics include symmetry, structure, and bonding, as well as a survey of the descriptive chemistry of the elements. Students are strongly advised to have already completed CHEM 5700 and be registered concurrently in CHEM 5750.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHEM 4310 or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior status and 12 hours of work in chemistry may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of the department chair.
    When Offered: Fall
  
  • CHEM 5200 - Instrumental Methods in Chemistry


    An introduction to the theory and application of modern chemical instrumentation is presented. General topics covered are elementary electronics, electrochemistry, spectroscopy, and other instrumental techniques. This course includes lecture and laboratory.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite or Corequisite: CHEM 4310, 4360.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior status and 12 hours of work in chemistry may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of the department chair.
    When Offered: Fall
  
  • CHEM 5250 - Techniques in Water Analysis


    Analytical techniques and methodology commonly used to determine water quality are presented. Modern instrumental methods are stressed with particular emphasis on spectroscopic and chromatographic measurements. Laboratory provides practical experience in application of principles discussed in lecture. This course is not available to Chemistry majors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 3700 and 3710 or 3770 and 3780.

    Credits: 2 hours

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior status and 12 hours of work in chemistry may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of the department chair.
  
  • CHEM 5280 - Chemical Separations


    Principles and applications of chemical separations, including distillation, crystallization, extraction, electrophoresis and a variety of chromatographic techniques are presented. Laboratory exercises illustrate typical applications of the methods.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHEM 3770.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior status and 12 hours of work in chemistry may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of the department chair.
    When Offered: Spring every other year (odd years)
  
  • CHEM 5500 - Biochemistry I


    The chemistry, properties, and molecular biology of proteins and nucleic acids. Includes discussions of amino acids, enzymes and biochemical energetics.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 3770, CHEM 3780, and CHEM 4300.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior status and 12 hours of work in chemistry may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of the department chair.
    When Offered: Fall
  
  • CHEM 5510 - Biochemistry I Laboratory


    This is the lab course that complements CHEM 550. Experiments involve more advanced techniques and instrumentation than in CHEM 356. Emphasis will be on purification and properties of proteins and nucleic acids.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 3770, CHEM 3780, and CHEM 4300; CHEM 5500 is either a prerequisite or corequisite.

    Credits: 2 hours

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior status and 12 hours of work in chemistry may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of the department chair.
    When Offered: Fall
  
  • CHEM 5540 - Biochemistry II


    Continuation of CHEM 550. Chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Metabolism of amino acids and photosynthesis.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHEM 5500.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior status and 12 hours of work in chemistry may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of the department chair.
    When Offered: Spring
  
  • CHEM 5580 - Toxicology


    Through a lecture/discussion format, the means by which toxicants exert their effects on mammalian, aquatic and ecological systems will be explored. Topics will include bioaccumulation, distribution and excretion of chemicals in the body, the role of metabolism in enhancing or reducing toxicity, mechanisms of toxicity and the effects of toxicants on the major organ systems. Chemodynamic processes which control exposure of organisms will be presented in the context of risk assessment and the problems inherent in predicting and quantifying risks will be discussed. This course is cross-listed with BIOS 5600.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BIOS 3500 and [CHEM 3550 or CHEM 5540 with a grade of “C” or better], or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior status and 12 hours of work in chemistry may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of the department chair.
    When Offered: Fall
  
  • CHEM 5700 - Advanced Organic Chemistry and Spectroscopy


    This course, along with CHEM 5150 and 5750, provides a capstone chemistry experience for undergraduates. The course expands on fundamentals of organic reactions and mechanisms through investigation of molecular structure and reactivity. Students will gain experience in modern spectral interpretation and will learn to use the organic chemical literature and databases.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 3770, 3780, 4310 and 24 hours of chemistry.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior status and 12 hours of work in chemistry may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of the department chair.
    When Offered: Fall every other year (odd years)
  
  • CHEM 5750 - Advanced Chemical Synthesis


    This course provides a synthetic laboratory experience for undergraduates in conjunction with the CHEM 5700 and CHEM 5150 capstone courses. The fundamentals of synthetic techniques will be exercised through independent synthetic laboratory projects and detailed investigations of molecular structure using modern spectroscopic methods. Students will get hands-on experience with modern spectroscopic instrumentation and will learn to utilize the chemical literature and databases. It is strongly recommended that CHEM 5700 be taken before CHEM 5750 to prepare students for spectral interpretation.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 3770, 3780, 4310, 5200 or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 2 hours

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior status and 12 hours of work in chemistry may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of the department chair.
    When Offered: Spring
  
  • CHEM 5900 - Special Problems in Chemistry


    Research work on a problem in chemistry in association with a faculty member. This research work is to be summarized in a written report. May be repeated once for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 4360, 24 hours of chemistry, with approval of the department chairperson and a faculty director.

    Credits: 2 hours

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior status and 12 hours of work in chemistry may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of the department chair.
    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CHEM 5980 - Readings in Chemistry


    In consultation with a faculty member, the student will design a reading list in a specialized area. The student will master the material independently and will prepare a paper or other summary work as agreed with the faculty member.  This course may be repeated for up to a total of six credit hours.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  12 hours of CHEM courses or graduate status.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

    Notes: Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.
  
  • CHEM 5990 - Independent Study in Chemistry


    Under the direction of a faculty member, highly qualified advanced students or small groups may pursue student-initiated research projects. The results will be summarized in a paper or other work as agreed with the faculty member. This course may be repeated for up to a total of six credit hours.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: 12 hours of CHEM courses or graduate standing.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

    Notes: Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.
  
  • CHIN 1000 - Basic Chinese I


    Fundamentals of Chinese. Background and practice in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • CHIN 1010 - Basic Chinese II


    Continuation of CHIN 1000.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHIN 1000 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • CHIN 2000 - Intermediate Chinese I


    The development of spoken and written expression in Chinese. Review of fundamental grammar and skills.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHIN 1010 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • CHIN 2010 - Intermediate Chinese II


    The continued development of spoken and written expression in Chinese. Readings and discussions of civilization and culture materials.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHIN 2000 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • CHIN 2100 - Business Chinese


    This course is designed to introduce students to various aspects of Chinese business culture and to provide basic business Chinese training. By linking the relationship between business culture and business language, this course will equip students with basic language skills and knowledge to do business in Chinese speaking countries and areas or with Chinese companies. Topics such as the following will be studied: the first business meeting; business negotiation; business connection; signing a contract; shipping and handling; and foreign trade corporations. We will emphasize communicative activities, and combine the language training with the introduction of Chinese business culture. Although students have different language background, all students are required to make a good faith effort to speak the target language at every relevant opportunity. It is our goal to use as much Chinese as possible while participating in this program. By the end of the course, students should be able to actively participate in basic business conversations.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CHIN 2750 - Chinese Life and Culture


    This course is designed to introduce selected themes of Chinese life and culture, past and present. The main themes covered by this course are mostly linguistic, literary, philosophic, artistic, and religious. The course will be offered in English with no prerequisites and open to all students. The aim is to provide students new to the subject with an informed and balanced first impression of some of the fundamental components of Chinese culture, and to do so in such a way as to demonstrate its differences from the Western heritage while also noting their universal human value.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CHIN 2800 - Chinese Calligraphy


    Introduction to the history of Chinese calligraphy and a brief theoretical framework for appreciation of the aesthetic qualities of the brushwork. A series of practice sessions will be held to facilitate a hands-on learning process for the lay person on major scripts. Taught in English, with translation for Chinese characters, can count toward minor in Chinese.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CHIN 3160 - Chinese Composition


    Advanced study of composition in Chinese. Emphasis is upon increasing the student’s command of written Chinese. Chinese characters competency and basic skills of using Chinese word processors are reinforced.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHIN 2010 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CHIN 3170 - Chinese Conversation


    Advanced study of conversation in Chinese. Students practice spoken Chinese through role-playing, the viewing of films, discussion, and other oral activities. Emphasis on both listening and speaking of the language.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHIN 2010 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • CHIN 4760 - Foreign Study - non WMU


    Student participation in pre-approved program of study abroad that is not through Western Michigan University.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites:  Prior approval of departmental advisor or chairperson.

    Credits: 1 - 16 hours

    Notes: Repeatable for credit up to 32 credit hours.
  
  • CHIN 4770 - Foreign Study


    Student participation in departmentally approved program of study abroad. Repeatable for credit up to 32 credit hours.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Prior permission of departmental advisor and chairperson.

    Credits: Variable

    When Offered: (Fall/Winter 1 to 16 hours) Spring/Summer 1 to 8 hours
  
  • CHIN 5030 - Chinese - English Translation Practicum


    This is a practical course to teach the skills for translating texts from Chinese into English. The objective of this course is to develop further language proficiency and to introduce students to the nuts and bolts of translation. Students will produce English translations from different sorts of Chinese texts, such as news, essays, documents, poetry, and short fiction.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHIN 2010 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 1 - 4 hours

    Notes: May be repeated for credit. Open to Upperclass and Graduate students.
  
  • CHIN 5200 - Topics in Chinese Linguistics and Language Science


    The advanced study of a language or a group of languages from a scientific point of view, such as the function and status of languages in society, the comparative history of different language families or the manipulation of language for pragmatic needs across cultures. May be offered as ARAB/CHIN/FREN/GER/ GREK/ITAL/JPNS/LAT/RUSS 5200.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Completion of 4 courses in area of specialization.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: 5000-level courses may be taken only by advanced undergraduate students. Advanced undergraduate students are defined as those who have satisfactorily completed a minimum of four courses, or equivalent, applicable towards a minor in any one language. Each course, however, may have more specific and/or additional prerequisites
  
  • CHIN 5500 - Independent Study in Chinese


    Directed individual study of a specific topic in Chinese language, literature, or culture. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of three hours.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Completion of four courses in Chinese or equivalent; minimum grade point average of 3.0 in Chinese; departmental approval required.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

    Notes: 5000-level courses may be taken only by advanced undergraduate students. Advanced undergraduate students are defined as those who have satisfactorily completed a minimum of four courses, or equivalent, applicable towards a minor in any one language. Each course, however, may have more specific and/or additional prerequisites
  
  • CIS 1020 - Introduction to Business Computing


    This course focuses on developing students’ skills in business applications of productivity software and information technologies. All course activities relate to data manipulation, communication, organization, or analysis for decision making in various business functional areas. Specific topics covered include advanced use of spreadsheets, development of integrated electronic documents for business communications, database storage, retrieval, and reporting, creating and editing Internet web pages for business information display and data transfer, development of professional business presentation, and Internet search. 

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: A student may receive credit for only one of CIS 1020, CIS 1100, CS 1050, FCS 2250, HPER 1490, or SOC 1820.
  
  • CIS 1100 - Business Computing


    This self-paced, one-credit course focuses on business computing skills needed by individuals to increase their productivity. It is designed as an equivalent course to CIS 1020 for students with partial skills in computer usage. This course develops student’s skills with spreadsheets, databases, search techniques, basic Web page creation and the use of computers as a presentation medium. A student may receive credit for only one of CIS 1020, CIS 1100, CS 1000, CS 1050, FCS 2250, HPER 1490 or SOC 1820.

    Credits: 1 hour

    Notes: The course is open only to Pre-Business majors.
  
  • CIS 2600 - Business Programming A


    This course introduces the fundamental concepts and implementations of modern visual programming language in a business environment. Major topics include general programming tools for business applications, fundamentals of business programming such as data types, expressions, and operators, etc., and basic programming structures of business applications.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CIS 1020 or CIS 1100 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CIS 2610 - Business Programming B


    This course introduces principles and techniques of object-oriented programming. It emphasizes on proper formulation and abstraction of the problem domain to build robust, flexible, and extensible business applications. Topics include programming logic, documentation, object-orientated design, user interfaces, business programming logic, and software verification and validation in the business environment.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CIS 1020 or CIS 1100 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CIS 2640 - Business Reporting and Analysis


    This course is designed to give students comprehensive skills and in-depth knowledge to plan, design and deliver business reports that will help management analyze and interpret complex business information. Business report solutions that range from personal productivity software to full-scale reporting systems will be studied.

     

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CIS 1020 or CIS 1100 or CS 1050 or CS 1000 or FCS 2250 or HPER 1490.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course is restricted to students with sophomore status and a major (or pre-major) in Business Administration or General Business.

  
  • CIS 2800 - Internet Programming


    This course is a programming course that develops the basic knowledge and skills needed to implement solutions with Internet programming tools. Students will create Internet solutions using current client-side programming technologies such as XHTML, CSS, JavaScript and VBScript, as well as current server-side programming technologies such as PHP and ASP.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CIS 1020 or 1100 or equivalent and BCM 1420 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CIS 3260 - Networking and Data Communications


    This course provides an introduction to modern computer networking, data communications, network security, and associated technologies. The content focuses on the design, implementation, administration, and security of computer (wired and wireless) networks and data communications. The concepts of business networks as business process integration (BPI) tools to facilitate business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-customer (B2C) operations are also discussed. Case projects and hands-on labs are used throughout the course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Admission to the Business Administration program. This course is also open to Telecommunication and Information Managements majors with junior standing.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CIS 3600 - Systems Analysis and Design


    This course focuses on the methodologies that employ multi-phased process for developing information systems to be deployed in an organization. The course introduces various methods, techniques, and tools to determine and meet the information requirements by building proper information models that can be further implemented. This course is not merely a technical or computer course. It is a business course with strong focus on business applications. The course will cover roles, responsibilities, and mindset of the business analyst as well as the project manager rather than those of the programmer.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BUS 2700 or COM 2000; also open to Telecommunications and Information Management majors with junior standing.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CIS 3620 - Information Technology Project Management


    This course enables students to gain a clear and comprehensive understanding of structured Information Technology (IT) project management. The aim is to equip students with general IT project management skills and to give practical experience of applying project management processes. The course is designed to impart a comprehensive understanding of the project management techniques and the diverse organizational and managerial aspects of IT projects.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BUS 2700 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CIS 3660 - Information Assurance and Compliance


    This course examines information security and its managerial and legal requirements. The content focuses on information security fundamentals and technologies, security policy, risk assessment, network defense strategy and design, and information compliance. This course helps students understand and learn the information security architecture and management requirements for business process integration (BPI), disaster recovery, business continuity, incident response, and security management. Case projects are used throughout the course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BUS 2700 or COM 2000.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course is also open to Telecommunications and Information Management majors with junior standing.
  
  • CIS 3900 - Business Web Architecture


    This course applies human computer interaction theories, principles, and techniques to develop effective and usable Web applications for the business environment. Topics include WWW architecture, modern web-based languages, search engines, interactive content, multimedia, and other technologies for the WWW. Students will evaluate the effectiveness of various Web sites and develop Web applications to support Internet commerce. 

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Admission to the Business Administration curriculum; also open to Telecommunications and Information Management majors and e-Business Design minors both with junior standing.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CIS 4100 - Internship


    Under the direction of a faculty advisor, qualified students may engage in a variety of professional experiences. Scheduled meetings with advisor and written experience reports required. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 hours credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Approved application required.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

  
  • CIS 4600 - Business Database Applications


    This course focuses on the design and development of business database applications. Content includes data modeling, data dictionary, normalization theory, logical and physical database design, database inquiry using query languages, database implementation using modern database management systems and networking technologies, and data maintenance and administration skills. Students are required to construct and develop a business database using current technology and graphic user interface design packages. Students taking this course are required to have a laptop computer meeting the minimum specifications defined by the Haworth College of Business.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CIS 3600.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CIS 4640 - Business Data Mining


    This course focuses on the theoretical understanding and practical applications of data mining as a decision support tool. Specifically, it covers several types of modeling techniques and tools such as prediction, classification, segmentation and association detection algorithms. Students are introduced to the state-of-the-art data mining applications software such as SAS Enterprise Miner or SPSS Clementine for their class assignments and term project.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BUS 2700 and (MGMT 2500 or MKTG 2500) or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CIS 4700 - e-Portals Development


    This is an advanced course o the E-Business curriculum This course focuses on the design and development of Web-based information sharing systems - portals. Pertinent concepts of E-business, database integration and Internet programming will be implemented. Issues and strategies involved in developing successful portals are also discussed.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CIS 3900.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CIS 4900 - Electronic Commerce Development


    The trends in e-commerce architecture are studied within the scope of consumer-to-business, business-to-business relations and the enterprise evolution. The impact of e-commerce solutions upon local, national, and global trading are examined in order to plan a customized solution for a given business. A part of the course is skills-oriented with computer projects that employ modern web technologies with interactive database processing in support of cybercash, and other e-commerce components and activities, including security protection. Web sites are developed with strong links to real world business applications. Students taking this course are required to have a laptop computer meeting the minimum specifications defined by the Haworth College of Business.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CIS 3900; CIS 4600 (may be taken concurrently).

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CIS 4950 - Web Administration


    This course is focused on the use of advanced Web technologies, interfaces, and system development tools for the administration and maintenance of a secured Web site. Students are expected to use modern web software to implement Internet, Intranet, and Extranet solutions for E-business. In addition, students will also apply theories and methodologies to build an E-business oriented knowledge base. Students taking this course are required to have a laptop computer meeting the minimum specification defined by the HCoB.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CIS 3900 and CIS 4600; CIS 4600 may be taken concurrently.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CIS 4960 - Independent Study


    A directed independent project in the area of Computer Information Systems.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Approved application required.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

  
  • CIS 4980 - Readings


    A series of direct readings in the area of Computer Information Systems.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Approved application required.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

  
  • CIS 4990 - Enterprise Project


    This is the capstone course of the CIS curriculum. Applications of computer, programming, and system knowledge, and skills gained from the previous classes are applied in developing an enterprise-wide software project. Some industrial enterprise-wide packages are reviewed. A team approach is applied to develop and integrate different computerized business functions into an integrated software system. Project management techniques and computer simulated solutions are formally presented to emphasize team dynamics and management skills. Students taking this course are required to have a laptop computer meeting the minimum specifications defined by the Haworth College of Business.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CIS 4600.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CIS 5550 - Topics in Computer Information Systems


    Special topics appropriate to business applications such as data base management systems, structured concepts, networking, programming documentation and efficiency, planning, organizing and directing management information systems. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 1000 - Communication and Community Engagement


    This course will introduce and develop basic skills in major areas of communication, with an emphasis on the ways in which those skills can be used to engage and improve the communities in which we live. The course will address ethics, media literacy, citizen-oriented journalism, public dialogue, intergroup communication, co-cultural communication, team and service leadership, appreciative inquiry, and interpersonal communication.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to Communications majors and minors only.

    Notes: COM 1000 is a pre-requisite for students planning to major in any area of communication. Students must complete COM 1000 with a grade of “C” or better to fulfill the pre-requisite. This course satisfies General Education Proficiency 4d, Oral Communication.
  
  • COM 1040 - Public Speaking


    Study of the application of principles of communication underlying effective oral presentations, with attention given to speaking in business, professional and public settings. Includes practice in preparing, presenting and evaluating speeches and other forms of oral presentations. This course may be offered in an accelerated format.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 1700 - Interpersonal Communication


    An introductory course in communication theory and practice in which students utilize their powers of speech to increase their effectiveness in interpersonal relations through understanding of self and others. This course may be offered in an accelerated format.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 2000 - Human Communication Theory


    An introduction to major theories of human communication, designed to give students a critical understanding of key theories in the field and to show how these theories illuminate the nature of human interaction.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 2010 - Communication Inquiry


    This course introduces students to the humanistic and social science traditions of inquiry into human communication.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: COM 2000 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

 

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