Jul 14, 2024  
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • COM 2040 - Advanced Public Speaking


    Advanced study and presentation of informative, argumentative, persuasive and special occasion speeches.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: (COM 1000 or COM 1040) with a grade of “C” or better; or School approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 2100 - Performance of Literature I


    Emphasis is placed on developing the student’s appreciation of literature and his/her skill in analysis and performance of prose, poetry, and drama, including an introduction to group performance of literature.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 2400 - Introduction to Media and Telecommunications


    This course proposes to help students attain understanding of how media and telecommunication technologies are organized and how media products impact personal attitudes and life styles, patterns of social and public communication, as well as national and international policies and governance. The course surveys the history of these technologies, the scientific development of these technologies, the legal and ethical environment in which they operate, and the organizational, political, economic and social structures that sustain the telecommunication technologies and corresponding industries. Special attention is given to four sectors of the media and telecommunications fields: broadcasting, cable, telephony, and the internet.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 2410 - Film Communication


    An introduction to the unique language and elements of the film medium through the study of outstanding examples of historical and contemporary experimental, documentary and feature films.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 2560 - Electronic Media Operations


    Introduction to the technology, structure, operations and personnel of the electronic media/telecommunications craft and industry (radio, television, cable, webcast and cinema). This course approaches media from a socially responsible perspective - addressing introductory issues of media ownership, production development/procedures, and media distribution/exhibition, and provides students with a foundation for future production courses and related careers in electronic media.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 2570 - Introduction to Audio Production


    This introductory level course familiarizes students with the production of sound as a creative element in radio broadcasting and audio production. Students participate in the studio experience by writing and producing commercials, dramas, soundscapes, documentaries and other formats for radio and alternative creative media outlets.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: COM 1000 and either (COM 2410 or COM 2560); with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Film, Video and Media Studies; Pre-Film, Video and Media Studies; Public Relations; Pre-Public Relations; Journalism; Pre-Journalism.

  
  • COM 2800 - Introduction to Organizational Communication


    Provides a broad overview of the field of organizational communication, addressing both traditional and contemporary theories, concepts, and research. Students will undertake the systematic study of internal and external organizational communication processes at the individual, group, and organization-wide levels.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: COM 1000 or COM 2000 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 3050 - Special Topics in Communication


    Group study of special topics in communication education, interpersonal and organizational communication, mass communication, oral interpretation, and film. Many of these special courses are organized in response to special needs or interests of students on campus, in the community and in the region. Some topics are announced in the Schedule of Classes; some are added during the semester. Further information and a full listing of topics may be obtained from the School office, 301 Sprau Tower.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: May elect COM 3050 no more than twice, providing the topics are different.
  
  • COM 3070 - Freedom of Expression


    This course examines the meaning, scope and challenge of “free expression” in the American experience. Beginning with the historical and philosophical roots of free speech rights, students will critically examine how the courts, scholars and activists have interpreted and applied these rights to a number of controversial issues. Possible topics include free expression on the Internet and in the mass media, political protests, copyright law, and international difference in speech rights.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 3320 - Group Problem Solving


    This course examines principles and procedures of effective group communication with an emphasis on practical application of problem solving, decision making, and critical thinking skills. Individuals will work together in a variety of group situations learning to communicate effectively, plan agendas, make decisions, write and present group reports, and analyze group communication behaviors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: COM 1000 or COM 2000 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 3340 - Argumentation and Debate


    Theory and practice in argumentation and debate. Included are the analysis of propositions and the use of logic and evidence. Students will build, present, and defend cases. Students will also gain practical experience in managing forensic activities.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: COM 1040 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to minors in secondary communication education.

  
  • COM 3350 - Leadership


    A study of the characteristics and behaviors of leaders with emphasis on the development of leadership abilities in the individual for different group situations. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: COM 1000 and COM 2000 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Communication Studies, Pre-communication Studies, Organizational Communication, Pre-Organizational Communication, Pre-Communication, Public Relations, Pre-Public Relations, Communication minor.

  
  • COM 3410 - Film Modes and Genres


    This course focuses on analytic studies of representative films from various modes of film communication (narrative; non-narrative; film movements) and film genres (including, but not limited to, the musical, the western, the horror film, film melodrama, the science fiction film, film comedy, experimental film, etc.)

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: COM 2410 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 3420 - The International Film Industry


    This course surveys the history and development of commercial film and video from a global perspective, with an emphasis on the analysis of film and video content as well as industry practices in both Western and non-Western nations. We will use screenings of representative film and video work from across the globe to illustrate and explore the complex social, economic, technical, and aesthetic forces that shape the international entertainment industry.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: COM 2410 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 3430 - American Film History


    This course surveys developments over time in the production and reception of feature films. Major concerns will include the evolution of the studio system, the impact of technological change on film practice, influences on Hollywood of other national cinemas, and the changing relationship between Hollywood and American society. Representative films will provide key texts for each unit of the course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: COM 2410 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 3500 - Public Relations and Organizations


    The course examines the role of public relations and public information in a variety of organizations with a communication theory perspective. The course is designed to prepare individuals for positions in public relations and public information, or for other positions in organizations concerned with the flow of information across organization boundaries. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: COM 2000 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Communication Studies, Pre-Communication Studies, Journalism, Pre-Journalism, Organizational Communication, Pre-Organizational Communication, Pre-Communication, Public Relations, Pre-Public Relations

  
  • COM 3540 - Web Design Basics


    The course is designed to help students develop basic web design skills. The emphasis will be on effective communication using Web, basic HTML, and CSS. Fundamentals of Photoshop and Dreamweaver will be taught but the main emphasis will be on building an information-rich website based on usability principles and other accepted standards of web design.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 3550 - Introduction to Digital Video Production


    Familiarizes students with the design, planning, production, post-production and evaluation of digital electronic field production (EFP) techniques. Students will develop their own short video projects, and also serve as crew on various team projects, and learn the basics of non-linear MacIntosh computer based editing.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: COM 1000 and either (COM 2410 or COM 2560); with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Film, Media and Media Studies; Pre-Film, Media and Media Studies; Journalism; Pre-Journalism; Public Realtions; Pre-Public Realtions.

  
  • COM 3560 - Film Production


    This course gives students the opportunity to plan, script, shoot, and edit films in the 16 mm format. The course will provide cameras, editors, projectors, and work space. The course lab fee includes film stock and processing (up to 5 rolls), and editing materials.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: COM 1000 and COM 2410 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Film, Media and Media Studies; Pre-Film, Media and Media Studies; Journalism; Pre-Journalism; Public Realtions; Pre-Public Realtions.

  
  • COM 3570 - Introduction to TV Studio Production


    Explores the elements of television studio production planning and collaborative implementation. Students are introduced to TV studio operations including equipment operation, crew responsibilities, producing and directing various types of television studio formats.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: COM 1000 and either (COM 2410 or COM 2560); with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Film, Media and Media Studies; Pre-Film, Media and Media Studies; Journalism; Pre-Journalism; Public Realtions; Pre-Public Realtions.

  
  • COM 3580 - TV and Film Scripting


    The styles and techniques of film and television scripting for broadcast formats, station continuity, commercials, dramatic scripts, small format video, and documentary. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Film, Media and Media Studies; Pre-Film, Media and Media Studies; Journalism; Pre-Journalism; Public Relations; Pre-Public Relations

  
  • COM 3590 - Broadcast Journalism


    Radio and TV as news and information media. Studies and applies principles of news gathering and reporting, commentary, on-the-spot news coverage, features, and structure of the newscast. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Communication Studies; Pre-Communication Studies; Film, Video and Media Studies; Pre-Film, Video and Media Studies; Journalism; Pre-Journalism; Public Relations; Pre-Public Relations.

  
  • COM 3720 - Introduction to General Semantics


    A study of the function of language. The course deals with the nature and meaning of symbols and differences between the communication systems of the human animal and other species. Examines the assumptions held by Western man about the structure/function of his universe as reflected in language; the problem of “reality” as distinct from “meaning.” The purpose of the course is to increase the student’s awareness of his/her effectiveness as a thinker or symbol-user. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 3840 - Organizational Communication Technologies


    This course reviews the significance of communication techniques in our capacity to organize and engage in collective action; and how communication technologies affect the communication processes and outcomes at the interpersonal, organizational, and social contexts. Our approach encompasses both of the dominant ideological perspectives - techno-determinism and social constructivism in order to develop a more holistic perspective on the impact of communication technologies on our lives.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 3980 - Independent Study Communication


    Designed to allow outstanding students to work independently under faculty supervision. Includes extensive study, research or special creative projects in any of the several areas of communication. One to six hours credit may be accumulated.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Approval of the School Director.

    Credits: 1 - 6 hours

  
  • COM 4300 - Persuasion and Social Influence


    This course examines theory and research on social influence processes including compliance, conformity, and persuasion. Specifically, the course examines cognitive, interpersonal, and structural-level models of social influence and persuasion, and the impact of source, message, receiver, context, and channel on the influence process.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 4320 - Group Communication Theory


    A study of small group communication from theoretical perspectives. The emphasis will be on analyzing small group communication based on an understanding of group communication theories, concepts, and research methods.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: COM 3320 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 4400 - Public Relations Case Studies


    This course uses a case study approach to apply principles of communication and persuasion theory to public relations problems. The course examines a variety of types of organizations in relation to issue advocacy and public policy, risk communication, legitimization, defense, and crisis management.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: COM 3500 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Communication Studies, Pre-Communication Studies, Journalism, Pre-Journalism, Organizational Communication, Pre-Organizational Communication, Public Relations, Pre-Public Relations, Pre-Communication.

  
  • COM 4410 - Documentary in Film and Television


    A study of documentary philosophies, strategies, and accomplishments through an examination of important documentarists, movements, and films. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: COM 2410 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Communication Studies; Pre-Communication Studies; Film, Video and Media Studies; Pre-Film, Video and Media Studies; Journalism; Pre-Journalism; Public Relations; Pre-Public Relations; Communication minor; Journalism minor.

  
  • COM 4430 - Media and Social Change


    The course examines the role of the media in diffusing information, ideology, and persuasive messages, and explores the influence/effects of these transactions on individuals, groups and institutions. The course critically situates media within diverse elements of culture as an agent of social change.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 4440 - Mass Communication, News, and Public Affairs


    The course examines the role of the media in covering public affairs news and disseminating it to the public. Questions related to media access, fairness, media regulation and message production are discussed in light of current events.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 4450 - Media Criticism


    Examines the various functions and writings of contemporary media critics and establishes criteria for evaluating media content and critical methods. Students will read, view, and listen to a variety of media content, including television and radio programs, newspaper and magazine articles, advertisements, films, documentaries, and Web pages.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 4480 - Telecommunications Management


    The course examines broadcasting, telephone, cable, and other new communication technologies, with a primary emphasis on principles of telecommunication management, economics, and policy. The course is supplemented with a series of case studies and discussions pertaining to select management issues. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: (COM 1000 or BUS 2700) and COM 2400; with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Communication Studies, Pre-Communication Studies, Organizational Communication, Pre-Organizational Communication, Public Relations, Pre-Public Relations, Telecommunications and Information Management, Pre-Telecommunications and Information Management, Pre-Communication, Communication minor.

  
  • COM 4500 - Public Relations Program Development


    This is an advanced course in public relations emphasizing research methodology, developing planning objectives, and program evaluation for corporate, governmental, educational, and social service organizations. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: COM 2010 and COM 3500 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Communication Studies, Pre-Communication Studies, Journalism, Pre-Journalism, Organizational Communication, Pre-Organizational Communication, Public Relations, Pre-Public Relations, Pre-Communication.

  
  • COM 4550 - International Telecommunications


    This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the essential regulatory and policy issues governing the field of international telecommunications. Special attention is given to the major regulatory agencies and economic players responsible for the formation of telecommunications policy at the international level.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: (COM 1000 or BUS 2700) and COM 2400; with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Communication Studies, Pre-Communication Studies, Organizational Communication, Pre-Organizational Communication, Public Relations, Pre-Public Relations, Telecommunications and Information Management, Pre-Telecommunications and Information Management, Pre-Communication, Communication minor.

  
  • COM 4570 - Advanced Video Production


    This is an advanced course that gives students the opportunity to apply concepts developed in several other media production classes. Students work in production teams and independently to conceptualize, design, and produce segments for collaborative long-form programs and/or single video projects. Students serve as crew for other members of the class as needed. The course includes specialized areas of focus within single-camera, digital media field production such as pre-production planning, lighting, audio, directing, post-production, and working with talent. COM 3550 or familiarity with Apple/MAC platform is highly recommended.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Two of the following: COM 3550, COM 3560, or COM 3570; or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 4700 - Advanced Interpersonal Communication


    This course will provide students with an in-depth treatment of advanced interpersonal communication. Students will complete an applied project within a particular interpersonal context, synthesizing existing competencies in public presentation, research methods, and interpersonal communication theory. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: (COM 1000 or COM 1040) and COM 1700 and COM 2010, with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors: Communication Studies, Pre-Communication Studies, Interpersonal Communication, Pre-Interpersonal Communication, Organizational Communication; Pre-Organizational Communication; Pre-Communication.

  
  • COM 4720 - Nonverbal Communication


    The course examines theory and research in the nature and function of nonverbal message systems. Topics include: the role of nonverbal communication in the developmental stages of humans; individual differences in ability to interpret messages; the relationship of nonverbal communication to the concept of culture; extension of a person such as space, clothing, possessions; and specific messages related to the face and body.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 4740 - Intercultural Communication


    An examination of the factors contributing to effective communication in an intercultural context. The course focuses on such topics as ethnocentrism, cultural perceptions, values and beliefs, language and meaning, and nonverbal factors. Communication systems of selected cultures are described and analyzed.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 4750 - Family Communication


    Examines the current literature pertaining to holistic systems, power influences, and satisfactory patterns of family communications. Students analyze family interactions and identify satisfactory patterns of marital family communication.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 4770 - Communication Ethics


    Ethical theories and justification models are studied and related to ethical decision making in a variety of communication contexts, including mass communication, organizational communication, and interpersonal communication. The course will examine the components of good ethical decision making in communication, as well as obstacles that can stand in the way of responsible choices.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 4790 - Gender and Communication


    Examines the variable of gender as it influences communication between women and men. Topics include female-male stereotypes, interpersonal attraction, differences in female-male verbal and nonverbal codes, relational dialogues and patterns, and female-male interaction on the job.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 4800 - Applied Topics in Organizational Communication


    This course will enable students to master knowledge and skills in an applied specialty area of organizational communication. Students will participate in an extensive hands-on project addressing a pragmatic problem in an organizational setting. Topics will vary. Six hours of COM 4800 may be taken for credit toward the Organizational Communication major. 

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: COM 2010 and COM 2800 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Communication Studies, Pre-Communication Studies, Organizational Communication, Pre-Organizational Communication, Public Relations, Pre-Public Relations, Pre-Communication.

    Notes: May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
  
  • COM 4830 - Interviewing


    Theories and principles of planning, conducting, and evaluating interviews are studied and applied to specific interview types, including selection, performance appraisal, survey, and journalistic interviews. Emphasis is placed on the perspective of the interviewer rather than interviewee.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 4840 - Health Communication


    Studies concepts and theories relevant to the maintenance and enhancement of effective communication in health care settings. Emphasis is given to the study and application of communication theories, to the transactions which occur among health professionals, and between professionals and clients/patients. This course may be offered in an accelerated format.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • COM 4990 - Internship


    This internship for academic credit is available only to those students who meet School requirements of prerequisite courses and grade point average. Specific requirements for various types of internships are described in the School’s undergraduate handbook, available in the School of Communication office.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Minimum G.P.A. of 2.5; junior standing or higher, declared major or minor in the School of Communication.

    Credits: 1 to 6 hours

  
  • COM 5410 - Telecommunications Law and Policy


    This course provides an overview of the essential regulatory and policy issues governing the fields of media and telecommunications. Special attention is given to such topics as First Amendment, libel, intellectual property, media ownership and privacy. A case study approach is used for the purpose of understanding legal precedent.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: (COM 1000 or BUS 2700) and COM 2400; with a grade of “C” or better. 

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Communication Studies, Pre-Communication Studies, Organizational Communication, Pre-Organizational Communication, Public Relations, Pre-Public Relations, Telecommunication and Information Management, Pre-Telecommunication and Information Management, Pre-communication, Communication minor.

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior or senior status with listed prerequisites completed may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of advisor and/or instructor
  
  • COM 5510 - Methods of Media Analysis


    An investigation of the approaches to media analysis (auteurist, intentionalist, sociological, structural, historical, ideological, psychological) by intensive “reading” and shot sequence examination and evaluation of widely divergent works.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: COM 2410 or COM 3560 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Film, Video and Media Studies; Pre-Film, Video and Media Studies; Journalism; Pre-Journalism; Public Relations; Pre-Public Relations.

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior or senior status with listed prerequisites completed may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of advisor and/or instructor.
  
  • COM 5540 - Communication Technology


    This course provides an overview of telecommunications technology and services, including satellite communication, fiber optics, wireless communication, advanced digital television and Internet communication. Special attention is given to the business strategies underlying the use of such technologies and services, while also exploring the policy and social use issues that are likely to result from the development of new and enhanced forms of communication technology.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: (COM 1000 or BUS 2700) and COM 2400; with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Communication Studies, Pre-Communication Studies, Organizational Communication, Pre-Organizational Communication, Public Relations, Pre-Public Relations, Telecommunications and Information Management, Pre-Telecommunications and Information Management, Pre-Communication, Communication minor.

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior or senior status with listed prerequisites completed may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of advisor and/or instructor.
  
  • COM 5550 - Multi-Media Production


    This course is designed to help students develop competencies required to produce linear and non-linear interactive multi-media projects. By the end of the semester students will gain an understanding and appreciation of the steps necessary to produce multimedia projects and the concepts, tools, and techniques involved in the design and delivery of interactive multimedia projects. Students will also be able to create a fully functional multimedia document delivered via a CD-ROM.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: COM 2410 or COM 2560 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Film, Video and Media Studies; Pre-Film, Video and Media Studies; Journalism; Pre-Journalism; Public Relations; Pre-Public Relations.

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior or senior status with listed prerequisites completed may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of advisor and/or instructor.
  
  • COM 5600 - Teaching Communication


    This course provides an overview of the concepts, materials, and methods used in teaching communication courses. The focus will be on the following: (a) philosophies and theories of speech communication, (b) development of instructional strategies and objectives, and (c) development and evaluation of teaching materials. Students will take part in, observe, and evaluate teaching-learning processes.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: COM 1000 and COM 1040 and COM 2000 with a grade of “C” or better or School approval. 

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to: Communication: Secondary Education minor.

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior or senior status with listed prerequisites completed may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of advisor and/or instructor.
  
  • COM 5640 - Telecommunications Networks


    This course provides an overview of telecommunications networking technologies, standards, and protocols. Network configurations, switching technologies and signaling standards that sustain voice and data communications networks, corporate networks, and advanced intelligent networks are major sections of the course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: (COM 1000 or BUS 2700) and COM 2400; with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: Restricted to the following majors/minors: Communication Studies, Pre-Communication Studies, Organizational Communication, Pre-Organizational Communication, Public Relations, Pre-Public Relations, Telecommunications and Information Management, Pre-Telecommunications and Information Management, Pre-Communication, Communication minor.

    Notes: Undergraduates with junior or senior status with listed prerequisites completed may enroll in 5000-level courses with prior approval of advisor and/or instructor.
  
  • CORP 2560 - Introduction to Community and Regional Planning


    This course introduces students to the contemporary practices of community and regional planning in American cities, towns and metropolitan areas. Within this context, the course will provide students with a basic understanding of the history, theory and practice of community and regional planning as means by which communities broadly engage in efforts to confront social issues and improve their quality of life. The course will also introduce a variety of techniques commonly used in the professional practice of planning from the perspective of a general understanding of ways by which planning contributes to changing social, economic, and physical conditions in American cities, town and regions.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
    When Offered: Fall
  
  • CORP 3000 - History and Theory of Planning


    The history of urban and regional planning in the United States as well as some introduction to the history of urban and regional planning internationally. The development of the theory of planning through readings, lectures and discussion. Topics include history of city and regional planning; theory about the manner in which planning and policy-making is undertaken - economic theories, theories of government intervention, decision theory, and theories of knowledge in planning - and contributions of significant persons, events, publications, projects, organizations, plans, and programs at local, state, and national levels to the evolution of planning practice and the profession in America.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  CORP 2560.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CORP 3030 - Planning Inquiry


    Students will be introduced to Planning as a field of study, research, and professional opportunity. Students will have an opportunity to investigate social and environmental problems through data collection, analysis, interpretation and graphic and written presentation. The emphasis throughout will be on the application of inquiry models to geographic and planning problems. For Planning majors and minors. 

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: STAT 2160 or STAT 2600 or STAT 3640 or STAT 3660.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Course meets University Baccalaureate Writing Requirement.
  
  • CORP 3040 - Methods of Planning Analysis


    Introduction to a variety of methods of planning analysis used in the investigation of community and regional issues, and the practice of community and regional planning. Topics include population and demographic analysis, local and regional socio-economic analysis, and spatial and environmental analysis.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  CORP 2560, and (STAT 2160 or STAT 2600 or STAT 3660).

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CORP 4030 - Planning Law and Administration


    The course will focus on the legal foundations of land use planning in the United States and in the state of Michigan including governmental institutions, real property, constitutional law, land use law, and environmental law. Administrative aspects of governmental practice as applied to land use regulation, land development, and the processes of local and regional plan development and implementation will also be covered.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  CORP 2560.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CORP 4560 - Seminar in Community and Regional Planning


    A survey of the field of land use planning; concepts of land use planning; traditional and contemporary approaches to land use planning; the background and practice of zoning and subdivision regulations in American municipalities; land use and transportation planning.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CORP 3560 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CORP 5580 - Planning Studio


    A project oriented studio course designed to focus on applied planning and design techniques. Integration and application of skills and knowledge from other courses to “real-life” community-based planning projects. Projects will integrate the physical and human environments: terrain and landscape, natural and cultural context, microclimate, infrastructure, and adjacent land uses, economic and environmental impacts, etc. Studio seminars, discussion, and field visits will explore theory and practice in observation, problem formulation, alternatives generation, and plan development and presentation.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  CORP 2560.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CS 1000 - Fluency With Information Technology


    Foundational concepts of information technology (IT), plus the opportunities and limitations of computer systems. Various computer applications - including operating systems, file managers, Internet browsers and search engines, email and other network applications, word processing, spreadsheet, database and presentation software. Application of IT methodologies in high-level problem-solving through self-learning computer projects. Specialized lab assignments (or sections) available to meet needs of a discipline (or department). A General Education Area VII course. Cannot be used to satisfy computer science major or minor program requirements.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CS 1010 - What is Computer Science?


    This course surveys the discipline of computer science and discusses: the history of computing, binary numbers and data representation, computer logic, components of a computer, problem solving and algorithmic design, low-level and high-level programming, abstract data types and algorithms, operating systems, file systems and databases, artificial intelligence, simulations, and networks and the World Wide Web. It differentiates computer science, computer engineering, information processing, and other areas of study of computing and computing technology. A General Education Area VII course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Basic computer literacy/usage and MATH 1110. Co-requisite: CS 1011.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CS 1011 - What is Computer Science? - Lab


    This laboratory course accompanies CS 1010 What is Compute Science? It provides hands-on experience for students in a broad range of areas of computing including number systems, digital logic, computer programming, operating systems, databases, artificial intelligence, and computability. Students will be introduced to programming in a higher level language. A General Education Area VII course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Basic computer literacy/usage and MATH 1100. Corequisite: CS 1010.

    Credits: 1 hour

  
  • CS 1021 - Introduction to Engineering Computing I: Spreadsheets


    An introduction to computing for engineers and technologists using spreadsheets. Basic concepts and structures of spreadsheets are presented. Examples come from diverse disciplines of engineering, technology, and computer science. Students learn how spreadsheets are different from and similar to mathematical software and computer programming. Practical experience with spreadsheets is gained in laboratories built into this course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: MATH 1180

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CS 1022 - Introduction to Engineering Computing II: Mathematical Software


    An introduction to computing for engineers and technologists using mathematical software. Basic concepts and structures of mathematical software are presented. Examples come from diverse disciplines of engineering, technology, and computer science. Students learn how mathematical software is different from and similar to mathematical software and computer programming. Practical experience with mathematical software is gained in laboratories built into this course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: MATH 1180

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CS 1023 - Introduction to Engineering Computing III: Computer Programming


    An introduction to computing for engineers and technologists using elementary computer programming. Basic concepts and structures of computer programming are presented. Examples come from diverse disciplines of engineering, technology, and computer science. Students learn how computer programming is different from and similar to mathematical software and computer programming. Practical experience with elementary computer programming is gained in laboratories built into this course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: MATH 1180

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CS 1040 - Introductory C/C++


    This course provides an introduction to programming using a subset of the C++ language. Topics covered will include: programming practices and structures; C++ syntax including variable declaration types, arrays, assignment statements, looping, functions, scope of variables, pointers and basic input-output. Although classes are introduced, concepts of object oriented programming will not be covered.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: 1-1/2 years of high school algebra or MATH 1110.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • CS 1060 - Introductory Visual BASIC


    This course provides an introduction to programming in the BASIC language using Visual BASIC. It is designed primarily to give students enough background so they can use BASIC in further course work.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: 1-1/2 years of high school algebra or MATH 1110.

    Credits: 1 hour

    Notes: This course does not fulfill the computer literacy requirement.
  
  • CS 1110 - Computer Science I


    A first course in the science of programming digital computers. Analysis of problems and development of correct procedures for their solution will be emphasized along with the expression of algorithmic solutions to problems in a structured high level computer language. Applications will solve both numerical and non-numerical problems for the computer.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: MATH 1180 (or higher) (may be taken concurrently).

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates and those graduate students admitted under the PCS (Permission to take Computer Science) classification.
    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CS 1120 - Computer Science II


    This course is a continuation of Computer Science I with more emphasis on top-down, modular, structured design and techniques involved in the production of large computer programs. Advanced language features such as recursion, sets, pointers, records/structures will be discussed. Data structures and their various implementations are introduced. Design and analysis of various searching and sorting techniques will be presented. Elementary file processing using sequential and random access input and output will be demonstrated. A team project will be assigned.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 1110 and MATH 1220 or higher (the MATH course may be taken concurrently).

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates and those graduate students admitted under the PCS (Permission to take Computer Science) classification.
    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CS 2000 - Programming Language Experience


    Details of a specific computer programming language are presented. The name of the specific language discussed will appear in the student’s transcript. Students obtain practice by writing programs in the language. This course assumes knowledge of the use of the computer system and editor and basic programming concepts. It is suitable for anyone wishing to learn the specific language being taught.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 1110 and (1-1/2 years of high school algebra or MATH 1110).

    Credits: 1 - 3 hours

    Notes: Course can be repeated for credit in a different language.
  
  • CS 2050 - Programming in Java


    Details of the Java computer programming language are presented. Students obtain practice by writing programs in Java. This course assumes knowledge of and experience using a computer system, editors, and programming concepts.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Programming experience in a structured high-level language.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • CS 2060 - Programming in Visual BASIC


    Details of the Visual BASIC computer programming language are presented. Students obtain practice by writing programs in Visual BASIC. This course assumes knowledge of and experience using a computer system, editors, and a programming language.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Programming experience in a structured high-level language and use of a MS Windows-based computer system.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • CS 2100 - Introductory Topics in Computing Technology


    A topics course presenting introductory computer science material suitable for credit in some undergraduate computer science major and minor programs. Topic can vary with each offering. The course can be repeated with different topics for credit.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
  • CS 2230 - Computer Organization and Assembly Language


    This course introduces concepts of computer architecture and assembly language. CISC and RISC instruction sets, along with associated hardware issues (e.g., data representation and instruction formats, instruction pipelining, register windows, context switching, and memory management) will be discussed. The student will program in both assembly language and the C programming language as well as interfacing the two languages.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 1110

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CS 2240 - System Programming Concepts


    Topics include: program development tools, basic testing, timing, profiling and benchmarking, characteristics of physical devices, memory management, device drivers, pseudo-devices, file structures, file I/O (both buffered and unbuffered), processes, shells, inter-process communications, signals, exceptions, pipes, sockets, shared memory and file and record locking. All topics are viewed from a UNIX system programming perspective.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CS 1120 and CS 2230.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CS 3310 - Data and File Structures


    This course focuses on the study of internal and external data structures and algorithms with an ongoing emphasis on the application of software engineering principles. Trees, graphs and the basic algorithms for creating, manipulating and using them will be studied. Various types of hash and indexed random access file structures will be discussed and implemented. B-trees and external file sorting will be introduced. Internal and external data and file organizations and algorithms will be compared and analyzed. Students will carry out a number of programming projects which will include the various interface (person-to-person, module-to-module, person-to-module-to-person) aspects of the software development process.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 1120 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CS 3400 - Graphical User Interface Development


    An introduction to the design and development of graphical user interfaces. The emphasis in the course is on event-driven code design and programming using GUI toolkits, with special emphasis on the design of interactive programs, web-based interaction, and the role of usability testing.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 1120.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CS 4020 - Introductory Microcomputer Concepts for Teachers


    This course is designed to provide teachers with a minimum foundation in computer concepts and programming. Emphasis is on the use of the BASIC language to perform a variety of educational applications on microcomputers. Computer terminology and capabilities are explored as well as the significance of computers in contemporary society. Students will write a number of programs and will receive an introduction to the use of standard system software. Flowcharting is introduced. Examples of Computer Assisted Instruction will be given. Not for Computer Science majors and minors (except teaching).

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: MATH 1500 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CS 4120 - Professional Field Experience


    This course allows students to receive academic credit for professional work experience in the computing field. The work activities must require significant computer science knowledge and education. This course may not be taken for work already completed and may not be used for computer science major or minor elective. It is a credit/no credit course and may be taken for a maximum of three credit hours.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CS 3310 or equivalent, and approval in advance by the Department.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
  • CS 4310 - Design and Analysis of Algorithms


    A continuation of the study of data structures and algorithms. It provides a theoretical foundation in designing algorithms. The focus is on the advanced analysis of algorithms and on how the selections of different data structures affect the performance of algorithms. Algorithmic paradigms such as divide and conquer, greedy method, dynamic programming, backtracking and branch and bound are covered. B-trees and 2 to 3 search trees and a variety of graph structures are discussed along with their applications to algorithm implementation. Algorithms will be analyzed for their complexity. NP-completeness will be introduced.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: MATH 1450 and CS 3310 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
  • CS 4430 - Database Management Systems


    This course presents fundamental concepts and practices of database management systems. Database environment and administration are defined along with roles of the database administrator and the data dictionary. Conceptual and logical models are discussed with emphasis on the relational approach. Data access techniques such as sequential and multi-level sequential indexes, linked lists, inverted files and hashing are briefly reviewed. A few commercial systems will be surveyed. Security, reliability and integrity will be studied. Students will acquire experience with the various topics by applying them to an actual database system. Students will also write application programs which use the database systems.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 3310.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: A student may not receive credit for both CS 4430 and CS 5430.
  
  • CS 4540 - Operating Systems


    The internal and external views of computer operating systems are presented. A historical survey of the development and growth of operating systems is given. Fundamentals of systems and system design are stressed. Basic concepts and terminology are emphasized. Processes, communications and synchronizations, deadlocks, scheduling, shared resources, resource allocation, and deallocation, memory management, files management, and protection are discussed. Applications to real systems are investigated to motivate the ideas presented. Students build or run simulations and modify the internals of a working operating system.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CS 2240 and CS 3310.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CS 4800 - Theory of Computation I: Automata


    An introduction to the theory of computation emphasizing automata and their applications in the specification of languages and computer systems.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CS 3310 and MATH 1450.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Spring
  
  • CS 4850 - Programming Languages


    Properties of various programming languages including scope of declarations, storage allocation, control structures and formal parameters will be studied, as well as run time representation of programs and data structures. A study of compilers and interpreters will be made. This will include loading, execution, storage allocation, symbol tables, lexical scan, parsing and object code generation. The relation of automata to formal languages and grammars will be discussed.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 3310

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CS 4900 - Software Systems Development I: Requirements and Design


    This course is the first of a capstone project sequence required for all computer science majors. Software engineering and its methodologies are explained. Various software life cycle models are introduced. Students are placed into teams and assigned to a client and project. The teams create a project plan, analyze and specify requirements for their project and develop a design. Prototype demonstrations and periodic oral and written progress reports are required to help assure steady progress. Individuals and teams produce a variety of documents throughout the course. Documents include a management plan, project abstracts, a requirements specification, a user interface prototype document, and a design document consisting of architectural and detailed design elements.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 3310

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course is approved as a writing-intensive course, which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.
    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CS 4910 - Software Systems Development II: Implementation and Testing


    This course is the second of a capstone project sequence required for all computer science majors. Students are placed into teams and assigned to complete an existing project for a client. The teams implement and debug code according to a design produced earlier. They produce a testing plan, carry out testing, record test results and summarize them. Prototype demonstrations and periodic progress reports are required to help assure steady progress. Individuals and teams produce a variety of documents throughout the course. These documents include a testing plan, a testing log, a summary of testing, a maintenance manual and a user manual. Teams also deliver a public demonstration at the end of the course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 4900

    Credits: 2 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • CS 4950 - Topics in Computer and Information Science


    The content of this course varies. It is intended to introduce the student to significant topics which are not normally offered as separate courses. This course may be taken more than once with the approval of the student’s advisor.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Approval of Department.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CS 4980 - The Computer Science Profession


    This course examines the role of the computer scientist in society. Topics covered are designed to promote awareness of professional, ethical, and societal issues in the field of computer science.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Senior status.

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Spring
  
  • CS 4990 - Undergraduate Research in Computer Science


    Supervised undergraduate research. Topics are chosen and arrangements are made on an individual student basis. With prior written approval, this course may be used for elective credit in the Theory and Analysis option of the B.S. degree in computer science. Students interested in CS 4990 should consult their department advisor or the department chair for details.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Department approval.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

    Notes: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of three hours. Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.
  
  • CS 5180 - Introduction to Computer Modeling and Simulation


    This course provides an overview of both model development and computer simulation. A methodology is introduced which is generally applicable to simulation projects. The relationships between real systems, models, and simulation are presented, and the concept of experimental frames is discussed. General purpose simulation languages (e.g., Simscript, GPSS, CSMP, Simula) and the formalisms they support are presented. An introduction to random variables and elementary frequency distributions is provided. Simulation as a tool for exploring ill-defined systems will also be discussed. Several small programs and a simulation project will be assigned the student.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CS 3310 and a course in probability or statistics.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CS 5250 - Computer Architecture


    General topics in computer architecture, memory systems design and evaluation, pipeline design techniques, RISC architectures, vector computers, VLSI systems architecture.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ECE 2500; CS 2230 or ECE 2510; and CS 3310.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CS 5260 - Parallel Computations I


    Parallel Computations I will cover architecture, synchronization and communication aspects of parallel and distributed systems. This course will focus on the design and analysis of algorithms which have a prototype treatment on current machines. These algorithms may include parallel sorting, combinatorial search, graph search and traversal, applications in graphics, 2-D finite differences, 2-D finite element techniques, matrix algorithms and the Fast Fourier Transform.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 3310.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CS 5270 - Theory of Computer Graphics


    A first course in the design of interactive computer graphics systems. Currently available hardware and software systems are described. Emphasis is on theoretical considerations in the design of interactive computer graphics software systems.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: MATH 2300 and CS 3310.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CS 5300 - Artificial Neural Systems


    An introduction to neural net concepts, algorithms, and applications. A history of neural nets will be presented along with some discussion of models of Biological neural systems. The salient features of neural nets (architecture, activation functions, weighting scheme) will be characterized. Standard algorithms will be presented including Hopfield nets, linear associative mode bidirectional associative memories, and adaptive resonance models. The student will use neural net software to experiment with standard models to develop an application for a project.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 3310.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: An introductory statistics course is recommended.
  
  • CS 5320 - Introduction to Evolutionary Computation


    Introduction to optimization algorithms which operate using the principles of Darwinian evolution. Both underlying theory and applications. Genetic algorithms, evolutionary programs, and evolution strategies. This course is cross-listed with ECE 5320.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 3310.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CS 5400 - Designing of User Interfaces


    An introduction to the specification, development, and evaluation of user interfaces. This course provides an overview of human capabilities, technological possibilities, interaction design, and interface evaluation. The course presents both the theoretical foundations of interaction design and practical case studies of good and bad interface design. During the course, students will design and test one or more interfaces.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CS 3400 or permission of instructor for undergraduate students.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: No prerequisite for graduate students in Computer Science.
  
  • CS 5410 - Game Programming


    This is a first course in game programming, emphasizing an overview of the field and an examination of core techniques, algorithms and technologies used to program games. The course will cover most areas of game programming, ranging from AI techniques to graphics.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  CS 3310 with a grade of “C” or better.

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: 3 hours
  
  • CS 5430 - Principles of Database Management Systems


    The fundamentals of database design and usage are covered, focusing on the relational data model. Topics include basic DB and DBMS concepts, logical design (ER modelling, normalization), physical storage concepts, relational algebra, SQL query language, PL/SQL and embedded SQL. A relational DBMS is used for lab assignments. Other topics may include query optimisation, transaction processing, concurrency, security, forms/reports, object-relational data model, and an overview of advanced DB topics. A student may not receive credit for both CS 4430 and CS 5430.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 3310.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CS 5550 - Computer Networks and Distributed Systems


    The design and evaluation of computer networks using current hardware and software are explained. Various types of computer buses, local area networks, and long haul networks are defined. Case studies of popular networks are presented. Layered network models are studied. There is lab work with local area and long haul networks.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CS 2240 and CS 3310.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CS 5600 - Software Requirements Analysis and Design


    This course provides in-depth study of notations, methodologies, and tools for analysis and design of software requirements. This course includes object-oriented requirement development and design, the relationships between object-oriented design concepts and software engineering principles. The course concentrates on the techniques used in the early stages of software development.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CS 3310.

    Credits: 3 hours

 

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