Feb 28, 2024  
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • AMS 5000 - Seminar in American Studies


    This course provides group study of special topics in American Studies. Topics will vary with the training and scholarship of the professor or professors involved.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: At least 12 hours of courses approved in the American Studies Program, including AMS 2000 and AMS 3000, or graduate-student status in any participating department.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • AMS 5900 - Interdisciplinary Theory and Methods


    This course will allow students to understand the development of American Studies from the early history and literature syntheses to the symbol and myth school to the social and cultural studies approaches that have drawn their techniques from anthropologists and other social and natural scientists.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: At least 18 hours of courses approved in the American Studies Program, including AMS 2000 and AMS 3000, or graduate-student status in any participating department.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • AMS 5980 - Independent Study


    An individual project is available to advanced students by special permission from the director of American Studies.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: At least 18 hours of courses approved in the American Studies Program, including AMS 2000 and AMS 3000, or graduate-student status in any participating department.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 1100 - Lost Worlds and Archaeology


    An introduction to the archaeological record relating to the development of culture from its stone age origins through the development of village agriculture and the beginnings of urban life.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 1200 - Peoples of the World


    A survey of the rich variety and range of non-Western peoples throughout the world, with emphasis on the role of culture in shaping human thought and behavior.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 1500 - Race, Biology, and Culture


    This course is an introduction to the anthropological study of human biological variation in modern populations. We will examine from a biocultural perspective how human populations adapt to life in difficult environments (e.g., tropics, high altitude, arctic) and in so doing, we will explore the biological and social meanings of human racial variation.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 2100 - Introduction to Archaeology


    The science of archaeology is explored in terms of the methods and concepts used to discover and interpret past human behavior. Select portions of the Old and New World prehistoric cultural sequences provide the frame of reference.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • ANTH 2400 - Principles of Cultural Anthropology


    An introduction to the basic concepts, theoretical approaches, and methodological strategies employed in the study of traditional and contemporary sociocultural systems throughout the world. Attention given to research techniques and the insights derived from detailed case studies and cross-cultural comparisons.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • ANTH 2500 - Introduction to Biological Anthropology


    A survey of physical anthropology; evolutionary theory; hominid and primate evolution; the living primates, human osteology, human genetics and population variation.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • ANTH 2600 - Sex, Gender, Culture


    Sexual differences around the world are culturally elaborated into gender-specific behaviors, normed relations between gender-coded people and objects, and various ideologies supporting the differences. In this course, biological and cross-cultural data will be used to explore the foundation of this process and the social, cultural, and psychological consequences of gender coding on men and women in different cultural settings.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
  
  • ANTH 3010 - Anthropology through Film


    Anthropology through Film is designed to introduce students to the concepts, methods, and practices of cultural anthropology through the viewing and analysis of ethnographic films and the reading of select ethnographic writings. A principal course objective is to learn how to analyze what the filmmaker has done well and what is lacking in the ethnographer’s portrayal of other cultures. Consequently, more general issues of representing other cultures will be considered in relation to the themes of power, the legacy of colonialism, and the world economic system.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3030 - Historical Archaeology


    Investigates the role of the material world in the colonial encounter and the development of capitalism. The course will integrate theoretical, methodological and substantive issues with an emphasis, though not exclusive focus, on North America. Prerequisite: ANTH 2100 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3060 - Archaeology of Civilization


    The course discusses the forces leading to the rise of the state and the emergence of centers of civilization. It investigates state emergence cross-culturally, examining shared characteristics and innovative pathways, social accomplishments and social costs, New World and Old World, far-flung and more recent past.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2100 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3090 - Archaeology of Inequality and Resistance


    The course examines the dynamics of historical and archaeologically known forms of control and domination based upon status, class, gender, and ethnicity. The course focuses on the social relation of oppressor and oppressed, the ideologies of control and the forms of social resistance.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2100 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3120 - Medicine and Culture


    This course takes an Anthropological approach to the study of illness and healing and provides a broad introduction to the field of medical anthropology. Included in this course are discussions of the various anthropological approaches to understanding illness and disease, with a particular focus on the ways in which culture impacts on how illness is understood and experienced both cross-culturally and in the United States. Special areas of interest may include ethnomedicine, the intersection of biomedicine and other healing systems, the impacts of inequality on health and health care, and the study of biomedicine as a cultural system.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 1200 or 2400, or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3390 - Cultures of Latin America


    This course offers an introduction to contemporary life in Latin America from an ethnographic perspective. Readings and class discussions will highlight the intersections of colonialism, nationalism and globalization among selected groups in different areas in the region. By locating contemporary societies within broader contexts this class aims to replace cultural stereotypes with anthropological analysis.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3400 - Cultures of Asia


    This course will provide an introduction to contemporary cultures and societies of Asia. Emphasis will be placed on topics such as education, family, workplaces, gender, popular culture, and identity. By locating contemporary institutions and idioms within a historical context, this class aims to replace cultural stereotypes with anthropological analysis.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3410 - Cultures of Africa


    This course offers an introduction to the study of contemporary life in sub-Saharan Africa. Students will engage with issues relating to colonialism, post-colonialism, and globalization as they explore several regions and ethnic groups in depth. A special emphasis will be placed on recognizing and dispelling long-held myths and negative stereotypes about Africa.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3420 - Cultures of Middle East


    A problem oriented approach to the study of peoples and cultures of the Middle East, dealing with rural, urban, peasant, and elite groups. Topics such as social structure, religion, and culture change may be included.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3430 - Cultures of Europe


    Students are introduced to the anthropology of Europe through a critical reading of selected ethnographies and essays. The importance of nationalism, self-identity and borders in contemporary European politics and social life will be emphasized. Students will also be exposed to literature on subaltern populations such as peasants and small-scale farmers and the political, economic and cultural dynamics to which they are subject.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3440 - The First Americans


    Examines indigenous or native cultures of North America from the initial peopling of the continent by immigrants from Asia during the Terminal Pleistocene (Ice Ages) into the period of European exploration and colonization. Selected topics illustrating the ingenuity and diversity of human responses to both changing landscapes and social circumstances over time and in space will be presented.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3450 - Topics in Anthropology


    An intensive study of selected topics or emerging fields in anthropology. Topics will vary and be announced each semester. May be repeated for credit with different topics.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3470 - Ethnicity/Multiculturalism


    A study of the diverse perspectives of the many different ethnic groups in the United States. In the course we will analyze the social tensions, group dynamics, and consequences resulting from the cultural and ethnic diversity existing here. Some of the discussion will focus on the medical, legal, social, and political institutions that exist in a multicultural environment.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 1200 or 1400 or 2400.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3480 - Gender and Plastic Bodies


    In U.S. society we tend to assume that there are two sexes - male and female. Even if we have learned that gender roles can change, as in expecting men to be more nurturing while more and more women pursue careers for example, we tend to accept that this is simply social change based on natural sexes. In this course we will focus on the United States with some cross-cultural comparisons in order to question this assumption of “natural” sexes as we explore physiological variations as they are culturally interpreted and understood and cultural interventions of “natural” sex. Thus, based on work in our own society and cross-culturally, we will focus our attention at and beyond the limits of sex and gender, examining: (1) the ways in which human societies interpret physiological variation; (2) transgender experiences and categories as they vary cross-culturally; (3) and the role of technology in (re)shaping the “natural” sexes. Whether we are considering cyborg bodies, virtual bodies, tattooed and pierced bodies, or bodies surgically altered in a stunning variety of ways, we will be asking what is “natural” and “unnatural” about the assumed biological categories of male and female.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3500 - Primate Evolution


    An introduction to the functional and evolutionary biology of the primates. An emphasis will be placed on the morphological adaptations characterizing primates throughout their nearly 60 million year evolutionary history.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2500 or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3510 - Human Osteology


    A study of the human skeleton. Emphasis will be on morphological and metrical variation, odontology, palaeopathology, and reconstruction of the individual and the population.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2500 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • ANTH 3520 - Faunal Analysis


    A hands-on undergraduate methodology course in the identification, analysis, and interpretation of animal bone found in archaeological contexts. Topics will include: taphonomy, quantitative estimation techniques, the relevance of animal behavior to hunting, predator-prey relationships, food transport behavior, subsistence and seasonality, reconstructing the palaeoenvironment, and the meaning of mortality patterns. The course will include both a lecture and a lab component.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Either ANTH 2100 or ANTH 2500, or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • ANTH 3530 - Bioarchaeology


    This course is an issues oriented undergraduate methodology course concerned with the analysis of human remains recovered from archaeological contexts. Topics of discussion include: mortuary practices, age categories and cohorts, assessing growth and development rates, indicators of population health, palaeodemography, palaeopathology, trauma and warfare, occupational indicators, trace elements, and problem solving with metric and/or non-metric variation. The focus of the course will be on extracting information from a human skeletal population in order to reconstruct features such as status differences and the reasons for population increase/decline.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ANTH 2100 and ANTH 2500, or permission of instructor. ANTH 3510 is also recommended.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3540 - Growth and Development


    Descriptive, analytical, and evolutionary approaches to the study of the physical growth and development of humans. Postnatal growth, endocrinology of growth, dental and skeletal development, and human diversity will all be explored from an anthropological and an evolutionary perspective. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3550 - Anthropology and Marxism


    This course will provide a critical analysis and historical overview of the Marxist tradition. Special attention will be given to comparing the various Marxist schools as well as outlining the neo-Marxist project and its importance for anthropology in particular and social sciences and humanities in general.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2400 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3560 - Food and Culture


    Are we what we eat or how we eat? How do we determine what is food and is not food? This course will examine food cross-culturally and explore the different ways in which human beings produce, distribute, consume and think about food. Special consideration will be given to issues such as the origins of food surpluses and famines, the emergence of global food commodity chains, and the rise of the organic industry.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 3580 - The African Diaspora: Peoples and Cultures


    The African Diaspora in the Americas, product of the transatlantic slave trade, has impacted every society in North America, the Caribbean, and Central and South America and has produced a diverse array of distinctive cultures and communities. And yet, the communities, cultures, and cultural influences of the African Diaspora are often neglected within the usual regional divisions of area studies courses, despite a solid tradition of anthropology dealing with the peoples and cultures of the African Diaspora. This body of research raises many issues at the cutting edge of anthropological thinking about the nature of cultural continuity and change, identity, consciousness and tradition, and the co-construction of race and nation, to list but a few. This course will introduce the work of pioneering anthropologists of the African Diaspora throughout the Americas, situating their work in the context of various intellectual and political currents of the 20th century, and tracing their legacy in contemporary anthropology and related fields, such as cultural studies and ethnohistory. Much of this recent work reconceptualizes an Atlantic World or “Black Atlantic” that is rich with contemporary interconnections and movements of people between points in the Americas, Europe, and Africa that complicate earlier notions of unidirectional influences from Africa to the New World. We will attempt to map a dialogue between anthropological work on African diasporic culture(s) (situated within the predominately white/Euro academy) and the political and social concerns and consciousness of Afro-American people themselves (not just U.S. African-American, but all of the Americas).

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Cross-listed with AFS 3580
  
  • ANTH 4000 - Midwest Prehistory


    A survey of developments in the midcontinent from the arrival of human populations during the Ice Ages to the point of European contact. Emphasis will be on changing adaptive requirements of the environment over time as reflected in subsistence-settlement behavior, interaction through exchange, and societal complexity.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2100 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 4040 - Early Technologies


    This course deals with the analysis and interpretation of early technologies and technological organization and their relationship to social, political, and economic dimensions of cultural systems.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2100 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 4050 - Archaeology of the Great Lake State


    Current interpretations of Native American lifeways in the western Great Lakes from the Paleo-Indian through Early Historic periods will be reviewed, with special attention to the State of Michigan. Cultural patterns observed by explorers, traders, and missionaries entering this region in the 17th century provide the frame of reference for an examination of changing strategies for survival reflected especially in the distribution of sites (communities) across the landscape and the nature of activities undertaken from them during the past 10,000 years.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2100 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 4390 - Issues in South American Ethnography


    Employing ethnographies about South America, this course is designed to acquaint students with various methodological, theoretical, and topical orientations in ethnographies of the region. Specific issues to be considered may include the cultures of indigenous peoples, religious practices and conversions, the lives of women in indigenous and cosmopolitan settings, ethnicity and race, and the effects of “modernization” on families, children, and health. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2400.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 4400 - Ethnography


    Examines various methods, problems, and issues in ethnographic research and writing, as well as the interaction between ethnographic practice and the development of anthropological theory. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2400 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 4500 - Primate Behavior and Ecology


    An advanced survey of the primates. Topics include: primate characteristics; taxonomy, constraints of body size on locomotion and diet; and primate social behavior in an ecological context. The behavioral ecology of individual species will be explored through readings, films, and when possible, direct behavior observation at a zoo. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum. Prerequisite: ANTH 2500 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 4720 - Slavery and Resistance


    This course explores the development of black slavery in the Americas from its African and European antecedents down through its eradication the nineteenth century. Attention will be given to the Caribbean, and to mainland North and South America, although some areas may receive more emphasis than others. We will adopt a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspective toward slavery. Anthropological, historical, archaeological, cliometric, Marxist, and other approaches to slave studies are examined in order to assess competing materialist and idealist viewpoints. The goal is to identify common themes and characteristics of slavery in different historical and cross-cultural contexts.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 4750 - Language and Identity


    This course explores the links between identity and language. Students will examine how different types of identity get mobilized by different ways of speaking and by judgments about the social value of different speech styles. A semester-long research project comprised of short field research assignments will allow students to apply linguistic anthropology methods to examine the speech differences that surround us.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course fulfills the baccalaureate-level writing requirement.
  
  • ANTH 4800 - Garbage: Humans and their Refuge


    What happens when you flush the toilet? Why does that question make Americans squeamish? This course examines the various ways that human societies have categorized polluting substances and the various technologies and symbolic practices they have used to place materials outside the boundaries of acceptable sociality.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 4900 - Archaeological Field School


    Archaeological investigation of specific problems relating to the prehistory or history of a particular area (e.g. southwest Michigan, Lower Mississippi Valley). Participants will receive instruction in collecting and evaluating background information, creating a research design and implementing archaeological field-work (i.e., logistics, site location survey, mapping, recovering objects from archaeological contexts), and processing and curating data for analysis and interpretation in the laboratory. May be repeated with permission of instructor, but does not count toward the anthropology major or minor twice.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2100 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 6 hours

  
  • ANTH 4980 - Independent Readings in Anthropology


    Students may contact a faculty member to undertake independent readings on a specific topic of interest. The student should have some familiarity with the topic in advance. The purpose of the course is to allow the student to gain a greater depth of knowledge in a topic not offered in a formal course. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and a declared major or minor in anthropology.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 4990 - Independent Research in Anthropology


    Students may contact a faculty member to conduct research under the guidance of the faculty member. Before the initiation of the research a literature search and a written proposal must be prepared. At the conclusion of the research project, a written report will be submitted to the guiding faculty member.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and a declared major or minor in anthropology.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
  • ANTH 5000 - Topics in Archaeology


    A consideration of the prehistory of a particular geographic area (e.g. the southwestern United States, the Circumpolar) or of selected theoretical problems (e.g. artifact typology, prehistoric ecology). The topic to be studied will be announced each semester. (May be repeated for credit).

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 1100 or 2100.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5010 - The Rise of Civilization


    The archaeological sequence in one or more of the nuclear centers of prehistoric civilization will be considered in some detail. The course may focus intensively upon one area (e.g. the Near East or Meso-America), or it may give equal emphasis to two or more areas in a comparative framework.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior standing, 12 hours of anthropology and ANTH 2100 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5020 - The Origins of Agriculture


    An intensive study of the human transition from hunting-gathering to cultivation during the post-Pleistocene period. Topics to be treated include: both archaeological and botanical models to explain these processes; the comparison of agricultural systems in various parts of the world; the geographic distribution and biosystematics of selected cultivars; and the cultural systems which have arisen from the economic foundations of plant domestication.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior standing, 12 hours of anthropology, and ANTH 1100 or 2100.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5050 - Social Archaeology


    Investigates the mechanisms of social, political, and economic integration within human social groups by analyzing and interpreting the material world. Focus will vary between communal and complex social forms.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior standing, 12 hours of anthropology, and ANTH 2100 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5060 - The Archaeology of Gender


    Gender constructs, a critical organizing principle for human interaction, are becoming an important focus for archaeological investigation. This course will explore the multiple ways archaeologists have attempted to use gender relations as a means to gain insights into individual societies. We will follow gender as an archaeological concept historically and conceptually. Participants will explore the attempts and successes of a gendered understanding of the archaeological record.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ANTH 2100, junior standing, and 12 hours in anthropology.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5070 - Gender Theories


    This course examines the dialogue between anthropologists, feminists theorists and post-structuralists over the course of the 20th century. Beginning with path-breaking works by Margaret Mead and Simone de Beauvoir the course teases out the role that ethnographic scholarship has played in some of the major intellectual debates of the late 20th century, including subjectivity/objectivity and sex/gender.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5100 - Human Biology


    An advanced course in the method and theory involved in the study of the biology of Homo sapiens. Aspects of Human Biology that will be studied from a biocultural perspective include growth and development, infectious disease, nutrition, adaptation to stressful environments, genetics, and demography.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior/senior status and 12 hours of Anthropology, including ANTH 2500 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5200 - Anthropological Theory


    Students are introduced to anthropological theory as a means of raising questions that are significant to the social sciences in general. The importance of theory to ethnographic research and a critical understanding of the social world will be emphasized. The course will also focus on the historical and political roots of anthropology through comparing select theorists from the early British, French, and American schools. Special attention will be given to current theoretical controversies that continue to define the political and ethical concerns of working with human subjects.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior/senior status and 12 hours of Anthropology, including ANTH 2400 or social science equivalent.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5210 - Nationalism, Invented Tradition, and Self-Identity


    This course introduces students to the theoretical debates concerning nationalism by evaluating the works of authors such as Anderson, Hobsbawm, and Gellner and by examining select case studies of nationalism in a number of world areas. Emphasis will be on nationalism as a cultural as well as political process so its relation to invented tradition and self-identity will be highlighted.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ANTH 2400, graduate standing or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5220 - Poverty, Power, and Privilege


    This course critically explores anthropological approaches to understanding poverty as well as racial, class, and sexual inequalities. The course emphasizes inequalities within the contemporary United States, but situates those dynamics within an analysis of global processes and conditions. Particular emphasis is placed on analyzing ways that everyday practices, neoliberal social policies, economic restructuring, resistance efforts, and institutional practices play in producing, challenging, and maintaining structural violence. Feminist, post-structuralist, Marxist, cultural studies, and hegemony studies approaches are covered. Both ethnographic case studies and theoretical analysis are explored to inform collaborative required applied community based anthropological research on power, race, and class relations within the Kalamazoo region.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior/senior status and 12 hours of Anthropology.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5250 - Spirits and Medicine


    This course explores how healing is linked to belief and in turn how beliefs about well-being, illness, and treatment are culturally prefigured. Students will examine healing practices in the United States and cross-culturally as they related to belief and consciousness, including western medicine and alternatives, spirit possession and trance, and methods of divination.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior status, 12 hours of anthropology, and ANTH 2400 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5300 - Research Methods


    An in depth consideration of the research methods and tools of the modern anthropologist. An emphasis on methods and techniques of data collection, statistical analysis, and graphic presentation of a wide variety of anthropological data.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior/senior status and 12 hours of Anthropology.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5310 - Medical Anthropology


    This course starts with the premise that illness is as much a cultural as it is a biological phenomena and explores the ways in which different societies, including our own, perceive and manage illness and disease. The primary focus of the course is to understand the intersection of cultural, social, and political variables in the experience of illness and the practices associated with healing. Specific topics include: ethnomedicine, spiritual healing, primary health care in the developing world, the symbolism of modern medicine, the political economy of health care and AIDS, and inequality.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior status, 12 hours of anthropology, and ANTH 2400 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5350 - Ethnohistory and Archaeology of the Caribbean


    The Caribbean is a region of some 30 million people living in the islands stretching from the Bahamas to Trinidad, as well as the continental enclaves of Belize, Surinam, Guyana, and French Guiana. Despite its great cultural, racial, and linguistic diversity, the Caribbean exhibits certain broad social and economic similarities born of its history of slavery and colonialism. Using a wide range of archaeological, documentary, and ethnographic sources, this course seeks to identify common themes in the cultural history of the Caribbean. We will explore the way Indian, European, African, and Asian cultures merged in the Caribbean to create distinct Creole societies. We will examine culture contact between Europeans and the native peoples of the Caribbean and look at the social and economic impact of sugar production on the region. Most importantly, we will investigate the rise and fall of Caribbean slavery. In the early session, students will be introduced to the Caribbean region. Students will also be given some rudimentary instruction in ethnohistorical methods, emphasizing archaeological contributions to the ethnohistorical approach.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior/senior status and 12 hours of Anthropology.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5400 - Ethnographic Research Methods


    An exploration of the complexity of ethnographic research methods through a practice oriented approach to training in ethnographic approaches. Students learn a range of qualitative research methods as well as the political, ethical, methodological, and theoretical dilemmas of anthropological fieldwork and writing through supervised fieldwork projects as well as classroom assignments.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior/senior status, 12 hours of Anthropology, and ANTH 2400 or consent of instructor..

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5450 - Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology


    An intensive study of the cultures of an area of the world or selected problems. Topics will be announced each semester. (May be repeated for credit.)

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior standing, 12 hours of anthropology, and ANTH 2400 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5500 - Human Evolution


    This course is designed to provide students with an intensive examination of the human fossil record from the initial divergence of the hominid lineage to the origin of modern homo sapiens . Emphasized in this course will be paleontological theory, issues relating to species definition and recognition, functional anatomical complexes, adaptive processes, and human morphological variation.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ANTH 2500, junior standing, and 12 hours anthropology.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5550 - Topics in Biological Anthropology


    A consideration of the biological relationships of specific population groups or general problems in human biology (e.g. human genetics, human growth and constitution, palaeopathology, dental anthropology). Topic will be announced each semester. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior standing, 12 hours of anthropology, and ANTH 2500 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ANTH 5830 - Anthropology and History


    The course evaluates the relationship between anthropology and history through reading selected works in each discipline. Theoretical and methodological similarities and differences will be addressed as well as how each discipline writes about the “other.” Special attention will be given to the rhetorical devices employed to make ethnographic and historical accounts convincing and the potential to critical scholarship that the ongoing exchange between the two disciplines offers.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ANTH 2400, graduate standing or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior status and 12 hours of course work in anthropology, including the specified prerequisite for each class.
  
  • ARAB 1000 - Basic Arabic I


    Fundamentals of modern Arabic with emphasis on listening and speaking skills.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • ARAB 1010 - Basic Arabic II


    Continuation of ARAB 1000.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ARAB 1000.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • ARAB 2000 - Intermediate Arabic I


    The development of written and spoken expression in modern Arabic with an emphasis on grammar review.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ARAB 1010.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • ARAB 2010 - Intermediate Arabic II


    Continuation of ARAB 2000.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ARAB 2000.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • ARAB 2750 - Life and Culture of the Arabs


    This course introduces specific elements of life and culture in the Arab World, past and present. Those elements include history, religions, geography, languages, arts, politics, and literatures. The course will be offered in English with no prerequisites and will be open for the general student body. The course seeks to create a link between the Arabic language and the culture that provides its natural context. The aim is to provide students with an informed and balanced view of some of the pressing aspects of Arab life and culture, and to do so in such a way as to demonstrate the uniqueness and yet diversity of Arabic sub-cultures on the one hand, and the universality of the Arab culture(s) on the other.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ARAB 3000 - Advanced Standard Arabic I


    Emphasis on increasing the student’s command of Modern Standard Arabic with focus on media and expository writing.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ARAB 2010 or instructor’s permission.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
  • ARAB 3010 - Advanced Standard Arabic II


    Continuation of Arabic 3000 with achievement of advanced-level communicative competence in Modern Standard Arabic with focus on literature and research writing.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ARAB 3000 or instructor’s permission.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Spring
  
  • ARAB 4760 - Foreign Study - non WMU


    Student participation in pre-approved program of study abroad that is not through Western Michigan University.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  Prior approval of departmental advisor or chairperson.

    Credits: 1 - 16 hours

    Notes: Repeatable for credit up to 32 credit hours.
  
  • ARAB 4770 - Arabic Foreign Study


    Student participation in a departmentally approved program of study abroad. Repeatable for credit up to 32 credit hours.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Prior permission of departmental advisor and chairperson.

    Credits: 1 to 16 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  
  • ARAB 5030 - Arabic - English Translation Practicum


    This is a practical course to teach the skills for translating texts from Arabic into English. The objective of this course is to develop further language proficiency and to introduce students to the nuts and bolts of translation. Students will produce English translations from different sorts of Arabic texts, such as news, essays, documents, poetry, and short fiction.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  ARAB 2010 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 1 - 4 hours

    Notes: May be repeated for credit. Open to Upperclass and Graduate students.
  
  • ARAB 5200 - Topics in Arabic Linguistics and Language Science


    The advanced study of a language or a group of languages from a scientific point of view, such as the function and status of languages in society, the comparative history of different language families or the manipulation of language for pragmatic needs across cultures. 

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Completion of 4 courses in area of specialization.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ARAB 5500 - Independent Study in Arabic


    Directed individual study of a specific topic in Arabic literature or linguistics. Repeatable for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ARAB 1010 and instructor’s permission.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
  • ART 1040 - Object Drawing


    This course focuses on drawing as a vehicle for thinking, seeing and communicating. Work includes drawing from direct observation. Students learn to analyze drawings and improve compositional skills, drawing techniques and methods. The properties of line, value, texture, shape and space are dealt with as elemental to the drawing process. An ability to render and draw expressively, in a variety of materials, is stressed.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ART and ART Education majors and minors only.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 1050 - Drawing Studio


    This course focuses on the drawing experience as a vehicle for art-making, as a process and to convey ideas. Different types of image-making processes are studied, along with their potentials for meaning. Students learn to invent from observation and imagination, and to assemble disparate information in various types of space. There is also an introduction to historical and contemporary drawing practice from many traditions.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ART and ART Education majors and minors only.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 1070 - Form and Surface


    This course places emphasis on the development of creative thinking as a vehicle to achieve both communication of content and visual expression. A focus is placed on two-dimensional problem solving, conceptualization and implementation through exposure to a variety of materials, processes, and methodologies.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ART and ART Education majors and minors only.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 1080 - Form and Space


    This course places emphasis on the development of creative thinking as a vehicle to achieve both communication of content and visual expression. A focus is placed on three-dimensional problem solving, conceptualization and implementation through exposure to a variety of materials, processes and methodologies.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ART and ART Education majors and minors only.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 1140 - Digital Media in the Arts


    This course will introduce students in Art to the audio, graphics, video and other digital tools used by professionals in the arts. All instruction will be delivered on-line, and students must have a WMU email account before the first class of the semester. Course assignments will be comprised primarily of projects created in the various open computer labs within the College of Fine Arts. The course will be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis. Open only to majors in the School of Art. This course will fulfill the College of Fine Art’s computer literacy graduation requirement.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Open only to Art majors.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 1200 - Introduction to Art


    A topical introduction to the visual arts: painting, architecture, sculpture and the crafts. Discussions and slide presentations on such themes as the meaning of modern art, art as cultural and sociological expression, as symbol, as play and as form. This course will enable the non-art student to develop an art vocabulary and gain insights into our human quest for creative expression. This course meets Area I, Fine Arts, General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 1300 - Studio Experience - (3-D)


    A course designed for the non-art student as an enriching experience in three-dimensional media to include clay, wood, metal, and other sculptural material. This course may not be elected by majors or minors in art or art education. It is designed primarily for the general university student who wishes to have some experience in art. This course meets Area I, Fine Arts, General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 1400 - Studio Experience - (2-D)


    A course designed for the non-art student as an enriching experience in two-dimensional media to include painting, drawing and other graphic media. May not be elected by majors or minors in art or art education. This course meets Area I, Fine Arts, General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 1480 - Direct Encounter with the Arts


    A course that uses a direct approach to introduce students to their cultural world by guiding them through first-hand experiences in a number of areas: cinema, photography, theatre, sculpture, music, poetry, dance and architecture. Classroom discussions are held following the student’s participation in the various art events scheduled each semester, with students expected to write journals and response papers about the major events of the course. There will be a course charge in lieu of textbooks. Cross-listed with DANCE 1480, MUS 1480, THEA 1480. May be taken only once from College of Fine Arts Departments. This course meets Area I, Fine Arts, General Education requirement.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • ART 2000 - The Creative Process Through Art


    Individual involvement in the creative process related to human growth and development by means of exploration with many art media. This course waives the ART 1500 requirement for the Elementary Education majors.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2100 - Life Drawing


    The study of the essential aspects of life drawing (such as gesture, contour, proportions, anatomy, structure, and articulation) and their synthesis into a coherent drawing attitude.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ART 1040, ART 1050, ART 1070, ART 1080.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2200 - History of Art


    An historical survey of art from prehistoric ages to the Renaissance. This course meets Area I, Fine Arts, General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2210 - History of Art


    An historical survey of art from the Renaissance through the contemporary period. This course meets Area I, Fine Arts, General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2220 - Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas


    A survey of the diversity of media forms and context within which Africans, Pacific Islanders and Native Americans make and use art, including contemporary expressions. Art will be discussed in relation to wider cultural contexts, historical and political ideas, and aesthetic approaches.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2230 - Introduction to Asian Art History


    This course will investigate the history of Asian art from the prehistoric to the modern periods, including arts of the cultures of China, Japan, Korea, East Asia and India. Art will be discussed in relation to wider cultural contexts, historical and political ideas, and aesthetic approaches.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2300 - Ceramics


    A course devoted to a survey of pottery processes, including handbuilding, technical information and a limited experience with the potter’s wheel.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ART 1040, ART 1050, ART 1070, ART 1080.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2310 - Sculpture


    A fundamental course in sculpture exploring the theories and concepts of three-dimensional art forms in space. Mechanical, structural and compositional principles will be studied. An overview of historical sculptural forms will be presented.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ART 1040, ART 1050, ART 1070, ART 1080.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2380 - Jewelry and Metalsmithing


    A survey of jewelry projects with instruction in design and metal craft. Copper, brass, and sterling are the principal materials. Basic stone setting and casting procedures are usually included. Students generally fashion several jewelry pieces in this class.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ART 1040, ART 1050, ART 1070, ART 1080.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2400 - Painting I


    A fundamental course in oil painting to assist the student in realizing visual observations, compositional sensitivities, and personal expression through basic painting techniques. Seeing color, mixing color, and making specific color decisions are the vehicles for studying basic painting methods and space. An overview of historical painting styles will be presented.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ART 1040, ART 1050, ART 1070, ART 1080.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2410 - Intaglio and Relief


    A fundamental exposure to the techniques of Intaglio and Relief printing and an introduction to print aesthetics.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ART 1040, ART 1050, ART 1070, ART 1080.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2420 - Watercolor Painting


    A survey of the application, techniques, and limitations of the watercolor painting medium.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ART 1040, ART 1050, ART 1070, ART 1080.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2430 - Lithography


    A basic introduction to Lithography through aluminum plate techniques. Fundamental discussion of stone lithography and aesthetic possibilities of the medium.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ART 1040, ART 1050, ART 1070, ART 1080.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2440 - Hand Papermaking


    An introduction to the basic techniques of hand papermaking as an art form.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BA and BFA art majors and minors only.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2450 - Graphic Design-Non BFA in Graphic Design


    An introduction to problem-solving for visual communication through typographic images. The fundamentals of calligraphy, typography, and typographic design are investigated in experimental and practical projects. Incorporates research in the communicative potential of color and structure.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ART 1040, ART 1050, ART 1070, ART 1080.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ART 2460 - Screenprint


    Introduction to screenprint fundamentals, techniques and procedures, exploring at length the expressive potentials of the medium-to include basic color printing procedures.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ART 1040, ART 1050, ART 1070, ART 1080.

    Credits: 3 hours

 

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