Apr 21, 2024  
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • FIN 4250 - Short Term Financial Management


    An analytical approach to the study of short term financial management. In connection with Treasury Management Association this course is the Certified Cash Manager Associate Program (CCMA). An emphasis is placed on the working capital topics specifically addressed in this program. In addition to the practical emphasis of the CCMA approach the course will include the theoretical underpinnings of short term financial management utilizing cases and lectures to fully cover financial decision making in the area of working capital management, financial analysis, and forecasting.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FIN 3200.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FIN 4260 - Corporate Finance: Theory and Practice


    An analytical approach to the study of the concepts and theories underlying the financial decisions of corporations and business enterprises. In addition to theoretical framework, the course includes cases covering financial decision making processes in the areas of capital budgeting, long-term financing decisions, financial structure, cost of capital, dividend policy, merger, corporate restructuring and valuation.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FIN 3200.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FIN 4320 - Real Estate Investments


    The effect of various forms of taxation, market conditions and governmental policies as they affect the investor’s spendable income are reviewed.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: FIN 3200

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FIN 4330 - Real Estate Appraisal


    A study of the sources of real estate value, the techniques for estimating property value, and the effective use of appraisal information.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: FIN 3200

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FIN 4370 - Real Estate Management


    Management of income producing properties as an agent of the owner. Consideration of professional standards, business promotion, leasing, insurance and maintenance.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FIN 3200.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FIN 4420 - International Finance


    A study of contemporary problems in international finance. The course examines the international money markets, working capital considerations and capital budgeting problems as faced by the multinational corporation.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FIN 3200 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FIN 4480 - Internships in Finance


    Under the direction of a faculty advisor, students obtain employment experience with industrial, commercial, and financial enterprises (commercial banks, brokerage firms, etc.), with insurance companies or firms with an insurance division or department, or with a real estate firm or enterprises with a real estate department or division. Students are required to file periodic reports to the advisor. In addition, the firm’s executives evaluate them. Available only to students majoring in finance or minoring in finance, insurance, or real estate. No more than 3 hrs. can be used as credit toward a major or minor. Written consent of instructor and department chair is required. (May be substituted for BUS 3900 Business Internship.)

    Credits: 1 to 5 hours

  
  • FIN 4530 - Securities Analysis


    An analysis of stocks and bonds as investment vehicles. The course is designed as a sophisticated analysis of valuation techniques with a view towards aiding the student to bridge the gaps between techniques used by the academician and the practitioner.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FIN 3510.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FIN 4630 - Risk Management and Insurance


    This course covers the function of risk management and the responsibilities of risk managers. The sources of risk information are examined, the business risks analyzed and the alternative methods of handling risks evaluated. Criteria for selection of proper insurance coverages and selection of carriers and intermediaries are reviewed.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FIN 3600 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FIN 4980 - Readings and Research in Finance


    Directed individual study of finance or legal problems which are not treated in departmental course offerings.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor and department chair is required.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
  • FREN 1000 - Basic French I


    Fundamentals of French with audiolingual emphasis. French cultural readings.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • FREN 1010 - Basic French II


    Continuation of 1000.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FREN 1000 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • FREN 2000 - Intermediate French I


    The development of spoken and written expression in the French language with an emphasis on grammar review.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FREN 1010 or two years of high school French, or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • FREN 2010 - Intermediate French II


    The continued development of spoken and written expression in the French language through readings and discussions of civilization and culture materials.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FREN 2000 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • FREN 2750 - Francophone Culture


    This course, taught in English, is an introduction to various aspects of the culture of non-European countries and regions in which the French language plays a significant role. It will offer a critical and historical perspective on the cultural and social effects of colonialism and decolonialism. This course does not count toward a French major or minor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FREN 3160 - Introduction to Advanced French Studies


    A review of French structure, form and use; focus on the development of communicative competence and on grammatical difficulties encountered by non-native users. Emphasis on the development of academic writing and speaking skills in preparation for content courses.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: FREN 2000 and 2010 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • FREN 3170 - French Conversation


    Exercises to develop ease and accuracy in the use of everyday French. Emphasis on oral aspects of the language.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FREN 2010 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • FREN 3200 - French Phonetics


    Study and practice to correct typical difficulties encountered by students of French with Anglo-American patterns of pronunciation; also to study the teaching of French patterns.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FREN 2000 or equivalent. (FREN 3200 may be taken concurrently with FREN 2010.)

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FREN 3220 - Life and Culture in France


    A study of French civilization based on historical, geographical, literary considerations and art and how those factors illustrate the character and traditions of French people from the medieval period through the present day.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FREN 3160.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FREN 3230 - Life and Culture in the Francophone World


    An introduction to French-speaking culture outside France, as seen primarily through literary texts. Students will become acquainted with various aspects of life in French-speaking communities both past and present.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FREN 3160.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FREN 3240 - French Language and Society: Business in France


    Course on contemporary French language and society as they relate to commerce, including business communications and practices in France. Intensive practice of written and oral French. Taught in French.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FREN 3160.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FREN 3250 - Close Reading In French


    Prose and verse readings of intrinsic literary and cultural merit, with emphasis on strategies for literary analysis.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FREN 3160.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FREN 3260 - Introduction to the Study of French Linguistics


    A general survey of the different fields of French linguistics, both theoretical (e.g., phonology, syntax) and applied (acquisition, sociolinguistics, dialectology). Prepares student for more specialized studies.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FREN 3160.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FREN 3440 - Summer Study in France


    A summer study program of French language, literature and culture. The course consists of formal study at a French university with regularly scheduled lectures and discussions in the French language. University study is supplemented by an organized tour of Paris with full explanations by an instructor of all points visited. Each student submits a term paper investigating one phase of his/her experience.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FREN 2000 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 7 hours

  
  • FREN 4520 - Reading and Writing in French


    Study of a limited number of literary texts as a contextual framework for review of French grammatical structures and practice in composition.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: FREN 3160, FREN 3250.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FREN 4530 - Themes in French/Francophone Culture


    Intensive development of communicative competence in French, oriented around the investigation and discussion of a theme or themes culturally relevant to French or Francophone societies (e.g., revolution past and present, decolonialisation, gender issues).

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FREN 3160.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FREN 4760 - Foreign Study - non WMU


    Student participation in pre-approved program of study abroad that is not through Western Michigan University.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  Prior approval of departmental advisor or chairperson.

    Credits: 1 - 16 hours

    Notes: Repeatable for credit up to 32 credit hours.
  
  • FREN 4770 - Foreign Study


    Student participation in a departmentally approved program of study abroad. Repeatable for credit up to 32 credit hours.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Prior permission of departmental advisor and chairperson.

    Credits: Variable

    When Offered: (Fall-Winter 1 to 16 hours) Spring-Summer 1 to 8 hours
  
  • FREN 4900 - Studies in French Linguistics


    Topics vary according to area and will be announced. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: FREN 3160, FREN 3260 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • FREN 5000 - Elementary French for Reading Proficiency


    Intensive grammar and elementary reading for translation and research purposes. The course is primarily for the graduate who has had little or no study in the language. However, undergraduates who desire a thorough reading knowledge may also apply. Undergraduates must secure permission of department. No oral work. This course does not count toward a major or minor in French.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: 5000-level courses may be taken only by advanced undergraduate students. Advanced undergraduate students are defined as those who have satisfactorily completed a minimum of four courses, or equivalent, applicable toward a major or minor in any one language. Each course, however, may have more specific and/or additional prerequisites.
  
  • FREN 5010 - Intermediate French for Reading Proficiency


    Readings in the language at intermediate and advanced levels for translation and research purposes. Special attention will be given to students’ major fields. Completion of FREN 5010 with a minimum of “B” constitutes graduate proficiency in the language. Undergraduates must secure permission of the Department. This course does not count toward a major or minor in French.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: 5000-level courses may be taken only by advanced undergraduate students. Advanced undergraduate students are defined as those who have satisfactorily completed a minimum of four courses, or equivalent, applicable toward a major or minor in any one language. Each course, however, may have more specific and/or additional prerequisites.
  
  • FREN 5030 - French - English Translation Practicum


    This is a practical course to teach the skills for translating texts from French into English. The objective of this course is to develop further language proficiency and to introduce students to the nuts and bolts of translation. Students will produce English translations from different sorts of French texts, such as news, essays, documents, poetry, and short fiction.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  FREN 2010 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 1 - 4 hours

    Notes: May be repeated for credit. Open to Upperclass and Graduate students.
  
  • FREN 5100 - Studies in French and Francophone Culture


    An intensive study of selected aspects of French and Francophone culture. Course varies according to topic and may be repeated for credit with permission of advisor. Representative topics might include Women in French Society, The French Tradition in Quebec, Francophone Cinema.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: FREN 3160 and 3220 or 3230 or 3250.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: 5000-level courses may be taken only by advanced undergraduate students. Advanced undergraduate students are defined as those who have satisfactorily completed a minimum of four courses, or equivalent, applicable toward a major or minor in any one language. Each course, however, may have more specific and/or additional prerequisites.
  
  • FREN 5200 - Topics in French Linguistics and Language Science


    The advanced study of a language or a group of languages from a scientific point of view, such as the function and status of languages in society, the comparative history of different language families or the manipulation of language for pragmatic needs across cultures. May be offered as ARAB/CHIN/FREN/GER/ GREK/ITAL/JPNS/LAT/RUSS 5200.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Completion of 4 courses in area of specialization.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: 5000-level courses may be taken only by advanced undergraduate students. Advanced undergraduate students are defined as those who have satisfactorily completed a minimum of four courses, or equivalent, applicable toward a major or minor in any one language. Each course, however, may have more specific and/or additional prerequisites.
  
  • FREN 5280 - French Literature from the Middle Ages to the Revolution


    The study of selected literary texts from the Middle Ages to the end of the eighteenth century.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: FREN 3160, 3250.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: 5000-level courses may be taken only by advanced undergraduate students. Advanced undergraduate students are defined as those who have satisfactorily completed a minimum of four courses, or equivalent, applicable toward a major or minor in any one language. Each course, however, may have more specific and/or additional prerequisites.
  
  • FREN 5290 - French Literature from the Revolution to the Present


    The study of selected literary texts from the late eighteenth century to the present.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: FREN 3160, 3250.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: 5000-level courses may be taken only by advanced undergraduate students. Advanced undergraduate students are defined as those who have satisfactorily completed a minimum of four courses, or equivalent, applicable toward a major or minor in any one language. Each course, however, may have more specific and/or additional prerequisites.
  
  • FREN 5500 - Independent Study in French


    Directed individual study of a specific topic in a French literary or linguistic area. Departmental approval required for admission. Repeatable for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: One 5000-level course in the major; a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in the major. Not open to minors.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

    Notes: 5000-level courses may be taken only by advanced undergraduate students. Advanced undergraduate students are defined as those who have satisfactorily completed a minimum of four courses, or equivalent, applicable toward a major or minor in any one language. Each course, however, may have more specific and/or additional prerequisites.
  
  • FREN 5600 - Advanced Readings in French


    Topics of literary, cultural, or linguistic merit will be analyzed. Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: FREN 3160, 3250.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: 5000-level courses may be taken only by advanced undergraduate students. Advanced undergraduate students are defined as those who have satisfactorily completed a minimum of four courses, or equivalent, applicable toward a major or minor in any one language. Each course, however, may have more specific and/or additional prerequisites.
  
  • FYE 2100 - First-Year Experience


    The First-Year Experience seminar is designed to help students develop a sense of responsibility for their own education and learning. This seminar will introduce students to University resources and will provide support during the first semester of transition to the University. Taught in a small group setting, students will interact with a faculty member and a student leader two times a week. The FYE 2100 seminar will include weekly class meetings, sharing a common reading and research experience, project-based assignment, written assignments, and attendance at selected University events. The importance of writing skills, critical thinking skills, communication skills, and study skills will be emphasized. FYE 2100 will be offered during Fall semester and is restricted to freshmen. The course may not be repeated and students will receive a letter grade for this course.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • GEOG 1000 - World Ecological Problems and Man


    (Science credit) Geographers have long been concerned with studying the interactions between human beings and the environment. The major focus of these investigations today is concerned with misuse of the environment, which has led to the present day environmental crisis. The introductory course combines scientific and non-technical appraisals of processes and problems dealing with the question of environmental quality. Therefore, humanity will be studied in the physical as well as the social setting. Though major issues may vary for developing and developed nations, topics concerned with population pressure, pollution, and urbanization will be among those considered.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • GEOG 1020 - World Geography Through Media and Maps


    This course presents an introduction to the geography of the earth. This includes the earth as the home of humans, major urban concentrations, descriptive physical characteristics of continents and countries, political subdivision, and general man-land relationships which reflect cultural preferences. Information delivery will be through textual material with a major concentration of carefully selected audiovisual and map study activities to enhance investigating the character of distant places.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 1050 - Physical Geography


    (Science credit) A study of the physical environmental systems of our earth. The course examines the seasonal and latitudinal distribution of solar energy; analyzes the many elements of weather, climate, vegetation, and soils; and finally considers the earth’s major landforms and the processes which shape them. Though each topic is treated separately, this course demonstrates the basic relationships among these topics and points out the human implications in all physical earth systems. Map use and laboratory work is an integral part of this course.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • GEOG 1900 - Earth Science for Elementary Educators I


    This is a laboratory-Based course specifically designed for prospective elementary teachers. The objectives of the course are to aid students in developing meaningful and functional understanding of key earth science concepts and their interrelations; to provide students with open-ended problem solving environments that facilitate insight in the nature of science as an intellectual activity; explore alternate conceptions of scientific phenomena; to help students develop more positive attitudes about science and increase their confidence in their ability to do science.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 2040 - National Park Landscapes


    (Science credit) Introduction to the physical and human landscapes of the national park system. Consideration of those natural and human processes which have produced the distinctive features of the national parks. Evolution of the national park concept, policies, and problems.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 2050 - Human Geography


    This course is an introduction to the study and analysis of humans in the landscape. We will look at how people perceive space, how they interact in space, and how space really matters to the study of everything. The course will touch on concepts in history, economics, demographics, the environment, culture, politics, agriculture and planning. We will look at impacts of technology on human to human and human to environment interaction and will also examine opportunities for future work in the field of Geography.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences.
  
  • GEOG 2250 - Introduction to Meteorology and Climatology


    (Science credit) A non-mathematical analysis of atmospheric behavior. The fundamental physical laws affecting the elements of weather - solar radiation, temperature, moisture, pressure, and winds are examined during the first half of the course. Weather systems and forecasting, atmospheric optics, climatic change, and regional climates are examined during the second half of the course. Laboratory meetings dealing with instrumentation and weather map analysis are an integral part of the course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: GEOG 105 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • GEOG 2440 - Economic Geography


    This course reviews the spatial processes and patterns for primary production, transportation, manufacturing and energy, service functions, trade and economic development.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 2650 - Introduction to Geospatial Technologies


    Introduction to technologies used for visualization, measurement, and analysis of features that occur on earth. Students are introduced to fundamentals of cartography, global positioning system (GPS), geographic information science (GIS), and remote sensing of the environment (RS). Topics will include nature and characteristics of geospatial technologies, concepts and characteristics of spatial data, principles and methods of capturing and representing spatial data, and methods of analysis and interpretation of spatial data. Students will have hands-on experience in working with the full range of geospatial technologies and products including maps, air photos, satellite images, GPS, as well as current GIS software.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area VII: Natural Science and Technology: Applications and Implications.
  
  • GEOG 3010 - Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems


    An introductory course that covers the use and application of geographic information systems (GIS). It combines an overview of general principles of GIS and practical experience in map creation and the use of spatial information, including fundamental aspects of measurement, representation and analysis. Intro GIS focuses on the basics of working with both vector and raster data, as well as the societal aspects of GIS (emerging uses, interaction with new technologies, data standards, public access to information).

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Students cannot receive credit for both GEOG 3010 and GEOG 5010.
    When Offered: Fall
  
  • GEOG 3030 - Geographic Inquiry


    Students will be introduced to geography as a field of study, research and professional opportunity. Students will have an opportunity to investigate social and environmental problems through data collection, analysis, interpretation, and graphic and written presentation. The emphasis throughout will be on the application of inquiry models to geographic problems. For Geography majors and minors and Tourism and Travel majors. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: STAT 1600 or STAT 2160 or STAT 2660 or STAT 3640 or STAT 3660.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • GEOG 3060 - Climate Change: Atmospheric Perspectives


    (Science credit) The study of the atmospheric environment as it interacts with humans and society. Special emphasis is given to the following: the role of weather and climate in affecting the successful outcome of plans and economic decisions; the dynamics of changing climates and their role in affecting the course of history; human physiological and psychological responses to weather and climate; weather forecasting and its value to society; and the hazards to life, health, and property posed by severe weather. Students should expect to achieve a sufficient understanding of the atmospheric environment so that they may make informed decisions involving weather topics.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area VII: Natural Science and Technology: Applications and Implications.
  
  • GEOG 3090 - Studies in Regional Geography


    An investigation of topics in physical and human geography of selected areas within major world regions. Regional concentration will vary from semester to semester, with the region being indicated at time of enrollment.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: consent of department advisor and instructor.

    Credits: 2 to 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 3100 - Introduction to Tourism


    Overview of the tourism industry and the factors which influence its structure and development. Examination of tourism as a human experience, a social-cultural phenomenon, an industry and a policy and research field.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 3110 - Geography of Michigan


    An introduction to the physical and cultural patterns in Michigan with emphasis upon an understanding of the distribution of population, resources, and forms of economic activity. Attention is also focused upon relevant current State problems.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 3200 - Culinary Tourism


    Culinary tourism is defined as the pursuit of unique and memorable culinary experiences of all kinds, often while traveling. These experiences, which include famous restaurants, bed and breakfast inns, local eateries, wineries, cooking schools, and food festivals, provide business opportunities to tourism industry, and learning opportunities to individuals about places and cultures from a culinary perspective. This course explores the geography of the culinary world with particular reference to the origins and diffusion of the world’s major staples and their relationships with regional cuisines and tourists sites. Topics include the relationship between tourism and food and wine, political, social, and economic contexts of food production and food flow, case studies of regional cuisines in the United States and from around the world, and their implications for the tourism and travel industry.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
  
  • GEOG 3500 - Conservation and Environmental Management


    (Science credit) A critical evaluation of the management of selected natural resources with primary focus on the United States. Conflicts between environmental and economic interests are examined in both historical and contemporary contexts.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 3610 - Population: The Crowding World


    Population distribution and settlement patterns are examined geographically. Population topics include mapping and analysis, theories of population change, and types of migration. Emphasis is also placed on functions and structure of urban and rural settlements in selected world regions.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 3800 - United States and Canada


    A study of the physical environment north of the Rio Grande followed by an analysis of the spatial structure of the area’s population and economy. The basis for the regional differentiation of the USA and Canada is considered, followed by a region-by-region analysis of each of these unique integrations of physical and cultural phenomena.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 3810 - South America


    Regional study of the nations of South America with attention to the interrelationships of the physical and cultural environments. Historical background necessary for the interpretation of the present political, social, and economic conditions is included.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 3820 - Mexico and the Caribbean


    Systematic review of the physical and cultural environments of Mexico, Central America and the West Indies. Economic, social and political issues will be examined from a spatial viewpoint.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 3830 - Geography of Europe


    Intensive regional study of the European nations. The physical elements (climate, landforms, resources, etc.) are examined and the derivative cultural elements are identified. Emphasis is placed upon the social and economic activities of contemporary Europe.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 3840 - The Post-Soviet States


    A geographical appraisal of the newly independent republics. Topics covered include: location and geographical setting, the physical environment, population, ethnic and nationality issues, economic development, and problems of environmental deterioration.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 3850 - The Pacific Realm


    Selected studies of the relationships between human beings and the environment in Australia, New Zealand, Melanesia, and Polynesia.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 3860 - Geography of Africa


    Survey of the principle physical, cultural, economic and political patterns of Africa, followed by studies of the significant elements of the major realms and states, e.g., population distribution, agriculture, patterns of economic and natural resource development, environmental issues, transportation systems, etc.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
  
  • GEOG 3870 - The Middle East and North Africa


    Study of the diversity and uniformity - both physical and cultural to -of the Middle East and Africa north of (and including) the Sahara. Special attention is given to aridity problems, economic development, petroleum, Arab reunification movements, and the impact of the Muslim World on the current political scene.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 3890 - Monsoon Asia


    Systematic survey of the physical and human (socio-economic) environments of the southeastern rim of Asia (Pakistan in the west to Japan in the east). Geographical background necessary to interpret present conditions is included.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
  
  • GEOG 3900 - China, Japan, and Korea: Lands and Cultures


    An introduction to the contemporary landscapes, cultures, and economies of the countries of East Asia, specifically China, Japan, and Korea. A basic survey of the interactions over time between the physical environments of East Asia and the cultures, the political conditions, the economies, and societies of these three main nations.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 4080 - Tourism Marketing


    Examination of the linkages between geography and tourism, the marketing of travel, and tourism and hospitality products. The course covers tourism and marketing research methods, marketing strategies, marketing planning, and marketing plan implementation with a focus on issues of tourism development. Students apply concepts and materials to a course research project related to tourism providers in west Michigan.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: GEOG 3100

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 4120 - Professional Practice


    Provision for an advanced student to benefit by supplementary practical experiences in a particular branch of geography, either by assisting faculty engaged in research or by working in a departmentally-approved off-campus agency. Specific assignments are arranged in consultation with departmental advisors during the semester preceding that in which the student expects to enroll in 4120. The student may enroll for one additional semester, but no student will be allowed more than six hours total credit for 4120. For Geography majors and minors, and Tourism and Travel majors only.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Junior standing and consent of Department Chair.

    Credits: 2 to 6 hours

  
  • GEOG 4180 - Tourism Planning and Development


    Introduction to concepts, principles, models, and theories of tourism planning and development. Analysis of issues in tourism planning including potential of the tourist sector, tourism image and impacts, positioning of tourism products, destination planning, and tourism development process and strategies at national, regional, and local levels.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  GEOG 3100

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 4240 - Biogeography


    This course focuses on the application of geographic theory, methods and techniques to the spatial distributions of plant and animal species. The course will explore both the physical and human dimensions of patterns and processes associated with species distributions, movement and conservation. Course themes will include such topics as: physical environment impacts on growth, development and distribution; global regions and ecoregions; agricultural production and domesticated species; movement of species (domestic, invasive); and epidemiology.

     

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites:  GEOG 1000 or GEOG 1050.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 4440 - Professional Development


    This is a capstone course focusing on professional career expectations, skills, standards and ethics, portfolio development, website creation and management, and issues in career development.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: GEOG 3030. To be taken Senior year. For majors in the Geography Department only.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • GEOG 4600 - Geography/Social Studies Teaching in Middle and High School


    This is a pre-service course designed to enable students to meet professional expectations and requirement necessary for teaching geography/social studies in middle and high schools. The teaching methodologies that enhance social science inquiry are the focus. Content standards for the Michigan Social Studies Framework are applied. Meets secondary methods requirements in geography and political science. An alternate methods course to secondary history. Fulfills the requirement for the social studies group minor.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: GEOG 4600 must be taken concurrently or following enrollment in ED 3010 and 3020.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 5010 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems


    Introduction to basic principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with applications to a variety of problems using established data sources and repositories. Includes fundamental principles of cartographic design and communication. A first course in a curricular sequence developing GIS professional expertise.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Completion of departmental computer literacy proficiency.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5210 - Studies in Climatology and Meteorology


    (Science credit) Studies at an advanced level in meteorology and climatology. Topics of current interest to atmospheric scientists are examined in depth. Regional climatic phenomena and their relation to atmospheric circulation patterns are also investigated.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: GEOG 2250 or department approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5430 - Transportation Planning


    This course covers the practice of planning multimodal transportation systems including motorized transportation networks (roads, cars, and trucking), public transportation (buses and rail), paratransit, non-motorized transportation (trails, bikes and pedestrian), airlines and airports, freight (road, rail, water, and air), and information networks. Information processing applications covered in this course include GIS-T and Intelligent Transportation Systems.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5440 - Studies in Economic Geography


    Studies in world  and local patterns of agriculture, manufacture, transportation, or retail/service activities. In any term, the course focuses upon one of these four economic sectors.

    1. Agriculture. Describes and analyzes agricultural systems throughout the world; focuses on selected crop-livestock systems and the changing character of agricultural land use in the United States. 
    2. Manufacture. Examination of theories and strategies of industrial plant location, the relationship of industrialization to regional economic growth and development, and selected industry case studies evaluating the interrelations of locational, economic, technological, and political factors in the respective industry’s historic evolution.
    3. Transportation. Examination of the historic evolution of transport systems in developed and developing nations, transport factors in location theory, techniques of transport analysis, the urban transport dilemma, and competitive and complementary characteristics of the different transport modes.
    4. Retail and Service. Examination of the evolution of the retail and service sector, the geography of retail and service firms, theories and strategies of retail and service firm location, and the relationship between retail and service sector and local economic development.


    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: GEOG 2050 or GEOG 2440 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Open to Upperclass and Graduate students. Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5450 - Studies in Human Geography


    Each course listed under this general title is a concentrated study of one of the principal subdivisions of human geography. The scope and principal themes of each specialized field are reviewed, with consideration given to current research on selected problems.

    1.  Cultural Geography.  Techniques of spatial analysis applicable to the study of humans and their environment. The place of origin, diffusion, and present distribution of selected cultural patterns will be traced with emphasis given to cultural traits which strongly influence human occupancy of the earth’s surface.

    2.  Historical Geography.  Studies of geographic and related features which have combined to influence the course of historical development. This course will concentrate on a particular region and/or period of time during each semester in which it is offered. Each specialization will be designated in the class schedule.

    3.  Political Geography.  General survey of the principles and the applied aspects of political geography; primary emphasis on the physical and cultural resource bases and conflicts of national states, the assessment of location, boundary delimitation and the territorial sea, politically-organized territories within the administrative hierarchy, and electoral geography.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: GEOG 3030, or GEOG 2050 or GEOG 2440, or instructor approval. Course may be repeated for credit.

    Credits: 2 to 3 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography or advisor and/or instructor approval.

  
  • GEOG 5530 - Water Resources Management


    Examination of water resources management with an emphasis on the effects of water uses and runoff on water quality and quantity. Topics include: water resource systems, estimating consumptive and non-consumptive water uses, and run off with computer models, and multiple socio-economic and hydrological factors in water resources management.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Junior, senior, or graduate student standing.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5540 - Outdoor Recreation: Resources and Planning


    (Science Credit) Examination of extensive, resource-based outdoor recreation (such as parks, wilderness, wild rivers, hunting and fishing, hiking, etc.) with emphasis upon recreational planning. Topics include supply and demand for outdoor recreation, identification of present and future recreational needs, policy considerations, administration of recreational land uses, and various problems associated with outdoor recreation. Readings, discussion, and student-designed and executed individual studies provide professional orientation.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5550 - Contemporary Issues in Resources Management


    (Science credit) Examination of selected contemporary natural resource and environmental problems, such as questions of natural resource adequacy, environmental pollution, energy shortages, political and economic problems related to resource management, and individual studies of local environmental problems.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: GEOG 3500 or department approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5560 - Studies in Urban and Regional Planning


    Each of the courses listed under this number focuses on a major aspect of planning, including a review of the objectives of the planning process, legislation pertaining to planning operations, and methods of field and library investigation required for analysis and policy formulation in matters related to planning.

    1. Urban Planning and Zoning. A survey of American planning thought and practice: the background of planning and zoning in American municipalities; traditional and contemporary approaches to the comprehensive plan; elements of land use and transportation planning; the legal foundations of zoning; and the organization of the planning agency.

    2. Regional Planning. Organization and plans of regional development programs.

    3. Public Lands and Parks. Specific programs and policies relating to the preservation and/or development of government-controlled lands.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: GEOG 3560, Graduate standing, or department approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.

  
  • GEOG 5570 - Environmental Impact Assessment


    Alteration of the natural and human environment for perceived economic and social benefits often has significant adverse consequences. Recognition of this problem is reflected in federal, state, and local laws and regulations requiring environmental impact statements. The course provides an introduction to the analysis and preparation of environmental impact assessments.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5630 - Surveying Techniques


    The theory and application of geographic techniques and instruments of field investigations: collection and analysis of field data, preparation and presentation of materials. The course is based primarily upon field operations. The purpose is to introduce students to the capabilities and limitations of traditional surveying techniques and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Students will gain a basic understanding of how satellite-based navigation systems operate and they will put into practice through a series of field exercises.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: GEOG 5010

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5660 - Field Geography


    The theory and application of geographic techniques and instruments of field investigations: collection and analysis of field data, preparation and presentation of materials. The course is based primarily upon field observations.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: GEOG 2650

    Credits: 2 to 4 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5670 - Spatial Analysis


    This course provides an introduction to techniques for spatial data analysis in geographical research. Topics include: experimental design and sampling; spatial data visualization and exploration; analysis of clusters and point patterns; global and local indicators of spatial autocorrelation; basic concepts of geostatistics; and an introduction to spatial data analysis. The main focus will be on data description and exploration.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: GEOG 5010 and STAT 3660 or prior coursework in descriptive and inferential statistics.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5690 - Intermediate Geographic Systems


    Principles and applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Examines the nature and accuracy of spatially referenced data, as well as methods of data capture, storage, retrieval, visualization, and output. Emphasis is placed on developing solutions to problems involving spatial entities and attributes by employing logical conceptual analysis using the tools provided by a typical geographic information system.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: GEOG 5010

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5700 - Cities and Urban Systems


    Study of processes and forms of urban settlement highlighting problems relating to (1) political and geographical realities of urbanized regions, (2) factors in city growth (or decline), (3) the sizes, functions, and geographical distribution of cities, and (4) population patterns in contemporary cities. Activities are designed to provide the student with experience in the use of source materials and methods of analysis utilized in urban geography.

    Credits: 3 to 4 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5710 - Introduction to Community Development and Planning


    An introductory survey of community planning and development practices in America. Topics include concepts of community planning and development, evolution and development of planning thought and practice in America, the background of planning and zoning in American municipalities, traditional and contemporary approaches to planning, planning theory, elements of planning law and administration, and ethical issues in planning.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites:  GEOG 3560 or Graduate standing or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • GEOG 5820 - Remote Sensing of the Environment


    An introduction to the concepts and foundations of air photo and satellite image interpretation, photogrammetry, and digital image processing. Students are also exposed to the physical principles that underlie electromagnetic radiation and its interactions with the earth-atmosphere system. Students who successfully complete this course should be able to understand the capabilities and limitations of photographic and digital imagery obtained from aircraft and space-borne platforms.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOG 5970 - Independent Study


    Designed for highly qualified majors and graduate students who wish to study in depth some aspect of their field of specialization under a member of the departmental staff. Repeatable for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: department advisor and instructor approval.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

    Notes: Prerequisites applicable to all 5000-level courses in Geography include 14 credit hours of geography, or advisor and/or instructor approval.
  
  • GEOS 1000 - Earth Studies


    Students will be introduced to the dynamic workings of the earth, with some discussion also of other planets. The information will be designed to provide useful knowledge to guide the student’s future choices of living conditions. Topics include plate tectonic evolution, earth materials, volcanic activity, landslides, rivers and flooding, groundwater activity, glaciers and deserts, coastal processes, energy resources, climate change and earthquake locations and effects.

    This course is especially designed for non-science majors who seek a basic course in physical geology. Students planning to major in geosciences or in another science or engineering are encouraged to enroll in GEOS 1300. Three lectures and a two-hour laboratory period per week.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Fulfills General Education Area VI: Natural Science with Laboratory.
    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 - 2)
    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I

  
  • GEOS 1290 - Physical Geology Laboratory


    A laboratory experience covering minerals and rocks, and the interpretation of topographic and Geologic maps.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Minimum 3 hours of nonlaboratory Geology.

    Credits: 1 hour

  
  • GEOS 1300 - Physical Geology


    This course introduces students to the principal geologic processes that shape the earth and methods by which these processes are studied with emphasis on the paradigm of plate tectonics. The interior of the earth is examined from the perspective of how we determine, without direct observation, the layering and composition within. Principles and techniques of physics and chemistry are applied to the study of the origin of minerals and rocks, and geologic structures. Geomorphic processes and natural disasters like earthquakes are examined with special consideration of their importance to engineering design and practice.

    This course is especially designed for students interested in science and engineering and for those who expect to major in geosciences or geosciences education. Students who are interested in a beginning course in geology, but who do not plan to pursue a major in science or engineering are encouraged to enroll in GEOS 1000. Three lectures and a two-hour laboratory period per week.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Fulfills General Education Area VI: Natural Science with Laboratory.
    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 - 2)
    When Offered: Fall, Spring

  
  • GEOS 1310 - Historical Geology


    Geologic time, evolution of prehistoric life, and principles of earth history with case examples from North America.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: GEOS 1300 or GEOS 1000.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Spring
  
  • GEOS 1440 - Environmental Earth Science


    A study of the earth from an environmental perspective. Origin of the earth and solar system, physical and chemical structure of the earth, chronology, and the use of the scientific method to advance this understanding. Focus on the hydrosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere and their interactions. Fulfills General Education Area VII.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Spring
  
  • GEOS 1500 - Earth Hazards and Disasters


    An introduction to the major geologic hazards affecting the earth. Impacts, earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunami and coastal hazards, mass wasting, and flooding will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on understanding how and why these hazards occur, how these hazards affect the lives of citizens in the United States and around the world, and how geoscience and technology can be used to identify and manage potential hazards.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
  • GEOS 2000 - Evolution of Life - A Geological Perspective


    The geologic attributes of our planet have shaped the course of biological evolution across four billion years of Earth’s history. This course surveys the major events and mechanisms of that history, focusing on the origins of our planet and its life, self-organization and complexity, bacteria in extreme environments, the rise of animals and plants, the colonization of land, mass extinctions, planetary change over time and the possibility of life elsewhere in the cosmos. Three lectures and a two-hour laboratory period per week.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Fulfills General Education Area VI: Natural Science with Laboratory.
    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 - 2)
    When Offered: Fall
  
  • GEOS 2020 - Egypt - Civilization and Geology


    Explores how the regional geological and hydrological environments of Egypt have influenced both ancient and modern Egyptian civilizations. Throughout history, these varying conditions created both benefits and constraints, causing existing civilizations to either flourish, or wither and fall. The availability of stone and other building materials, each with their unique engineering properties, dictated the types of cities, temples and even style of pyramids that could be constructed. The River Nile, along with its unique hydrological regime, played a critical role in all aspects of life within this region. This course which can be taken by both geology majors and non-majors, will focus on how the geological setting of this region played a significant role in shaping the culture and history of Egypt, as it influenced the various people who lived there, from earliest times to the modern era.

    The class will meet on campus during the Spring semester for 1 lecture (1 hr. 15 min.) and 1 discussion/lab section (50 min.) per week. There is also a required 2 week field trip to Egypt. The field trip portion of the course will be conducted through the Haenicke Institute for Global Studies as a “Study Abroad” program during the two week period immediately following the spring semester (first two weeks of May). Students are required to take both the classroom and field trip portions of the course. Neither portion of the course is offered as a “stand-alone” unit. Students will earn 3 credit hours (applicable to General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations) for the completed course (classroom and field trip together).

    Registration approval for the course is required from the Geosciences Department. Completed course approval can be obtained at the Geosciences Departmental Office (1183 Rood Hall). Details about the field trip, and the additional expenses required for this portion of the course, will be explained at this time. There is a non-refundable trip down-payment required at the beginning of the spring semester coursework for final registration acceptance.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies Gereal Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.

  
  • GEOS 2200 - Climate Change: Geological Perspectives


    An introduction to the Earth’s climate over the expanse of geologic time. We will learn how and why Earth’s climate changed. We will study the current climate system using the perspective gained from earth history to assess present and future climate changes. We will learn how these changes will likely affect the lives of citizens in the United States and around the world, and how geosciences and technology can be used to predict and manage climate change’s adverse consequences.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: This course satisfies General Education Area VII: Natural Science and Technology:Applications and Implications.
    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 1)
 

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