Mar 05, 2024  
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • HPER 4140 - Measurement and Evaluation in Health Education


    This course provides a forum for developing measurement and evaluation skills relevant to the completion of HPER 4120 (HESJ requirement) and HPER 431 (CHDJ requirement) in health education. The core competencies for professional development of a health educator related to needs assessment and evaluation will also be covered. The settings for health education practice covered in this course would include the school and the community.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: HPER 3500 and HPER 3310 (CHDJ) OR HPER 3120 (HESJ); Corequisites: HPER 4310 or HPER 4120.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HPER 4160 - Topics in Recreation


    The purpose of this course is to pick one or two topics or issues each time it is offered for in-depth investigation and study. The course will provide students with a background in current issues and current developments in the field of recreation.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • HPER 4161 - Commercial Recreation


    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • HPER 4164 - Legal Issues in Recreation


    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • HPER 4300 - Community Health Education Interventions: Community Strategies


    Designed to prepare students with skills necessary to implement health education programs within the context of community health settings. Emphasis is placed on community health education methods at the community level, including community organization, coalition building, community empowerment, and legislative advocacy.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: HPER 3310.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HPER 4310 - Community Health Education Interventions: Individual Strategies


    Designed to prepare students with skills necessary to implement health education programs within the context of community health settings. Emphasis is placed on community health education methods at the individual level, including development of educational materials, working with media, group processes, and effective presentations.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: HPER 3310.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HPER 4440 - Professional Development in Exercise Science


    This course is designed to provide exercise science majors with information and experiences that will enable them to plan, design, promote, and implement adult exercise programs. Special emphasis is placed on the following: developing qualities of successful leadership, public speaking, planning procedures, programming procedures, use of technology, program promotion, facilities and equipment, teaching techniques for adult learners, and career planning and development.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: HPER 2950, 2960, 2980, 3170, 3950, 3960, 3970.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HPER 4450 - Exercise Testing and Prescription


    This course prepares students to plan and implement exercise programs for adults who have a variety of needs. Students are taught how to screen clients, determine risks, establish a safe exercise environment, assess health related fitness, interpret test data and establish an exercise plan.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: HPER 2950, 2960, 2980, 3170, 3950, and 3970.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HPER 4470 - Physical Education Methods: Instructional Design


    This course is designed to provide experiences which will enable the student to: (1) identify instructional constraints; (2) select motor appropriate experiences for children K-12; (3) develop effective instructional materials; and (4) develop management and administrative skills required to plan and implement a contemporary physical education program in school settings.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: HPER 1500, 2400, 2950, 2980, 3150, 3450, 3460, 3900, and 3920.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HPER 4480 - Physical Education Methods: Teaching Skills


    This course provides information and experiences which allow the student to plan and implement effective physical education curricula based on a developmental mode and to self-assess teaching performance using reflective systematic skills.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: HPER 4470.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HPER 4500 - Cultural Dynamics in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation


    This course is for majors in the physical education teacher/coach, health, recreation, and exercise science emphases. A comparative approach is taken that applies sociology and multiculturalism to the fields of health, physical activity, and recreation using the vehicle of contemporary sport issues and trends. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: HPER 1500(PDEJ) or 1530 (ATDJ) or 1550 (CHDJ), 56 hrs. (junior status).

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HPER 4690 - Fitness Management


    The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the scope, characteristics, management techniques, and business operations used in the field of sport management, as well as exercise science professions.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: HPER 2980, 3950, and 3960.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • HPER 4720 - Recreation for the Aging


    An overview of aging especially as it relates to leisure pursuits and organized recreation. Includes observation, participation and leadership of recreational activities or programs for retirees, nursing homes, senior citizens housing units and clubs.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: 56 hrs. (junior status).

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
  • HPER 4750 - Intern Teaching in HPER


    This course represents the final experience of the student’s curriculum during which an application of all knowledge and skills acquired is facilitated. Through the experiences provided in this course, students develop the skills and knowledge necessary for certification as a health or physical education teacher in the state of Michigan. Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Department approval.

    Credits: 5 or 10 hours

  
  • HPER 4760 - Advanced Applications of Recreational Management


    The purpose of this course is to provide students with advanced skills that are required in the administration of modern recreation and leisure service agencies. This course will allow students not only to gain knowledge of advanced administration skills, but to apply them in practical situations. This course will also present a final overview for recreation students and will cover in-depth issues such as ethics, communications, time management, legal issues, and professional development.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: HPER 3760.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HPER 4800 - Basic Electrocardiography


    The purpose of this course is to examine the anatomy, physiology and electrophysiology of the heart; identify and describe a normal EKG, identify and describe abnormal EKG’s; identify arrhythmias and abnormalities of the heart from an EKG; become familiar with common cardiac medications; observe a maximal graded exercise test.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: HPER 2980, 3170.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • HPER 4860 - Therapeutic Exercise for Athletic Injuries


    This course will study the theory of rehabilitation and to learn the correct application of therapeutic exercise techniques in the management of athletic injuries. To plan, implement, document, and evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic exercise program for the rehabilitation and reconditioning of athletic related injuries.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: HPER 3830 and 3840.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HPER 4870 - Sports Medicine Seminar


    A course designed to address relevant and contemporary issues in sports medicine. Particular emphasis is given to the topic of health care administration and professional development of the certified athletic trainer.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Admission into Athletic Training Professional Program.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HPER 4910 - Exercise for Special Populations


    This course serves as an introduction to exercise management for individuals who experience chronic disease and disabilities. Students will develop and apply knowledge of testing procedures and program development for special populations, including the pathophysiology of various diagnoses and specific effects of exercise response, training, and contraindicated exercises.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: HPER 2950, 2960, 2980, 3170, 3950, 3960, and 3970.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Winter
  
  • HPER 4960 - Community Health Education Internship


    Designed to prepare students with skills necessary to implement health education programs within the context of community health setting. Emphasis is placed on community health education methods at the community level, including community organization, coalition building, community empowerment, and legislative advocacy.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: All other required CHDJ major courses; departmental approval.

    Credits: 4 to 6 hours

  
  • HPER 4970 - Senior Seminar in Recreational Services


    The course is designed to present to the undergraduate student a final overview of the field of recreation and to prepare the student for his/her internship. It is also designed to cover topics including professional associations, current issues, ethics, jobs searching, and job skills.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: HPER 3760; 88 hrs. (senior status).

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • HPER 4980 - Exercise Science Internship


    This course will provide an in depth internship in an applied setting supporting the outcomes of the Exercise Science undergraduate major. All course work must be completed prior to the internship. All internship sites must be approved by the HPER Department. Student must apply one semester in advance of the internship placement. Course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Exercise Science major; all Exercise Science major courses completed.

    Credits: 6 hours

  
  • HPER 4990 - Recreation Internship


    The recreation internship is structured to bring academic course work to life, provide valuable work experience, and professional contacts. This will help ensure a successful professional career. The recreation major must commit to a 15-week full item experience with an agency/organization in recreation or leisure service delivery or an appropriately related field. Students are given letter grades in course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Department approval.

    Credits: 6 hours

  
  • HPER 5000 - Studies in Health, Physical Education and Recreation


    In-depth study of selected topics in HPER. Format can include clinics, workshops, seminars, travel and/or mini-courses; and provide opportunity to acquire skills and teaching techniques. State, national, and international authorities or consultants may be involved. Topics include: Lifetime Sports, Outdoor Education, Physical Education, Stress Management, Physical Fitness, Business Procedures, Nutrition. Professional Courses Open To Upperclass and Graduate Students (HPER).

    Credits: 1 to 2 hours

  
  • HPER 5100 - Modern Health for Teachers and Health Professionals


    This course is designed for teachers and health professionals who have need of current knowledge in health science. The course surveys topics such as mental health, nutrition, substance abuse, physical fitness, chronic diseases, and stress management. Consideration is given to psychological, sociological and cultural factors that influence health improvement. Attention is given to special factors of health and illness of children and adolescents. This course is not open to health education majors and minors who have had HPER 1000, 2200, 2210. Professional Courses Open To Upperclass and Graduate Students (HPER).

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HPER 5120 - Principles, Practices, and Methods in Health Education


    This course surveys the history, philosophy, and methods of health education. The philosophical basis and practices of health education are discussed in terms of needs and capabilities of people and factors that influence their development. Emphasis is placed upon the promotion of health and prevention of disease, disability, and premature death. Curriculum development and teaching methods focus on content and strategies considered most effective in teaching disease prevention and health promotion. The course is not open to health education majors or minors who have had 3120 or 4120.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: 5100 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Professional Courses Open To Upperclass and Graduate Students (HPER).
  
  • HPER 5140 - Methods and Materials in Health Education


    Lectures and demonstrations with emphasis on the effective health supervision of school children, the principles and practices of health teaching in the various grades, and the interrelation of this teaching with that of other subjects in this curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: HPER 3120, 4120 or 5120 or consent of department.

    Credits: 2 hours

    Notes: Professional Courses Open To Upperclass and Graduate Students (HPER).
  
  • HPER 5160 - Issues in Health Education


    The focus will be placed on current health issues. May be designed to deal with one issue or several topics.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Professional Courses Open To Upperclass and Graduate Students (HPER).

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
  • HPER 5300 - Practicum in Teaching and Coaching


    Demonstrations, participation and evaluation on teaching and coaching fundamentals in selected sports. A graduate student may apply a maximum of four credits from 530 courses toward the Master’s Degree Program. Sports include: Archery, Badminton, Baseball, Basketball, Football, Golf, Field Hockey, Gymnastics, Ice Hockey, Judo, Karate, Soccer, Swimming, Track and Field, Volleyball, Wrestling, Yoga.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Professional Courses Open To Upperclass and Graduate Students (HPER).

    Credits: 1 to 2 hours

  
  • HPER 5800 - Studies in Athletic Training


    Listed with various topics. A lecture/demonstration course concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of sports type injuries.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BIOS 2110, 2400, HPER 3800.

    Credits: 1 to 2 hours

    Notes: Professional Courses Open To Upperclass and Graduate Students (HPER).
    When Offered: Fall (Undergrad Athletic Trainer), Winter (Graduate Non-Athletic Trainer)
  
  • HPER 5980 - Readings in Health, Physical Education and Recreation


    Advanced students with good academic records may elect to pursue independently a program of readings in areas of special interest.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Approval of the Chairperson of the Department of Physical Education.

    Credits: 1 to 2 hours

    Notes: Courses Open To Graduate Students Only.
    When Offered: All Semesters
  
  • HSV 1000 - Health and Human Services Career Seminar


    Explores careers in the health and human services professions This course is designed to assist students in making informed choices regarding career opportunities and in selecting the necessary programs of study for non-clinical careers and for preparation for candidacy in health and human service professional degree and certificate programs.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • HSV 1100 - Introduction to Health and Human Services


    This course provides an overview of the issues, philosophies, political ideologies, economic theories, and American values which have an impact on health and human service delivery. In addition, students will be introduced to the historical development, areas of services, and models of service delivery which are part of health and human services. The course will also provide students with the opportunity of learning about potential careers in the various professions within the field.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HSV 3350 - Pharmacology for Health Professionals


    This course focuses on basic principles in pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics. Principles necessary for a general understanding of the medical management of acute and chronic disease states will be highlighted. Discussion will center on classes of drugs with pharmacology, side effects, and contraindications identified. Case studies may be utilized to emphasize commonly encountered patient care scenarios.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HSV 4100 - Legal Issues in Health and Human Services


    An overview of the law and its administration as it applies to the policies and procedures that are designed o improve and protect the health and social well-being of the population. The course will provide a survey of the basic concepts and content in the major areas of health and human service law, an explanation and identification of sources of legal authority and responsibility, and a familiarity with legal language.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • HSV 4120 - Principles of Health Finance


    This course is an examination of the principles of finance as applied to health care management. The course will provide a basis for understanding the financial management function in a health care administration environment and on the use of financial information in health care management and decision-making.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HSV 4140 - Basic Principles and Organization of Health Planning


    This course is an introduction to the principles and methods of planning in the health system. It includes a descriptive analysis of the significance of planning effective health care services, alternative planning frameworks, and technical approaches to the planning process. In addition, the course surveys the history of planning in the health systems as well as the current structure arrangements for carrying out planning in the health arena both at the macro and micro levels.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HSV 4150 - Administrative Functions in the Health Care Setting


    This course focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary for the major administrative functions in health organizations. These include goal setting, decision-making, personnel management, data processing, service design, and general principles of financial management.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HSV 4200 - Health and Human Services Research and Statistics


    An introduction to the fundamentals of research design and statistics used in health and human service research and the application of this research to the improvement of care and service delivery. This course provides students with the basic skills to critically evaluate and analyze scientific research and conduct computer literature searches and reviews.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HSV 4350 - Special Topics in Health and Human Services


    This is a variable topics, variable credit undergraduate level course for consideration of current and special interests in health and human services. Specific topics and number of credit hours will be announced each time the course is scheduled. May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

  
  • HSV 4500 - Individual Studies in Health and Human Services


    This course will be arranged on an individual basis to provide students the opportunity to pursue independently the study of special areas of interest. May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

  
  • HSV 4690 - AIDS/HIV: Perspective on an Epidemic


    This course is intended to provide a historical perspective and introduction to the social, psychological, biological, political, economic, ethical, and medical implications of HIV infection and the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The course will be team taught by faculty and others in a variety of fields.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HSV 4810 - The Health System and Its Environment


    This course provides a descriptive analysis of the organization of the health system. The student who participates can expect to gain an understanding of the structure of health services as well as the processes of operation of the service system and the ways in which consumers make use of the system. The analysis focuses on the interplay of forces within the system as well as behind the system and its environment.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to Interdisciplinary Health Services and Interdisciplinary Health Services:OT majors only.

  
  • HSV 4850 - Major Issues in Health and Human Services


    Examines the major issues which influence health and human services and their delivery, including special population service provision, advocacy, patient/client-centered care, psycho-social aspects of disease and wellness, health promotion and education, quality and cost controls, and interdisciplinary team approaches to service delivery. The importance of services responsive to the needs of a diverse and multicultural population is also stressed. Students will receive instruction OSHA, Universal Precautions, CPR, and first aid.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Restrictions: This course is restricted to Interdisciplinary Health Services majors.

  
  • HSV 4890 - Health and Human Services Independent Research


    This course requires the completion of a credible research project related to a current issue in health and human services. The project must be approved and supervised by faculty. This course is only open to students who are registered, certified, or licensed health care providers who wish to substitute a research project and an elective course (3 hrs.) for the required HSV 4900 Internship.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: HSV 4850.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • HSV 4900 - Health and Human Services Internship


    This course provides the student with a supervised internship experience of at least 240 agency clock hours in a health and human service organization or agency in which the student can apply the knowledge learned in the program and develop and refine his/her skills with the assistance and guidance of professionals working in the field.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: HSV 4850.

    Credits: 1 to 6 hours

    Notes: Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.
  
  • ID 1430 - Industrial Design Fundamentals Studio


    An introduction to the professional practice of Industrial Design. Topics include social and economic motives for designing; evolution of style in mass-produced products; orthographic, isometric, perspective, and model representation. Students will work on simple creative projects involving one to three part objects and will learn basic methodology principles with emphasis on research and problem identification.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (1 to 4)
  
  • ID 1470 - Principles of Industrial Form Studio


    Industrial form’s dependence on materials, tools and machine processes. Industrial and natural form generation. Experiments on static structures. Creative projects involving simple objects.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ID 1430 and ART 1040 and IME 1420 and MATH 1180.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (0 to 4)
  
  • ID 1540 - Portfolio Review I


    Students must complete this review prior to enrolling in Industrial Design design-oriented courses at the 2000-level and above. Students enroll in this course at the same time as ID 1470.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites (or taken concurrently): ID 1470 and MATH 2000 and IME 2460 and IME 1020.

    Credits: 0 hours

  
  • ID 2010 - History of Design


    Begins with an overview of the history of design, craft, and technology before the 20th century. Renaissance and Industrial Revolution periods are highlighted. Design history of the 20th century showing important social and technical developments which have influenced industrial priorities, markets, and practices. Important people, movements, schools, and philosophies that have influenced the evolution of industrial design around the world.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • ID 2030 - Color in Industrial Design


    Develop through experience an understanding of color, color action and color relationships. Interaction of color, form, materials, proportion, function and composition. Color and information, color and signage. Application of this knowledge to Industrial Design problem solutions.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ID 1540.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 to 2)
  
  • ID 2050 - Model Construction Studio I


    Development of fast, simple mock-ups and form studies using clay, paper, plastic foam, wire, plaster and other materials. Creation of realistic looking models which reflect a high degree of craftsmanship. Use of hand tools, power tools and machines. Use of plastic foam, plastics, wood and metal.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ID 2430.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (0 to 6)
  
  • ID 2220 - Wood Furniture Design


    Identification of selected wood species and man-made composites. Basic principles of wood product design are introduced. Aesthetic and ergonomic criteria will be emphasized. Selection of materials, basic processes and tools, introduction to machining and selection and application of finishing materials is taught. Preparation of Industrial Design documentation is required, i.e. 3D, orthographic and working drawings of the product and its parts.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ID 1540.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 to 3)
  
  • ID 2430 - Product Design Methodology Studio I


    Introduction to product design methodology for mass-produced products. Study the Industrial Design Process and its application from idea generation through all the development stages to the introduction of a product in the marketplace. Ergonomics and user interface to enhance idea implementation. In depth study of sketching and rendering skills. Quick concept projects, basic research principles, preliminary dimensional, orthographic drawings, renderings and 3/4 view product presentation.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ID 1540 and ART 1050 and ART 1070 and ART 1080.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (0 to 6)
  
  • ID 2470 - Product Design Methodology Studio II


    Introduction to quick product concept development projects focusing on research, ideation, shape, form, proportions, ergonomics, user interface, and manufacturing processes. Application of model shop skills and technology. Build a volumetric study model. A midterm project focusing on use and application of the Industrial Design Process, including visual, written, and verbal presentations. Final model is constructed to confirm the original design intent. Design and organization of portfolios for review to move to 3000-level courses.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ID 2430 and ID 2510 and IME 1500.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (0 to 6)
  
  • ID 2510 - Computer-Aided Design Studio I


    Introduction to the advanced professional computer-aided Industrial Design hardware and software. Students will start with a CAD wire-frame to create a photo realistic computer model and rendering. Application of these processes in computer-aided manufacturing and interactive software design. Introduction to a variety of software programs will be made.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ID 1540.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (0 to 6)
  
  • ID 2520 - Computer-Aided Design Studio II


    Continuation of study with the hardware and software used in Industrial Design. Animation and presentation software. Product development using only the computer.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ID 2510.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (0 to 6)
  
  • ID 2540 - Portfolio Review II


    Students must complete this review prior to enrolling in Industrial Design design oriented courses at the 3000 level and above. Students enroll in this course at the same time as ID 247.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites (or taken concurrently): ID 2470 and ID 2050 and ID 2520.

    Credits: 0 hour

  
  • ID 3050 - Model Construction Studio II


    Building working prototypes of simple devices and systems. Creation of advanced models with real finish. Use of advanced processes and machines.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ID 2540.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (0 to 6)
  
  • ID 3220 - Advanced Woodworking Design


    Creation of new wood products based on functional, ergonomic, aesthetic and strength needs. Environmental aspects of the processes applied in the design will be analyzed. Basic cutting theories, woodworking machine construction, and advanced manufacturing lines including the 32mm construction system and flat-line processing application will be taught. Industrial Design documentation will be required.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ID 2220 and IME 2460.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 to 3)
  
  • ID 3300 - Wood and Related Materials for the Interior Designer


    A study of the physical and mechanical properties of wood and wood-based materials, joint design, adhesives and fasteners, and selection and application of finishes. The effect of human factors on the design of furniture and interiors is emphasized.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 to 3)
  
  • ID 3320 - Wood Finishing


    Function of various finishing materials, surface preparation, principles of color, methods of application and final finishing. Environmental regulations pertaining to furniture finishing. Scheduling, repair, and refinish applications will be studied.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ID 2220 and CHEM 1100 and 1110.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 to 3)
  
  • ID 3430 - Advanced Product Design Studio


    Sketching exercises for the development of ideas, concepts, organization of ideas, and project planning to maintain optimum design output and consistency. Three accelerated projects concentrate on idea development and problem solving techniques. Advanced study of function, ergonomics, user interface and manufacturing processes. Study team leadership roles and project management in class or company sponsored assignment. A midterm project covers the entire Industrial Design Process and a well-constructed model. Final presentation in Power Point.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ID 2540 and CHEM 1100 and CHEM 1110.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (0 to 6)
  
  • ID 3470 - Product Design Practicum Studio


    Three accelerated projects focusing on advanced research, concept development sketches and renderings to evaluate and confirm design intent. Solve problem with using new materials, new technology, and human interface with the product. A midterm class project or company sponsored covers the entire Industrial Design Process. Leadership roles and project management. Final presentation in Power Point, and a high quality final model. Study process to evaluate materials needed for development of a professional portfolio in 400-level classes.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ID 3430 and ID 3050 and ID 3220. Corequisite: FS IME 3420.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (0 to 6)
  
  • ID 4320 - Production Woodworking


    Mass production techniques utilizing computer-aided design and manufacturing, material yield, production planning, sequence of operation, dimensional control, and interchangeability. Production methods as they affect quality of wood products.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ID 3220.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 to 3)
  
  • ID 4340 - Physics and Mechanics of Wood


    Physical and mechanical properties of wood and orthotropic wood structure will be studied and incorporated in the ASTM testing methods. Analysis of stress distribution, mode failure, and fracture characteristics will be studied. The relationship among orthotropic wood structure, joint design, and fastening methods on structural integrity will be analyzed. Computer systems will be used in statistical analysis and graphing of experimental data.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ID 2220 or department approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • ID 4430 - Industrial Design Thesis and Project Studio I


    A two-semester course that requires: 1) A major design project; 2) design of a professional portfolio; 3) design of a resume, cover letter and business cards, sample sheets and sample CD; 4) professional final presentation of major project in Power Point, Director or Flash; 5) preparation of all the project materials for the Senior Engineering and Design presentation. Major project requires following the entire Industrial Design Process: research, idea generation and development, sketches, sketch model, dimensional drawings, exploded view, bill of materials, final rendering and a pristine model. Application of ergonomics, user interface, engineering and manufacturing principles. This course, along with ID 447 creates the foundation to collect and create materials for a professional portfolio, and support materials. This course, along with ID 447, is approved as a writing-intensive course, which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ID 3470 and ID 2030 and IME 2500.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (0 to 6)
  
  • ID 4470 - Industrial Design Thesis and Project Studio II


    In the second part of this course, the student focuses problem-solving principles for function, user interface and manufacturing processes. Project moves to the Conversion Phase of the ID process. Complete dimensional drawings, design details to build a pristine final model. Final renderings, and 3D modeling studies. Simultaneously, the student must complete his/her portfolio and written material. Create and design his/her final presentation in Power Point, Director or Flash. The student prepares all the materials needed for the Senior Engineering and Design presentation. Lectures focusing on resume design, interview skills, verbal development and job-seeking techniques. This course, along with ID 4430, is approved to fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ID 4430

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (0 to 6)
  
  • ID 4970 - Topics in Industrial Design


    A specialized course dealing with some particular area of design not usually included in other course offerings.

    Credits: 1 to 6 hours

    Notes: May be repeated for credit with different topics to a maximum of six credit hours.
    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (Variable)
  
  • ID 4990 - Independent Studies


    An individual study program to supplement regular course work, arranged in consultation with a study supervisor. One to three hours credit per semester.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Consent of department.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

    Notes: May be repeated not to exceed six credit hours.
    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (Variable)
  
  • IMAG 1500 - Introduction to Imaging


    An introductory course describing the printing/imaging industry. Image Design, preparation, generation, photo imaging by photomechanical and desktop systems, proofing, presswork, and bindery. A comparison of all printing methods will be included. Learning environment enhance by hands-on experience.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 1570 - Imaging Systems


    Conversion of line and halftone image sources to digital data for output as reflection copy proofs, film or direct to plate. Photosensitive materials, electronic imaging systems, lenses and light, copy and data requirements, chemical and dry processing methods, densitometric and sensitometric instrumentation and image analysis.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: IMAG 1500 (may be taken concurrently).

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 2150 - Introduction to Ink


    Ink main components and ink additives. Formulation, manufacturing, quality control, and waste disposal of liquid and paste inks. Ink and color. Relationship between the chemical and physical properties of inks and their printing quality. Working properties of ink. Optical properties of ink. End-use properties of ink. Concepts of rheology and surface energy. Environmental concerns. Water-based, solvent based, UV and EB curable ink chemistries. Inks for impact printing processes. Digital inks.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: IMAG 1500, CHEM 1100 and PAPR 1000.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 2510 - Multimedia Publication and Design


    Design and composition of multimedia publications. This includes publications for print, web and CD-ROM, as well as animation and video. Different types of graphic objects and color representations will receive extensive coverage. Page layout, web authoring and digital video editing software will be utilized in extensive laboratory exercises.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 2570 - Computer Graphics


    Computer graphics from the point of view of both hardware and software. The representation, display, and manipulation of graphical objects. The relationships of displayed graphics to printed graphics, both direct digital and conventional.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: IMAG 1570, 2510.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 3100 - Work Experience/Coop


    Full-time employment in an imaging, or related industry that provides first-hand experience in a job capacity directly related to imaging industries. A written report is required. Departmental consent is required. Open only to department majors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Junior standing.

    Credits: 1 hour

  
  • IMAG 3500 - Offset Lithography


    Substrate selection for web and sheetfed offset printing, offset printability, and printing defects. Prepress operations, platemaking, proofing. Offset press components, register controls, printing units, principles of drying, impression rollers and blankets. Ink variables, and differences between inks for publication, packaging and product printing.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: IMAG 2150, STAT 2160 or STAT 2610.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 3570 - Color Management


    Introduction to color management, color science and color imaging technologies. The course covers the basics of color reproduction for printing. It deals with RGB, CMYK and CIE color models. A large focus of the course is practical color management as practiced in the industry today. An ICC workflow and ICC profiles will be constructed and analysed. Profiles for scanners, monitors and printers will be made.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: IMAG 1570, IMAG 2510.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 3580 - Flexography


    The study of all segments of the flexographic printing process, including current and future technology. Study of market segments and uses of flexography as a label and package printing process.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: IMAG 215, STAT 2160 or 2610.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 3590 - Rotogravure


    Substrate selection for rotogravure, gravure printability, and printing defects. Prepress operations, cylinder plating, engraving, proofing. Gravure press components, register controls, printing units, doctor blades, principles of drying and solvent regeneration, doctor blades, impression rollers and electrostatic assist. Ink variables, and differences between inks for publication, packaging and product printing.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: IMAG 2150, STAT 2160 or 2610.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 4150 - Inks and Imaging


    A course designed to provide science and engineering majors with a basic understanding of formulation, manufacture, and testing of different printing inks. Ink constituents and their properties, formulations for specific end use applications, special purpose inks, curing systems, and environmental issues will be some of the topics covered in the course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 3750 and CHEM 4300.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 4160 - Imaging Materials and Processes


    A course designed to provide science and engineering majors with a basic understanding of various printing processes detail; imaging materials and processes, pre-press processes and color and imaging science will be some of the topics covered in the course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CHEM 3750 and CHEM 4300.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 4400 - Seminar


    A seminar course using guest speakers, University staff and field trips to add depth and breadth to the students’ education.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Junior standing.

    Credits: 1 hour

  
  • IMAG 4570 - Advanced Multimedia


    Advanced methods in digital multimedia creation and manipulation. Digital video and computer animation will combined and edited using professional techniques. Multimedia video productions will be produced using CD/DVD recording devices and analog display and recording devices.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: IMAG 2570 (may be taken concurrently).

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 4580 - Digital Imaging and Workflow


    Digital imaging methods for prepress and direct printing. Digital printing mechanisms discussed in detail. Workflow standards including CIP4, JDG, PDF/X, etc.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Corequisite: IMAG 3570.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • IMAG 4620 - Imaging Estimating


    Estimating the price of imaged (printed, displayed, animated, etc.) materials before manufacture and in the final pricing. Computerized estimating systems and techniques.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: IMAG 3500 or IMAG 3580 or IMAG 3590 (may be taken concurrently).

    Credits: 4 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 4630 - Finishing/Bindery


    Analyze post-press equipment and operations to complete the printed piece. Field trips will demonstrate the scope of operations involved. Study of equipment costs and development of Basic Hourly Costs; postal rates, regulations, and procedures.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: IMAG 4620 (may be taken concurrently).

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • IMAG 4660 - Systems in Printing Management


    Study the organization and management of printing companies in regards to personnel selection and training, quality assurance standards and development, safety and environmental concerns, social responsibilities, morals and ethics, scheduling procedures and work flow and ISO certification.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: IMAG 4630

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • IMAG 4850 - Research Design


    Research selection, planning, design, and writing. A research problem selected in consultation with faculty. Student will define and analyze the problem; do a critical review of the literature; and propose a documented research program to increase understanding and knowledge about the problem. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which fulfils the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Senior standing in major.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • IMAG 5100 - Printability Analysis


    Relationships between printed substrate, ink, printing process and resulting print quality from both the theoretical and measurement standpoints. Print recognition and printing problems from the point of view of substrate formation and its physicochemical properties, ink characteristics, and the printing process parameters. Main techniques of printability evaluation will include modern optical methods of light interaction with both printed and unprinted substrate, spectrophotometry, and image analysis.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: IMAG 3500 or 3580 or 3590 or PAPR 3420.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • IME 1020 - Technical Communication


    Principles of objective presentation of factual material in written, oral, and electronic communication, with emphasis on the research process. Content, format, and mechanics, as well as a clear, concise style are important components of individual and collaborative assignments.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGL 1000 or placement into College-level writing.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • IME 1220 - Automobile in Society


    Applications of principles of Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Technology applied to the automobile. Topics included are: Occupant Protections, Vehicle Control, Physical Strength and Durability of Drivers, Power Production, Global Warming, Power Transmission, Energy Storage and Retrieval, Air Pollution, Use and Re-use of Natural Resources, Choices dealing with Vehicle Selection, Purchase Options, Insurance, Productivity, Maintenance, Societal Consequences and a history of the industry’s record of successes and failures.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • IME 1420 - Engineering Graphics


    Essentials of engineering graphics including technical sketching, CAD applications, applied geometry, orthographic projection, section, dimensioning, tolerancing, threads and fasteners, weldments, detail and assembly drawing, charting and basic elements of descriptive geometry. All work is according to current ANSI drafting standards. Previous technical drawing is recommended.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 to 3)
  
  • IME 1440 - Descriptive Geometry


    Applications of analytical graphics in solution of engineering and technical design problems. Study of spatial concepts involving points, lines, planes, and solids.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Recommended, IME 1420.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 to 3)
  
  • IME 1500 - Introduction to Manufacturing


    Analysis and application of a broad range of modern manufacturing techniques utilized in industry. Exploration of production methods as influenced by historical impact, materials, processes, productivity, ethics, and social/environmental concerns. The global challenges to product design, performance, quality, and economic considerations will be investigated.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • IME 2010 - Entrepreneurial Engineering I


    This course will introduce students to how engineers can be entrepreneurs. Topics covered will include techniques used in determining the cost of designing, developing, producing and selling a product or service and how these activities relate to entrepreneurial engineering.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • IME 2050 - Work Design


    Design of jobs and work environments in business and industry. Topics include techniques for job design, ergonomics in the workplace, and work measurement. A semester project requiring the design of a work station is required.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: IME 1020 and MATH 1220 or 1700. Corequisite: Recommended, IME 2610.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 3)
  
  • IME 2060 - Engineering Computations


    A basic course introducing students to software and hardware to be used for engineering computations and decision-making. The course includes basics of Internet and Intranet, and use of web browsers for accessing and disseminating information. Instructions also include structured problem solving, basics of flowcharting, logic flow development and basics of a structured programming language.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or 1700. Recommended, CS 1060.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • IME 2100 - Engineering Cost Estimating


    This course will cover engineering cost estimating principles including development of standard costs, development of general overhead and burden rates, and quoting and estimating new jobs.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • IME 2220 - Mobile Energy Sources and Lubricants


    Principles of energy sources, conversion from fuel to propulsion energy, and recovery of kinetic energy. Lubrication used in transportation will also be discussed and tested. The course will identify energy development, processing, transport along with specifications and standard testing procedures. The course will include conventional and alternative fuels as well as advanced power production.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: College writing.

    Credits: 3 hours

 

Page: 1 <- Back 1011 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21Forward 10 -> 28