Apr 22, 2024  
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  • BIOS 4410 - Invertebrate Zoology


    A study of the anatomy, physiology, embryology, and life history of representatives of the major groups of invertebrate animals.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 1510.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
  • BIOS 4420 - Entomology


    This course is a general study of insects, their structure, classification, physiology, life histories, ecological relationships, and economic importance. Students will learn to identify common families of insects and make individual collections.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 1510.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall (alternate years)
  
  • BIOS 4430 - Conservation Biology


    Conservation biology is the science of preserving biodiversity and sustaining the earth. It is a synthetic discipline which draws upon the fields of ecology, evolution, genetics, philosophy, economics, sociology, and political science. This course provides an introduction to conservation biology, and will focus on the earth’s biological diversity, threats to its biological diversity, how threats influence populations and species, and solutions to dealing with those threats.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites:  BIOS 1510 and (BIOS 3010 or ENVS 2250) with a grade of “C” or better.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Spring, Alternate Years
  
  • BIOS 4560 - Tropical Biology


    A travel study course providing an introduction to both terrestrial and marine ecosystems in the tropics. The course, consisting of lectures, field explorations, and individual projects, examines the major life zones and biogeography of the region visited, from an ecological perspective. Tropical Rain, Montane and Dry Forests, and the biology of a coral reef will be studied. Human ecology, agriculture (tropical fruits and vegetables, sugar cane and coffee) and environmental issues will also be included. The course will be presented on one of the islands of the Caribbean and/or in Central America.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Summer I or II
  
  • BIOS 4970 - Senior Seminar: Topic to be specified


    This capstone course integrates a variety of biological concepts within a selected broad topic. The student makes a technical presentation and submits a paper on a selected subject. The student’s record will indicate the nature of the seminar in which he/she has participated. Not repeatable for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Departmental approval required prior to registration.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • BIOS 4980 - Readings in Biological Sciences


    Departmental approval required prior to registration.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • BIOS 4990 - Independent Research in Biological Sciences


    Students may contact a faculty member to conduct research under the guidance of that faculty member. Before the initiation of the research, a literature search and a written experimental plan must be prepared. At the conclusion of the research project, a written report will be submitted to the guiding faculty member. At least three credits of this course can fulfill the departmental capstone course requirement.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Departmental approval required prior to registration.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Spring, and Summer
  
  • BIOS 5120 - Environment and Health Problems


    Human activities impact the environment and environmental factors impact health. Human environment interactions are often not optimal or without cost. In this course we seek sustainable solutions to environment and health problems. May not be taken for credit with BIOS 4970 Senior Seminar with similar topic.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
  
  • BIOS 5180 - Endocrinology


    A survey of the hormonal integration of organ-system function including the chemical nature of these secretions, the cellular and biochemical mechanisms of hormone actions and the endocrine feedback control mechanisms. The regulatory nature of hormones in developmental processes, in adaptation and in disease processes will be stressed.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 3500; biochemistry is recommended.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Spring (alternate years)
  
  • BIOS 5240 - Microbial Genetics


    A lecture/seminar course emphasizing modern microbial genetics, as well as historic keystone experiments. This course focuses on work carried out with bacteria and bacteriophages. Concepts include mutation and selection, recombination and repair, DNA cloning and mutagenesis procedures, regulation of gene expression, differential gene expression in response to environmental stimuli, and genome organizations.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BIOS 3120 Microbiology and BIOS 2500 Genetics.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Fall (alternate years)
  
  • BIOS 5250 - Microbial Ecology


    The objective of this course is to understand the importance of the role and diversity of microorganisms for life on our planet. Students will integrate concepts from various disciplines, including microbiology, ecology, chemistry, geosciences, evolution, genetics, and health sciences. Lecture/seminar format includes computer usage with the web.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BIOS 2320 or 3120 and junior, senior, or graduate student standing.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Fall
  
  • BIOS 5260 - Molecular Biology Laboratory


    This course is designed to expose students to techniques that are currently being used to manipulate and analyze nucleic acids. Student will gain extensive hands-on experience with restriction mapping, ligations, bacterial transformations, eukaryotic gene-replacements, gel electrophoresis, non-isotopic hybridizations, as well as application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Experimental design, use of appropriate controls and handling of acquired data will be stressed.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BIOS 2500 Genetics, BIOS 3120 Microbiology, CHEM 3750 Organic Chemistry I, CHEM 3760 Organic Chemistry Lab I and junior, senior, or graduate student status.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
  
  • BIOS 5265 - Proteins as Biological Machines


    The survey of principles of protein sequence, structure, and biological function. The course will review fundamental aspects of proteins, including evolution of amino acid sequence, structure, function, and biophysical properties such as solubility, stability, interactions with other molecules and catalysis. Individual case studies of model proteins that have medical relevance or applications in diagnostic assays, biopharmaceuticals and nanotechnology, will be presented. This course is approved for the capstone requirement for the Biology and Biomedical Sciences majors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BIOS 1500 and CHEM 1120 and 1130 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Spring
  
  • BIOS 5270 - Cancer Biology


    This course will cover advanced topics in cellular and molecular biology of cancer. Topics to be covered will include oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, cell cycle, and pathology. New and developing treatments for cancer will also be discussed. This course is approved for the capstone requirement for the Biology and Biomedical Sciences majors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequiste: BIOS 1500 or instructor approval. Recommended: CHEM 3550.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Fall, alternate years
  
  • BIOS 5310 - Biology of Aging


    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the aging process. The lectures will emphasize the anatomical, physiological and molecular changes which occur in cells and organs with aging. Clinical applications are introduced where they provide additional insight into the aging process.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BIOS 2400 or 3500.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Fall
  
  • BIOS 5340 - Virology


    This course is designed to provide students with the basic understanding of viruses, their structures and replication strategies. Emphasis is placed on host virus interactions leading to disease processes and cellular alterations in mammalian systems. Viruses are considered as miniature model systems to unify biology at the molecular level. This course is approved to cover the capstone requirement for the Biology and Biomedical Sciences majors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 3120; Biochemistry is recommended.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Spring
  
  • BIOS 5360 - Immunology


    This course is designed to provide students with the basic understanding of the mammalian immune system at cellular and molecular levels. This course also covers the role of the immune system both in health and disease, and explores the applications of immunological concepts in a variety of biological and biomedical sciences.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 3120; Biochemistry is recommended.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Fall
  
  • BIOS 5440 - Global Change Ecology


    The causes and consequences of global climate change will be the focus of this course. We will examine the most recent predictions about the rate and magnitude of global warming, the extent to which human activities are responsible, and the likely consequences for plants, animals, and other components of natural ecosystems, and for agricultural ecosystems and human health. Each topic will include a detailed illustrated outline that summarizes the current evidence, consensus predictions, conclusions, controversies, and uncertainties. The last several weeks will be devoted to additional global change issues, including loss of biodiversity, introduced species, ozone depletion, and acid precipitation. This course is approved to cover the capstone requirement for the Biology and Biomedical Sciences majors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 3010 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Fall, alternate years
  
  • BIOS 5445 - Human Ecology


    Students will examine patterns of distribution and abundance of Homo sapiens and the ecological processes that generate these patterns, through lectures, reading, multi-media, interactive discussion and dissemination of research and understanding. We will also consider the concept of carrying capacity and the dynamics of human population change in relation to the human niche and changing patterns of resource availability. This course is approved to cover the capstone requirement for the Biology and Biomedical Sciences majors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 3010 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Spring, alternate years
  
  • BIOS 5450 - Chemical Ecology


    In this course we will focus on an interdisciplinary appreciation for the ecology of chemically mediated interactions among organisms at different scales of organization from molecules to ecosystems. Students will engage in lectures, reading, multi-media, interactive discussion and hands-on research projects with presentations. This course is approved to cover the capstone requirement for the Biology and Biomedical Sciences majors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 3010 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Spring, alternature years
  
  • BIOS 5455 - Plant-Herbivore Interactions


    Interactions between plants and herbivores provide the foundation processes for most observable ecological patterns. These processes have organized patterns of species diversity through evolutionary history as well as contemporary space. In this class we will examine interactions between plants and herbivores over a wide range of scales, from thrips elephants, that often control the dynamics of other exploitative, competitive and mutualistic processes both within and among trophic levels. The class is interactive with computer simulations, presentations, a grant-writing exercise and discussion of relevant literature. This course is approved to cover the capstone requirement for the Biology and Biomedical Sciences majors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 3010 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Spring, alternate years
  
  • BIOS 5460 - Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution


    Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution is an advanced undergraduate/graduate course designed to provide students with a rigorous exposure to molecular data analysis and literature review. In this course students will learn the principles behind DNA data analysis for evolutionary studies. This will include phylogenetic analyses and studies of molecular evolution. Phylogenetic studies will involve the acquisition of comparative DNA sequence data, sequence alignment, conceptual models of nucleotide substitution, and tree analysis using parsimony,distance, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods of tree inference. For the molecular evolution portion of the course, we will investigate selected examples illustrating the effects of natural selection of DNA sequences. This course is approved to cover the capstone requirement for the Biology and Biomedical Sciences majors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 2500 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Spring, alternate years
  
  • BIOS 5470 - Ornithology


    An introductory course that explores both scientific and popular aspects of bird study. Life history, behavior, ecology, and identification are emphasized.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 1510.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: Junior/Senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology including the specific prerequisite for each course.
  
  • BIOS 5535 - Freshwater Ecology


    This course provides an introduction to the study of interactions between biological communities and their aquatic environments. Lectures and readings introduce the physical, chemical, and biological dynamics of streams, lakes, and wetlands. Emphasis is placed on application of fundamental concepts to problems in conservation and management of aquatic systems and species. Laboratory and fieldwork introduce modern methodological approaches to the study of aquatic ecosystems and the organisms that inhabit them. Two day-long Saturday field trips are required. Field exercises will be conducted largely in local streams, lakes, and wetlands.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 1510 or ENVS 2250.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: All 5000-level courses have the following prerequisites: Junior/senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology, including the specific prerequisite for each course.

    This course is approved to cover the capstone requirement for the Biology and Biomedical Sciences majors.
    When Offered: Fall, alternate years
  
  • BIOS 5590 - Neurobiology


    The substrate of behavior will be examined in this interdisciplinary survey of neural structure and function across molecular, cellular and system levels. There will be a strong emphasis on underlying mechanisms in different animal models. Lecture and discussion will be integrated and supplemented by demonstrations. Topics covered will include: membrane biophysics, synaptic physiology, transduction and signaling in the visual, auditory, chemical and somatosensory systems, reflexes, simple behavior and plasticity.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BIOS 3500; PHYS 1130 & 1140; PHYS 1150 & 1160; CHEM 3550 & 3560 recommended.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Spring
  
  • BIOS 5593 - Biological Basis of Learning and Memory


    Learning and remembering is mediated by the nervous system and is a fundamental biological phenomenon. The ability to change responses as a result of experience seems to be a prominent feature of all nervous systems and is key for organisms to interact with their environments. Indeed, for humans to communicate, think, and be who we are requires that we learn and remember our thoughts and representations. This course will explore an overview of learning and memory research with a focus on the biological bases and include studies at the behavioral level, brain and nerve cell levels as well as the molecular foundations of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie both complex and simple learning. This course is approved to cover the capstone requirement for the Biology and Biomedical Sciences majors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 3500 or permission of instructor. BIOS 5590 or graduate course in Neuroscience recommended.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, alternate
  
  • BIOS 5595 - Biology of Sensory Systems


    This course provides an introduction, discussion and analysis of the anatomy, physiology, molecular biology and disease states of developed sensory systems identified in the human body and other animals. Recent sensory systems articles will be utilized to critique, strengthen student’s scientific reading skills, scientific writing skills and presentation skills. This course is approved to cover the capstone requirement for the Biology and Biomedical Sciences majors.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 2400 or 3500 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Spring
  
  • BIOS 5600 - Toxicology


    Through a lecture/discussion format, the means by which toxicants exert their effects on mammalian, aquatic and ecological systems will be explored. Topics will include bioaccumulation, distribution and excretion of chemicals in the body, the role of metabolism in enhancing or reducing toxicity, mechanisms of toxicity and the effects of toxicants on the major organ systems. Chemodynamic processes which control exposure of organisms will be presented in the context of risk assessment, and the problems inherent in predicting and quantifying risks will be discussed. This course is cross-listed with CHEM 5580.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BIOS 3500; CHEM 3550 & 3560 recommended.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
  • BIOS 5610 - Pharmacology


    The study of the mode of action of drugs in the body. Topics may include, but are not limited to pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, autonomic pharmacology, cardiovascular pharmacology, and renal pharmacology. The course will consist of approximately 50 percent lecture and 50 percent student presentations on selected topics.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BIOS 3500 and CHEM 3750 & 3760.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Spring
  
  • BIOS 5620 - Bioethics


    Bioethics seeks to help students reflect intelligently upon and discuss the nature of modern biology as a science and its impact upon our social and governmental discourse. This occurs through classroom and web based discussions of methods and techniques relevant to applications of Biological Sciences and Biomedical Ethics. We focus on issues that rarely are discussed for fear of offending someone. This includes, but is not limited to, euthanasia, abortion, intelligent design, organ transplants, stem cells, and gene therapy. Students learn to appreciate the complexity of bioethical issues  and the enormity of the responsibility they will carry while providing an unbiased view to the public.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BIOS 1500, BIOS 1510, BIOS 2300, and BIOS 2500; or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Open to Upperclass and Graduate Students. All 5000-level courses have the following prerequisites: Junior/senior standing and at least 12 credits in biology, including the specific prerequisite for each course.
    When Offered: Spring
  
  • BIOS 5700 - General Pathology


    An introduction to pathology which describes the structural and biochemical changes occurring in cells and tissues following injury or disease.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BIOS 3500 and CHEM 3750 and 3760.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Spring (alternate years)
  
  • BIOS 5740 - Developmental Biology


    Developmental biology is the study of the formation of a complex, multicellular organism from a single cell, the fertilized egg. The course will present this material from both a classical description and an experimental cellular point of view. In addition to the lecture, laboratory exercises will provide experience in the recognition of the various stages of development and in the culturing and manipulations of embryos.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BIOS 2500.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Spring
  
  • BIOS 5970 - Topics in Biological Sciences


    Lectures or seminars in various areas of Biological Sciences will be offered. The student’s record will indicate the topic he/she has taken. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Departmental approval prior to registration.

    Credits: 3 to 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
  • BLS 3000 - Application of Travel Instruction for Persons with Cognitive Impairments


    This course is intended to provide an understanding of the specific needs relating to travel for individuals who are cognitively impaired. The focus is on how to best serve this population, how to design an appropriate individualized travel instruction program, and how to effectively implement such a program.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • BLS 3010 - Blindness and Low Vision: An Overview


    It is important for individuals considering entering any field related to human services to be familiarized with services available to persons who are blind or have low vision. Undoubtedly, working in any field related to Human Services or simply living every day life will bring individuals in contact with persons who are blind or have low vision, including problems faced in everyday life, services they receive, skills taught that assist them in functioning as independently as possible, and career opportunities in the field of blindness and low vision.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • BLS 3020 - Ambulatory, Communication, and Information Aids for Travel


    This course will provide knowledge of ambulatory, communication, and information devices that assist independent travel for persons with disabilities. It will provide information about and practice with the use of different types of canes, walkers, wheelchairs, scooters, communication boards, and information such as GPS (global positioning system), Internet maps, talking maps, talking signs, and geographic information systems.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Admission to Travel Instruction program.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • BLS 3050 - Introduction to Adults with Disabilities


    This course is intended to help students understand the impact of disability on the individual, in society, and to understand the contributions that can be made by persons with disabilities when they are accepted members of society. This course will present an overview of various disabilities, the services which have developed to help individuals function independently, and the capabilities of persons with disabilities. The student will gain an overview of medical aspects of disability, the demographics of disability, and issues relating to integration into society. The various components which make up independent functioning in our society will be examined as will the adjustment issues relating to disability.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • BLS 3940 - Foundations of Travel Instruction


    This course is designed to provide the theoretical underpinnings for the evaluation and provision of travel instruction for persons with disabilities. It examines the development of services, the sensory motor requirements, individual development, concepts relating to travel, analysis of the built environment, the systems of transportation available to persons with disabilities, and the professional information needed to provide quality services.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • BLS 3950 - Methods of Independent Travel for People with Disabilities


    This course is the heart of travel instruction. The knowledge provided prepares the practitioner to assess, teach, and monitor travel instruction for persons with disabilities other than blindness. Content in this area is taught through a combination of didactic lecture and experiential practice in the use of equipment and procedures.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • BLS 3960 - Practicum in Independent Travel


    This course will provide students the opportunity to observe travel instruction at an agency or school and to teach travel instruction to a consumer under the direction of an experienced supervisor. It is the purpose of the practicum to prepare students for more extensive training and responsibilities that will take place in BLS 412 Internship in Travel Instruction. In addition to weekly clinical hours, students will attend a weekly lecture class.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Completion of the following BLS courses with a grade of “C” or better: BLS 3000, 3020, 3940, 3950, and 5770.

    Credits: 2 hours

    Notes: Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.
  
  • BLS 4010 - Small “N” Research Design


    This course explores standard group research design, single subject and small numbers design. The emphasis is placed upon providing students with a working knowledge of an experimental methodology for demonstrating control in social/behavioral research where more traditional experimental control group paradigms are not feasible or desirable. This approach is based on an experimental methodology for demonstrating control with single or small numbers of subjects which includes design, internal replication, measurement, reliability, and visual or statistical analysis.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • BLS 4120 - Internship in Independent Travel


    Students will be provided with the opportunity to observe travel instruction at an agency or school and to teach travel instruction to consumers who are cognitively impaired and to consumers who are physically impaired. Outcomes of this course include the ability to develop assessment, planning, and teaching skills.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Completion, with a grade of “C” or better, of BLS 3960 Practicum in Travel Instruction.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.
  
  • BLS 5770 - Services to Individuals with Blindness or Other Disabilities


    This course explores issues that affect services for people who are blind or have other disabilities. It includes prevalence and incidence of various disabling conditions, adaptive recreation, history and current status of service legislation, consumer organizations, professional organizations, accreditation, models of services delivery, national and international agencies and organizations, national and international resources, social service programs, and trends and future issues.

    Credits: 1 to 2 hours

  
  • BLS 5840 - Computer Technology in Rehabilitation


    This course is designed to introduce the student to computer technology as it is related to disabled persons. Students will learn the uses, parts, and operating commands of common adaptive computers, as well as the software used with them. In addition, the major adaptive forms of input and output will be investigated.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • BLS 5860 - Job Development and Placement


    This course applies career choice and job placement concepts to persons with disabilities. It includes occupational aspects of disability, pertinent laws and regulations including ADA and sections 501-504, labor market analysis, job analyses, rehabilitation engineering, job development, and work modification strategies. It provides experience in making employer contacts, overseeing clients’ job seeking efforts, and training in job-related social skills.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • BLS 5880 - Psychosocial Aspects of Disability


    This course provides an understanding of the psycho-social factors that impact upon the integration into society of individuals with disabilities. It examines the philosophy of rehabilitation, major classifications and paradigms, common stereotypes, attitudes and their measurement, psychiatric disabilities, theories of adjustment, psycho-social losses, issues relating to sexuality, personal adjustment training, the role of the family, the use of effective interaction skills, and the stages of group process.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • BLS 5890 - Medical and Functional Aspects of Disability


    This course presents an interdisciplinary approach to the study of multi-handicapping conditions in rehabilitation. It includes information on the major disabling conditions such as traumatic brain injury; orthopedic, neuromuscular, visual, learning, speech and hearing, cardiovascular, mental and emotional disabilities; and other select disabilities. Emphasis is placed upon cumulative effects of concomitant disabilities with additional emphasis on visual impairment.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • BLS 5900 - Physiology and Function of the Eye


    The anatomy, structure, and function of the eye. Various eye diseases and malfunctions are stressed. The student is given an opportunity to observe all types of eye conditions and eye prostheses.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • BLS 5910 - Braille and Tactual Communication Systems


    Provides students with a basic knowledge of the braille literary code–reading and writing, and an overview of other communication methods available to the visually impaired.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • BLS 5920 - Orientation and Mobility with Children


    This course will provide strategies for teaching orientation and mobility to children. Methods for teaching the typical orientation and mobility curriculum to children (indoor travel to business travel) will be presented. In addition, strategies for teaching areas specific to children, such as body image, sensory-motor, and concept development will be addressed. The focus will be on practical application in educational settings.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • BLS 5950 - Introduction to Orientation and Mobility


    The content of this course relates to problems of independent travel which result from reduced vision. Simulated experiences are provided which emphasize the sensory, conceptual, and performance levels needed for independent travel in a variety of environments. Course is repeatable.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Restricted to students in the Orientation and Mobility and Special Education/Orientation and Mobility programs.

    Credits: 2 to 4 hours

  
  • BLS 5960 - Introduction to Electronic Travel Aids


    Systematic instruction in use of fundamental electronic travel aids and overview of major electronic devices.

    Credits: 1 hour

  
  • BLS 5970 - Principles of Low Vision


    This course deals with assessment and remediation of functional problems encountered by low vision persons. Emphasis is placed on optical, non-optical, and electronic aids which increase visual functioning. In addition, the nature and needs of low vision persons and the interprofessional nature of low vision services are stressed. The concepts are explored that deal with initial intake procedures, assessment of near and distant visual acuity, assessment of near and distant visual field, color testing, evaluation of sunwear, evaluation of optical aids, training in the use of optical and non-optical aids, and use of equipment such as the lensometer and tonometer.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Approval of advisor.

    Credits: 2 hours

  
  • BLS 5980 - Readings in Blindness and Low Vision Studies


    Restricted to students in the following curricula: Orientation and Mobility Rehabilitation Teaching, Rehabilitation Counseling and Teaching, and Special Education/Orientation and Mobility.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: BLS students only.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

  
  • BUS 1750 - Business Enterprise


    This course introduces students to the development and value of business institutions in society. Students will examine the dynamics of business decision-making and demonstrate the ability to identify, define, and interpret essential business concepts. The relationships among business activities will be studied to determine their interactions with the economic, political, legal, global, and social environments.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • BUS 2200 - Introduction to Global Business


    An introduction to global business and its complex environment. Factors having an impact on global business including cultural differences, management theories, marketing activities and various legal and financial institutions are examined. Dominant international business policies will also be addressed.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Freshman/sophomore standing only.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Not to be counted toward major/minor in BBA.
  
  • BUS 2700 - Business-Driven Information Technology


    This course provides an introduction to information-communication literacy, system literacy, and business information technologies. It emphasizes the relationship between Information Technology (IT) and business processes and the importance of aligning business information systems with business strategy. By interacting with integrated enterprise system(s), this course helps students understand the modern IT-driven business value chain and business process integration (BPI). The role of IT in organizational change and business transformation, IT history, and IT cultural issues are discussed. Team/individual class projects are used throughout the course.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: (CIS 1020 or CIS 1100 or CS 1000, or CS 1050 or FCS 2250 or MUS 3860 or HPER 1490 or SOC 1820) and (BCM 1420 or ENGL 1050 or IME 1020); sophomore class standing required.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Enrollment is open only to Pre-Business, Business Administration, General Business or Telecommunications and Information Managements majors.
  
  • BUS 3700 - Integrated Communication in Business


    This course is designed to expand students’ understanding of the complexities of oral and written communication in business. Individual and team projects will provide practical experience in the development of effective oral and written communication that reflects upon the students’ ability to analyze an audience, adapt to the audience, and develop persuasive communication strategies reflecting the integration of written, oral, visual, and electronic modes of communication. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which fulfills the University Baccalaureate Writing requirement for BBA degree students.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BUS 2700; junior class standing required.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • BUS 3750 - Business Process Productivity


    This course examines the impact of core business processes on the efficiency and effectiveness of a firm and its supply chain allies. The techniques for the design, implementation, and evaluation of continuous process improvements comprise the body of knowledge. The course uses experiential learning to challenge students to apply the techniques of continuous improvement and innovation to production and service process.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: BUS 2700, MGMT 2500, and STAT 2160; junior class standing required.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • BUS 3900 - Business Internship


    The business internship is designed to provide practical, hands-on business work experience within an organization and may or may noy be related to a business discipline. Internships may or may not be related to the student’s major field of study and are recommended for completion prior to the senior year of academic work. For each credit hour received, students are expected to participate in a minimum of 75 hours of compensated work. Internships must be approved in advance by the Haworth College of Business before credit is awarded. Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis only.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Students must be admitted to the BBA (Business Administration) program.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
  • BUS 3990 - Field Experience (Community Participation)


    A program of independent study combining academic work with social, environmental, civic or political fieldwork.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: A written outline of the student’s project, approved by a faculty supervisor, and approval from the office of the dean.

    Credits: 2 to 8 hours

  
  • BUS 4750 - Strategic Business Solutions


    In this course students identify strategic issues and opportunities facing organizations and develop effective solutions. Students consider and evaluate strategic business alternatives and their implications by focusing on the key business dimensions of information, operations, people, and technology. The successful strategist integrates these four dimensions, sees the organization as a whole, and works proactively to improve organizational performance. this course requires students to learn new concepts as well as integrate prior course work and professional experiences.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ACTY 2110, ECON 2020, MGMT 2500, MKTG 2500, BUS 2700, BUS 3700, (BUS 3750 or MGMT 2800), FIN 3200, LAW 3800 (may be taken concurrently), and senior status.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • BUS 5940 - International Business Seminar


    A foreign study seminar designed for qualified and capable undergraduate students, teachers and business executives. The seminar introduces participants to a firsthand knowledge of business operations abroad through on-site inspection of foreign manufacturing, marketing, financial, and governmental organizations, supplemented by coordinated faculty lectures and assigned readings.  Undergraduate or graduate credit of up to six hours, in one of more the following departments upon consent of the department chair: Accountancy, Business Information Systems, Finance and Commercial Law, Management, or Marketing.

    Credits: 1 to 6 hours

  
  • CCE 1490 - Introduction to Architectural Drawing


    Introduction to the tools and techniques to enable the student to read, compose, and create architectural drawings related to interior design and construction.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 to 3)
  
  • CCE 2310 - Introduction to Civil and Construction Engineering


    Students will develop a working knowledge of the computational technology used by civil and construction engineers. This knowledge will be applied in this course and used extensively in subsequent courses. In addition, students will gain a broad understanding of the types of problems solved by civil and construction engineers.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or 1700.

    Credits: 1 hour

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (1 to 0)
  
  • CCE 2360 - Geomatics


    Spatial data collection methods including surveying, digital photogrammetry and remote sensing, and global positioning systems. Methods and technologies used to manage, manipulate, and analyze spatial and associated attribute data including geographical information systems.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ENGR 1001, 1002, CCE 1490 (or IME 1420), MATH 1220 or 1700.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • CCE 2530 - Civil Engineering Measurements


    Principles and methods for measurement of loads, load effects, environmental variables, and performance of civil engineering systems. Classes integrate lectures and hands-on applications. Exercises provide students with an introduction to sensors, basic electrical circuits, data acquisition systems, and data analysis methods used in civil engineering.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ME 2570 or taken concurrently.

    Credits: 2 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (1 to 2)
  
  • CCE 3080 - Civil and Construction Engineering Materials


    The course focuses on the study of different materials and their applications in Civil and Construction Engineering. Design and control of concrete mixtures will form a major part of the course. Evaluation of physical and mechanical properties of other important construction materials will also be included.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  ME 2570.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • CCE 3300 - Transportation Engineering


    Introduction to transportation engineering with emphasis on highway and airport design. Topics include a survey of various transportation modes for surface, air, and water systems. Emphasis is placed on location and geometric design of highways and airport runways, highway/airport drainage systems, design of rigid and flexible pavement, and pavement testing methods and rehabilitation.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CCE 2360 and IME 2610.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CCE 3330 - Construction Codes, Specifications, and Contracts


    Application of model codes to residential and commercial structures, nonstructural and structural plan review; fire codes, codes governing the installation of the electrical, plumbing and heating elements of the building; inspection techniques; code administration; and introduction to construction contracts.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ME 2570.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • CCE 3350 - Water Resources Engineering


    Survey of principles and practices of water resources engineering, including hydrogeology, hydraulics, water supply and wastewater treatment. Coverage: Descriptive and quantitative hydrology, groundwater, probability concepts in planning, reservoirs, dams, and spillways, open channel flow pumps, engineering economics in water resources planning, irrigation and drainage, water supply systems, wastewater treatment, flood damage mitigation.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ME 3560, IME 3100.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • CCE 3360 - Soil Mechanics


    Mechanical and physical properties of soils and their relation to soil action in problems of engineering, such as classification, permeability, shearing strength, and consolidation.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ME 2570

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 to 2)
  
  • CCE 3860 - Structural Analysis


    Introduction to structural systems; structural requirements; structural systems and specification of loads; analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate structures using equations of equilibrium, moment distribution, and energy methods; determination of design forces in the structural components including shearing force and bending moment diagrams; and brief introduction to the direct stiffness method.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ME 2570.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • CCE 4300 - Traffic Design


    Elements of traffic engineering including traffic flow theory, highway capacity analysis and traffic control systems. Traffic engineering tools and implements including traffic sensor and data systems, parking and traffic accident analysis, freeway traffic management systems and uniform traffic control devices. Application of control measures such as ramp metering systems, actuated signal control systems and traffic impact analysis. Concepts in transportation system management, cost-effectiveness, and public policies.

     

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CCE 3300.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 2)

  
  • CCE 4310 - Construction Planning and Scheduling


    Construction Planning and control of construction projects are discussed. Scheduling techniques such as the critical path method (CPM) and the program evaluation and review technique (PERT) are covered. A scheduling software will be used.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CCE 3380.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • CCE 4340 - Hydraulics


    Measurement, control and conveyance of water flows, analysis, design, characteristics of hydraulic models, instrumentation, pipe systems, pumps and turbines.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CCE 3350.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CCE 4350 - Hydrology


    The hydrologic cycle and its components are described and estimated for specific settings. Concepts are applied to basins at different scales. Man-made modifications such as dams are considered.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CCE 4340 or ME 3560.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
  • CCE 4360 - Construction Estimating, Bidding, and Cost Control


    This course will cover the procedures involved in material quantity takeoffs and in estimation of labor, material, equipment, and overhead costs. Estimating software will be used. The course will also discuss bidding procedures and the elements of construction cost control.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CCE 3330, CCE 3380.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • CCE 4370 - Pavement Design


    Covers pavement design concepts and considerations; engineering properties of pavement materials including soils, bases, asphalt concrete, and Portland cement concrete, design of flexible and rigid pavements.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CCE 3380, CCE 3360, and CCE 3860.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CCE 4380 - Construction Project Management


    Study characteristics of construction industry, project organizations, labor, material, and equipment utilization, construction productivity, value engineering. TQM, constructability, construction safety, contract types, and contract bonds.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CCE 4310, CCE 4360.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • CCE 4400 - Introduction to Structural Design


    Introduction to the process of structural engineering design; response of concrete as structural materials; application of the ACI-318 strength design code; design of beams, columns concrete; principles for designing concrete composite members.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CCE 3380 and CCE 3860.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • CCE 4450 - Design of Steel Structures I


    Design and behavior of structural steel members and their connections subjected to moment, shear, and axial forces. Introduction to the design of steel structures.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CCE 3860.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CCE 4480 - Structural Analysis II


    Analysis of indeterminate structural systems including trusses, frames, and continuous beams using moment distributions, stiffness, and flexibility methods.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CCE 3860.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CCE 4500 - Reinforced Concrete Design II


    Design and behavior of continuous beams, slender columns, two-way floor slabs, flat slab floor systems, and eccentric and combined footing.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CCE 4400.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CCE 4550 - Design of Steel Structures II


    Analysis and design of structural steel components and systems with emphasis on theories necessary for a thorough understanding of the design of complete structures. Compression members affected by local buckling, beams with lateral torsional buckling, continuous beams and beam column connections are covered.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CCE 4400.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CCE 4830 - Project Design and Control


    Problem definition, project planning and scheduling, follow-up and control techniques. Results in presentation and plan for senior project. This course, along with CCE 485, is approved as a writing-intensive course, which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Senior standing.

    Credits: 1 hour

  
  • CCE 4850 - Senior Project


    Open-ended team projects involving systems design, analysis, or application. Results in a tangible system, written report and presentation. This course, along with CCE 483, is approved as a writing-intensive course, which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CCE 4830 and approved project.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 3)
  
  • CCE 4990 - Independent Studies


    An individual study program to supplement regular course work, arranged in consultation with a study supervisor. One to three hours credit per semester.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Consent of department. May be repeated not to exceed six credit hours.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
  • CCE 5300 - Construction Project Delivery Systems


    A comprehensive coverage of the standard contracts between various agencies involved in construction will be described in the course. Analysis of traditional and current project delivery methodologies will also be presented. Issues related to insurance and bonding in the construction industry will be highlighted. Advanced topics such as alternate dispute resolution will also be covered.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CCE 4310 and CCE 4360 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • CCE 5310 - Advanced Construction Project Management


    The course will build on the information that is normally provided to students in the undergraduate construction management courses on planning and control of construction projects. The focus of this course will be to provide the students knowledge of quantitative tools that can be used in planning and controlling construction projects. Topics to be covered will include cash flow forecasting, site planning, site administration, risk analysis, contract documents and contracts administration. Advanced planning tools such as line of balance, velocity diagrams, time-cost trade off, resource planning with applications to construction projects will also be discussed.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CCE 4310 and CCE 4360 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • CCE 5400 - Transportation Planning


    Theoretical foundations of transportation planning, analysis, and evaluation methods. Theory and application of aggregate and disaggregate models for land use, trip generation, and destination, mode, and route choice. Travel demand modeling and transportation network analysis for evaluation of system alternatives.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CCE 3300 or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • CCE 5460 - Design of Timber Structures


    Structural behavior of wood under loads; application of current timber design codes; design of structural components and systems in wood; mechanical properties of wood fasteners and connections.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CCE 3380 and CCE 4400 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (3 to 0)
  
  • CCE 5560 - Foundation Design


    Foundation analysis and design for different civil engineering facilities. High-rise buildings, bridges, and other complex structures such as piles, drilled piers, and caissons. Theoretical aspects of engineered foundations as well as practical applications are discussed.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: CCE 3360 and CCE 4400 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CCE 5610 - Design of Wastewater Systems


    Design of wastewater collection and transport systems. Unit operations in wastewater treatment; physical, chemical, and biological processes for treatment of wastewater; sludge treatment and disposal; design of a wastewater treatment plant; site visits to wastewater treatment plants.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  CHEG 2610 and ME 3560.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: May be repeated for credit.
  
  • CECP 4840 - Community Diversity in Substance Abuse Services


    This course of study will help students to understand diverse cultures and incorporate the relevant needs of culturally diverse groups, as well as people with disabilities, into clinical practice. This course will also examine the ethical topics directly related to diverse populations, such as different strategies of coping and how various cultures view addiction and recovery.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Spring semester
  
  • CECP 5200 - Foundations of Rehabilitation Counseling


    This course surveys the role of the rehabilitation counselor in establishing eligibility, planning services, the tracking system, counseling, case management, work evaluation, work adjustment, supported employment, transition, client assistance programs, job analysis, job development, post-employment, and advocacy. Major emphasis is given to the operation of the state vocational/federal system.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
  • CECP 5830 - Workshops in Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology


    Workshops designed to enhance skill development related to Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology practices. Open to all students, but is not intended for counseling majors. May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

  
  • CHEG 1010 - Introduction to Chemical Engineering


    Introduction to chemical engineering, including process safety, basic laws at the foundation of chemical engineering, units and measurements, chemical equipment and instruments used in the process industries. Emphasis will be on oral and written communication skills and career planning development.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Corequisites: CHEM 1100 and IME 1020 both with a grade of “C” or better (may be taken concurrently).

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
  • CHEG 1810 - Introduction to Chemical Engineering Computation


    An introduction to computer tools used to solve chemical engineering problems. These tools will provide a framework for doing homework, laboratory exercises, and research in later chemical engineering courses. MathCad and Excel with Visual Basic for Applications will be utilized.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: MATH 1180; CHEG 1010 or PAPR 1000.

    Credits: 2 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (1 - 3)
  
  • CHEG 2610 - Environmental Engineering


    The sources, impacts, and management practices for gas, liquid, and solid by-products of natural, industrial, and municipal sources. Legal, ethical and economic implications included in evaluation of applicable emission reduction and emission control techniques and processes will be stressed.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: CHEM 1100

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Will be offered as honors courses for interested students
 

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