May 30, 2023  
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2009-10 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    ENGL 1000 - The Writing Process


    A writing course designed to introduce students to a variety of genres, including narrative, personal, creative, analytic, and argumentative. Focus is on development and improvement in writing process skills that can be applied in all disciplines including grammar and usage, sentence and paragraph development, and organization/focus. Does not count toward English major or minor. Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis. Credit for the course will not apply to the number of credits needed for graduation.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 1050 - Thought and Writing


    A writing course in which the students will work closely with the instructor to develop their sense of language as a means of shaping and ordering their experience and ideas, and to develop imagination, thought, organization, and clarity in their written work. Does not count as credit towards English major or minor. Fulfills the University Intellectual Skills college level writing requirement.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Satisfactory ACT English score, or placement essay, or ENGL 1000.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 1070 - Good Books


    An exploration of good literature, selected from all times and countries experienced in a variety of ways - as fantasy and adventure, as imaginative response to fundamental human experience such as death or evil, as social criticism and analysis, as revelation of character and psychology, as experience of unfamiliar customs and cultures.

    Credits: 4 hours

    Notes: A course for the general student rather than the student who plans to specialize in the study of literature. Credit towards English major or minor by permission of the department only.
    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 1100 - Literary Interpretation


    An introduction to the study of literature, aimed at developing abilities to read literature and write about it with skill, sensitivity, and care. Students will read poetry, drama, and prose fiction, and through the writing of several papers will be introduced to terms and methods of formal study of literature. Course required for entry into most upper-level English courses.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: At least a “B” in ENGL 1050 or the equivalent.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 1120 - Literary Classics


    Readings in selected literary masterpieces from Homer to the present. The works studied are chosen to introduce students to the rich and diverse literary traditions which represent an invaluable aspect of their heritage. Recommended for the general student as well as for potential English majors or minors; does not, however, count for English major or minor credit.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    ENGL 1500 - Literature and Other Arts


    Study of literature through its relationship to other arts. The course approaches literature by relating novels, stories, poems, or plays to their representations in other media and art forms, particularly film (including TV), music and song, dramatic representation, and painting.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 2050 - Intermediate Writing


    A practical course for freshman or sophomores or international students transferring to Western, who wish to develop their skills in writing. Emphasis is on understanding the conventions and forms appropriate for personal writing, persuasion, and/or research papers and reports. May count as elective credit in English. May not count toward an English major or minor. This course will not fulfill the baccalaureate writing requirement.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of ENGL 1050.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 2070 - Topics in Literature


    Course description varies. May be repeated for credit under different topics.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 2100 - Film Interpretation


    Studies in the motion picture as art form.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
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    ENGL 2110 - Folklore and Mythology


    Exploration of folklore and mythology from around the world and through the ages using poetry, fiction, film, and other materials.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    ENGL 2220 - Literatures and Cultures of the United States


    Through study of literary works (and, when possible, other artistic achievements or cultural artifacts) by members of the varied cultures which comprise the United States of America, this course considers the perspectives and sustaining values of these cultural groups and considers the challenges, problems, and opportunities of a pluralistic American society.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
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    ENGL 2230 - African American Literature


    A survey of important African American writers and the historical development of the African American image and experience in American literature and culture.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II
  
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    ENGL 2520 - Shakespeare


    A survey of Shakespeare’s art through study of selected tragedies, histories, and comedies.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 (Theatre majors may substitute THEA 1700).

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 2660 - Writing Fiction and Poetry


    Study and practice in writing of fiction and poetry, intended to develop the student’s understanding of formal techniques and skill in the use of these techniques.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
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    ENGL 3050 - Practical Writing


    A practical course for juniors and seniors who wish to develop their skills in writing. Emphasis is on understanding the writing forms of non-fictional prose such as research papers and reports; personal writing, and pre-professional writing (for students planning careers in business, social service, industry, law, the arts, or other professions). This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum. This course is available only to English Majors and English Minors or by permission of the department.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
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    ENGL 3070 - Literature in Our Lives


    This course examines the ways that literary works represent and reflect upon human experience and the human condition. It emphasizes the response of the individual reader to both the intellectual content and the aesthetic properties of texts and seeks to develop critical standards as a basis for a life-long engagement with literature; does not count as credit toward English major or minor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 3080 - Quest for Self


    Exploration of the perennial quest for the self through the special perspective provided by literature. The literary perspectives may be supplemented by materials from other arts or disciplines. A non-technical course for the general student rather than the student specializing in the study of literature; does not count as credit towards an English major or minor.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 3110 - Our Place In Nature


    Exploration of the human’s place in nature through the special perspective provided by literature. The literary perspectives may be supplemented by materials from other arts or disciplines. A non-technical course for the general student rather than the student specializing in the study of literature; does not count as credit towards an English major or minor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    ENGL 3120 - Western World Literature


    Study of works selected from the Western literary tradition, excluding those from Great Britain and the U.S.A. Selections may range from biblical literature and great works of Greece and Rome through classics of the Middle Ages and Renaissance to major works of the present. Works will be studied in English.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3130 - Asian Literature


    Study of works selected from the great literature of Asia, especially the Chinese, Japanese, and Indian traditions. Works will be studied in English.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3140 - African Literature


    Study of works selected from the great literature of Africa, including both traditional and contemporary material. Works will be studied in English.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3150 - The English Bible as Literature


    Study of selections from the Old and New Testaments and the Apocrypha. Some attention will be given to the influence of the English Bible on a few representative writers, musicians, and artists, but emphasis will be on the poetic, philosophical, and narrative elements of the Bible itself.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3200 - American Literature I


    A survey of American literature from its beginnings to 1880, with attention to the diversity of American cultures.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ENGL 1050 (or equivalent); ENGL 1100.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
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    ENGL 3210 - American Literature II


    A survey of American literature since 1880, with attention to the diversity of American cultures.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ENGL 1050 (or equivalent); ENGL 1100.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
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    ENGL 3300 - British Literature I


    A survey of British literature from its beginnings through Boswell.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ENGL 1050 (or equivalent); ENGL 1100.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3310 - British Literature II


    A survey of British literature from the Romantics to the present.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ENGL 1050 (or equivalent); ENGL 1100.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3600 - Achieving in Academic English: Emphasis on Reading


    This course is for undergraduates and graduates who are non-native speakers of English and who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their reading and writing skills in order to perform successfully in their academic world. The course promotes further development in the ability to read academic prose and to write in the genres needed for academic success, including the research paper. Attention will be paid to critical reading and editing for grammatical correctness in writing.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Minimum of 500 on TOEFL.

    Credits: 5 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3610 - Developing Proficiency in English: Emphasis on Speaking and Listening


    For international students whose interpersonal speaking and listening skills are satisfactory, this course promotes further development of oral language abilities needed for academic success, including group interaction skills. Attention will be paid to developing critical listening and oral presentation skills.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Minimum of 500 on TOEFL.

    Credits: 5 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3620 - Readings in Creative Non-Fiction


    A course in literary analysis of the form and development of the non-fiction prose. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ENGL 1050; ENGL 1100.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 3660 - Advanced Fiction Writing


    An advanced course in the writing of fiction, with emphasis on class discussion and criticism of each student’s writing. May be repeated one time for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGL 2660 or permission of the department.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
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    ENGL 3670 - Advanced Poetry Writing


    An advanced course in the writing of poetry, with emphasis on class discussion and criticism of each student’s writing. May be repeated one time for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGL 2660 or permission of the department.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
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    ENGL 3680 - Playwriting


    An introductory course in the writing of drama, with class discussion and criticism of each student’s writing, and including study of selected examples of drama in print and in production. May be repeated one time for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGL 2660 or permission of the department.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3690 - Writing in the Elementary School


    Focuses on writing development of pre-school through middle school children, and on ways one can encourage and respond to student writing, assess writing growth, and use writing as a means of learning. Fosters a theoretical understanding of the writing process in part by writing in varied genres and forms. Emphasizes writing as an integral component of the entire curriculum.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II
  
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    ENGL 3700 - Writing Creative Non-Fiction


    An introductory course in the writing of creative non-fiction, with class discussion and criticism of each student’s writing, and including study of selected examples of creative non-fiction in print. May be repeated one time for credit.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ENGL 2660 or ENGL 3050 or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
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    ENGL 3710 - Structures of Modern English


    Examines the structures of the English language and surveys major grammatical theories. Emphasizes syntactic analysis of oral and written English to develop an understanding of the diversity of forms, meanings, and stylistic choices available in the language.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3720 - Development of Modern English


    Traces the development of modern English from its beginnings to the present, examining historic and linguistic influences on change in both spoken and written English. Explores theories of language development, with emphasis on their practical implications.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3730 - Reading As A Psycholinguistic Process


    Focuses on the nature of the reading process and the development of reading ability in children. Particular attention is given to how the natural acquisition of literacy parallels the acquisition of oral language, and to the close relationship between the development of reading and writing ability. Emphasizes the application of current research in the elementary classroom.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 3740 - Language in the Elementary School


    This course will deal with the following topics: the history and structure of words, dialects, and interlanguage (i.e., lingua franca, a common language used by speakers of different languages) as cultural phenomena; teaching reading and writing in light of language variations; aspects of grammar most useful to writers; research on teaching grammar; and integrating language study into the elementary curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGL 3690

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3770 - Language and Learning in Multilingual Classrooms


    This course deals with second language acquisition, both oral and written, as a foundation for understanding how the learning of English can be fostered by elementary classroom teachers when content, language, and literacy are taught and learned together. The course emphasizes strategies for teaching students with limited English proficiency while immersing them in literacy-rich classrooms with an integrative inquiry approach to learning.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGL 3690

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3820 - Literature for the Young Child


    An exploration of human and literary values in the best of children’s works for the very young through age nine. Emphasis is on critical sensitivity and techniques necessary for interpreting and evaluating works representative of the major forms of children’s literature. Discussion will focus on how literature is first learned through adult-child interaction and how interaction creates changes that are influenced by time period and culture as well as the personal dynamics inherent in the oral tradition. Visual reading through picture books will be examined as well as the evaluation of good picture book literature. Developmental issues related to a child’s reading capability and narrative skills will be considered through an examination of transitional reader (chapter books) and novels. Poetry, both in its oral form and its written form, will be considered as will be mythology and folklore: its versions, variants, and adaptations (both in book and film form).

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 or sophomore status.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
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    ENGL 3830 - Literature for the Intermediate Reader


    An exploration of human and literary values in the best of children’s works for preadolescents. Emphasis is on critical sensitivity and techniques necessary for interpreting and evaluating works representative of the major forms of children’s literature for the older reader. Discussion will focus on narrative forms and on how the more experienced reader comes to prose and poetry. Novels will be explored both in terms of literary structure and content and in terms of what makes a piece of literature work for children. Genres such as historical fiction, realistic fiction, nonfiction, fantasy, and survival literature will be considered. Ever growing complexity in structure and content will be evaluated as they relate to child’s biological, psychological, and mental development, and in the context of cultural and historical change. How media influence literature will be explored as well as the changing population of child-readers and what that means for book production.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 or sophomore status.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 3840 - Adolescent Literature


    This course focuses on an analysis of literature for adolescents from a variety of critical and culturally diverse perspectives. It emphasizes the adolescent experience as reflected in literature, the history of adolescent literature and media, and the distinguishing features of classical and contemporary works.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGL 1100.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 4100 - Special Topics in Literature


    A study in historical perspective of selected literary works of the English speaking world or international literature in translation. May be repeated for credit as long as the topics are different.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGL 1100.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 4150 - Literary Theory and Criticism


    An introduction to the theory and methods of literary criticism. Readings may be drawn from the history of critical theory or from modern and contemporary schools of criticism. Strongly recommended for all English majors, especially those planning to pursue graduate study. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: At least two upper-divison English courses.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 4160 - Women in Literature


    A study of literature of different periods and cultures to identify the images of women and to interpret the search for self as experienced by women protagonists and women writers.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGL 1100.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 4400 - Studies in Verse


    A historical and formal study of poetry, emphasizing the development of poetic techniques, major verse forms and styles, and their relation to theories of poetry. Attention shall be paid to the critical and theoretical bases of interpretation. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Two courses at the 3000-level that count toward English major.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 4420 - Studies in Drama


    Studies in the major styles and forms of drama. Attention shall be paid to the critical and theoretical bases of interpretation. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Two courses that count toward the English major at the 3000-level.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 4440 - Studies in the Novel


    The study of the development and diversity of the novel as a literary form. Emphasis will be on the novel from the eighteenth- to the early twentieth-century. Attention shall be paid to the critical and theoretical bases of interpretation. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Two courses that count toward the English major at the 3000-level.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I
  
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    ENGL 4520 - Shakespeare Seminar


    Intensive study of selected aspects of Shakespeare’s poetic and dramatic art. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 or 2520.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 4620 - Advanced Writing


    Practice in writing articles, essays, biographical and critical prose, with emphasis on development of the student’s individual style and elimination of obstacles to clear and vital expression.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 4640 - Professional Writing


    Practice in developing the forms and techniques of writing, editing, and researching required in business, industry, and government. Students should take this course as their capstone experience in practical writing.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Two writing courses.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 4720 - Language Variation in American English


    A study of regional and social varieties of American English from sociolinguistic perspectives, focusing on the forces which influence different types of language variation. Examines issues of linguistic bias, and offers a multi-cultural perspective on the role of language in daily life.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 4790 - Writing in the Secondary School


    Focuses on the continued development of student writers in grades 7 to 12, and on ways one can encourage and respond to student writing, assess writing growth, and use writing as a means of learning. Fosters a theoretical understanding of the writing process, in part by writing in varied genres and forms. Emphasizes writing as an integral component of the entire curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: Two 3000-level English courses that count toward the major.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II
  
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    ENGL 4800 - Teaching Literature in the Secondary Schools


    A study of techniques and theories of teaching literature to young adults. Does not count as credit toward the major.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ED 3020 Teaching and Learning in the Secondary School and two 3000-level English courses that count toward the major.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer I, Summer II
  
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    ENGL 4840 - Multi-Cultural American Literature for Children


    A course designed to develop an understanding of the cultural diversity of the American experience through multi-cultural oral and written literature for young people. Attention will be paid to developing criteria for selecting and evaluating literature which reflects diversity within the American heritage.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: 16 hours of course work in English, including ENGL 3820 or 3830.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 4950 - Internship/Field Work


    Open to juniors and seniors with a 3.0 GPA, this course enables advanced students to gain practical writing experience in the working world while earning academic credit. Specific arrangements are made in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. May be repeated; no more than four hours total credits.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Writing majors or minors.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 4960 - English Honors Seminar


    Special studies in selected topics. Open only to majors working for honors in English, or by permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 4970 - Studies in English: Variable Topics


    Group study of special topics in literature, film, English language, and writing. Many of these special courses are organized around special events or speakers on campus or in the community, or in response to special needs or interests of students. Some topics are announced in the schedule of classes; some are added during the semester. Further information and full listing of topics may be obtained from the English Department, sixth floor Sprau Tower.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 5220 - Studies in American Literature


    Study of a movement or a recurrent theme in American literature, such as romanticism, realism, naturalism, humor, racial issues.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: The prerequisites to 5000-level courses are: 18 hours of English courses, including eight or more hours at the 3000- 4000-level, and second semester junior status; exemption only by permission of Director of Undergraduate Studies
  
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    ENGL 5300 - Medieval Literature


    Readings in the medieval literary tradition. Some Middle English works will be studied in the original; works in Old English and continental literature will be mainly in translation.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    ENGL 5320 - English Renaissance Literature


    Readings in representative writers of the period 1500-1660.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 5340 - Restoration and 18th-Century Literature


    British Literature 1660-1800. Readings in representative writers of the period, focusing on the diversity of literary forms in the period.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 5360 - Romantic Literature


    Readings in poetry and criticism, with emphasis on such writers as Blake, Burns, Dorothy Wordsworth, William Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Mary Shelley, P.B. Shelley, and Keats.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 5370 - Victorian Literature


    Readings emphasizing such writers as Carlyle, Mill, Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, Tennyson, Robert Browning, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Arnold.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 5380 - Modern Literature


    Readings in representative writers in the period 1890-1945, not exclusively in British and American literature.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 5390 - Post-colonial Literature


    Readings in representative writers from colonial and post-colonial cultures.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 5400 - Contemporary Literature


    Readings in representative writers who have come to prominence chiefly since 1945.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 5550 - Studies in Major Writers


    Study of the works of classical, European, British or American writers. Limited to one or two authors.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 5660 - Creative Writing Workshop


    A workshop and conference course in the writing of poetry, fiction, or drama, with emphasis on refinement of the individual student’s style and skills. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Six hours of creative writing, graduate standing, or permission of the department.

    Credits: 4 hours

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGL 5740 - Grammar in Teaching Writing


    Dealing with issues and methods in the teaching of grammar, this course for teachers focuses on using grammar to develop content, style and voice, and skill in revising and editing writing. Prerequisites: 18 hrs of English course work, including 8 or more hours at the 3000- or 4000-level, and second semester junior status.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENGL 5750 - Icelandic Sagas in Translation


    Readings in medieval Icelandic literature. This class provides students an opportunity to explore medieval Iceland through its rich mythology, literature, and culture. No previous coursework required in either Old Norse/Icelandic or medieval literature.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 5760 - Introduction to Old Norse


    An introduction to the fundamentals of Old Norse grammar and language. By translating prose and poetry, students will develop an appreciation of the literature and culture of medieval Iceland as well as a reading knowledge of Old Norse.

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Fall - every other year
  
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    ENGL 5770 - Advanced Readings in Old Norse


    A review of the fundamentals of Old Norse grammar and language learned in ENGL 5760 by focusing on longer selections from sagas and poems. This class will further students’ knowledge of the language and the literature through discussion of them.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  ENGL 5760

    Credits: 3 hours

    When Offered: Spring - every other year
  
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    ENGL 5820 - Studies in Children’s Literature


    A study in depth of significant themes, movements, types in children’s literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 3820 or 3830 or permission of the department.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 5830 - Multi-Cultural Literature for Adolescents


    Critical analyses of literature read by young adults, with special attention paid to American and world literatures that reflect the diversity of the increasingly global community.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 5970 - Studies in English: Variable Topics


    Group study of special topics in literature, film, English language, and writing. Many of these special courses are organized around special events or speakers on campus or in the community, or in response to special needs or interests of students. Some topics are announced in the schedule of classes; some are added during the semester. Further information and full listing of topics may be obtained from the English Department, sixth floor Sprau Tower.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

  
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    ENGL 5980 - Readings in English


    Individual reading project available to advanced students by special permission from the appropriate departmental advisor (undergraduate or graduate) and the staff member who will supervise the study. Normally, permission is granted only to students who have well thought-out projects dealing with authors or materials not being covered currently in the schedule. Permission is usually not granted to students who want to use the course simply to get one or two hours credit to complete an English major or minor.

    Credits: 1 to 4 hours

  
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    ENGR 1001 - Introduction to Engineering Design


    An introduction to engineering design process and the engineering and engineering technology disciplines. Topics include engineering design process, teamwork, written and oral communications, engineering ethics, and impact of engineering solutions on society.

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall
  
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    ENGR 1002 - Introduction to Engineering Analyses


    Introduction to Engineering Analyses and exploration of the career opportunities and demands of the engineering and engineering technology professions. Topics include problem-solving, using computer spreadsheet program for engineering analyses, teamwork, communications, and career opportunities and demands of the engineering and engineering technology professions.

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Spring
  
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    ENGR 1990 - Engineering Mathematics


    Application of mathematics to introductory engineering problems. Topics include mechanical and electrical engineering applications using: algebra and trigonometry, vectors, sinusoids and harmonic function, systems of equations and matrices, simple derivatives and integrals, and simple linear differential equations.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  ACT Math score for placement in MATH 1180 or equivalent or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Lecture Hours - Laboratory Hours: (2 - 3)
  
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    ENGR 2020 - Service Learning Engineering Design I


    Using the engineering design process to complete a service learning design project. Students will be part of a project team working to provide materials, activities, and training for teaching Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) topics in K-12 school settings, or to meet other identified educational needs in the local community.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: IME 1020; or ID 2430 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGR 2980 - Parallel Cooperative Education and Internship


    A parallel cooperative education program or insternship involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student’s major during a semester. A written report of the student’s work activities will be required.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  Sophomore standing or approval of the Director of Cooperative Education.

    Credits: 1 - 3 hours

    Notes: Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.
    May be elected two semesters.
    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGR 2990 - Alternating Cooperative Education


    An alternating cooperative education program involves full-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student’s major during a semester. A written report of the student’s work activities will be required.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  Sophomore standing and approval of the Director of Cooperative Education.

    Credits: 1 - 3 hours

    Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be classified as having full-time student status for the purpose of loan deferments and insurance eligibility. Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.
    May be elected two semesters.
    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGR 3030 - Service Learning Engineering Design II


    Continuation of ENGR 2020 with increasing responsibilities related to defining the project, interactions with clients, project management, and analysis of multiple design solutions.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: (ID 2470 and Junior standing), or (ENGR 2020 and Junior standing), or instructor approval.

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGR 3400 - Engineering Global Practices in Non-Western Countries


    This course is designed to help students develop the necessary skills to allow them to interpret and understand non-western cultures and enable them to successfully work in a global industry. Design, business, manufacturing, problem solving, quality control, and supply chain management developed in non-western countries will be observed and studied. Theories, practices, copyright and patent protection, research protocol review boards, political practices, etc., will be examined. Discussions will include alternative views of engineering and modern technology to stimulate reflections on their characteristics from a global perspective.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  Sophomore standing.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Pre-visit orientation will be held to provide introduction to culture and language of the host country.
    When Offered: Summer I and II
  
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    ENGR 3700 - Engineering Global Practices in Western Countries


    This course is designed to help students develop the necessary skills to allow them to interpret and understand other western cultures and enable them to successfully work in a global industry. Design, business, manufacturing, problem solving, quality control, and supply chain management developed in other western countries will be observed and studied. Theories, practices, copyright and patent protection, research protocol review boards, political practices, etc., will be examined. Discussions will include alternative views of engineering and modern technology to stimulate reflections on their characteristics from a global perspective.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  Sophomore standing.

    Credits: 3 hours

    Notes: Pre-visit orientation will be held to provide introduction to culture and language of the host country.
    When Offered: Summer I and II
  
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    ENGR 3980 - Parallel Cooperative Education and Internship


    A parallel cooperative education program or internship involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student’s major during a semester. A written report of the student’s work activities will be required.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  Junior standing.

    Credits: 1 - 3 hours

    Notes: Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.
    May be elected two semesters.
    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGR 3990 - Alternating Cooperative Education


    An alternating cooperative education program involves full-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student’s major during a semester. A written report of the student’s work activities will be required.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  Junior standing and approval of the Director of Cooperative Education.

    Credits: 1 - 3 hours

    Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be classified as having full-time student status for the purpose of loan deferments and insurance eligibility. Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.
    May be elected two semester.
    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENGR 4040 - Service Learning Engineering Design III


    Continuation of ENGR 3030 with increasing responsibilities related to defining a project, interactions with clients, project management, project budgeting, and analysis and evaluation of multiple design solutions.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: (ID 4330 and Junior standing), or (ENGR 3030 and Junior standing), or instructor approval.

    Credits: 1 hour

    When Offered: Fall, Spring
  
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    ENVS 1100 - Nature and Society


    This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of environmental studies designed for majors and minors in the program. Through a survey of environmental topics, students will examine changing human relationships to the nonhuman world, diverse approaches to environmental problems, and environmental literature from the humanities to the sciences. The course is reading and writing intensive, and also includes a required weekend camping trip.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENVS 2150 - Environmental Systems and Cycles


    This course presents an overview of the fundamental physical, biological, and geochemical processes governing the movement of energy and matter in the environment, and the constraints imposed by these natural systems on human activities. Topics include the properties and use of energy resources, synthetic chemical and their biological effects, the chemistry of natural and polluted water, food production and population, acid rain, ozone depletion, and global climate change.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: [ENVS 1100 or ENVS 3000 or GEOG 1000] and [CHEM 1000 or CHEM 1100 or GEOS 1000 or GEOS 1300].

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENVS 2250 - Environmental Ecology


    This course focuses upon the study of living systems of various sizes and degrees of complexity. Emphasis is on how individual organisms, natural populations, biotic communities, and ecosystems vary, how they are interconnected, and how human activities influence the complex interrelationships within and among them.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: [ENVS 1100 or ENVS 3000 or GEOG 1000] and [BIOS 1120 or BIOS 1510].

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENVS 2260 - Field Environmental Ecology


    An introduction to the major natural ecosystems of southwest Michigan, and modern ecological methods used in their study. Exercises and activities will be conducted largely in the field, primarily at the Pierce Cedar Creek Institute. Course content will complement lecture material presented in ENVS 2250.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENVS 2250 or concurrent enrollment.

    Credits: 1 hour

  
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    ENVS 3000 - Environment, Technology, and Value


    An introduction to the physical and biological bases of the environment and the historical, anthropological relation of Homo Sapiens within those parameters, the impacts of the rise of modern industrial societies and human populations with an examination of the driving values causing and caused by these developments, the environmental movement and the alternative projected futures. At the discretion of a program advisor, ENVS 3000 may be substituted for ENVS 1100 for those students wishing to take an environmental studies major or minor. Students may not enroll in ENVS 3000 after successfully completing ENVS 1100.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENVS 3200 - Major Environmental Writings


    This course uses selected readings of classical works in the environmental field, together with current works of significant import, to introduce students to the wisdom and the variety of voices speaking on behalf of the environment and environmentally responsible courses of human action. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite:  ENVS 1100 or ENVS 3000 or GEOG 1000.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENVS 3400 - Environmental Policy


    This course explores why environmental policy is necessary and how environmental policy has been made, is being made, and might in the future be made in the United States. The emphasis is on environmental policy and regulation at the national level, but regional, state, and local approaches/initiatives will also be considered. In addition to considering the policy process (the how), we will also review the state of environmental policy (legislation and effectiveness) and explore the policy evaluation process (the tools and techniques policy makers use to make better decisions - cost-benefit analysis, risk analysis, and environmental impact assessment). A substantial part of the course will also be devoted to considering emerging alternatives that are based on the principles of sustainability and the challenges involved in institutionalizing them.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ENVS 1100 or ENVS 3000 or GEOG 1000 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 4 hours

  
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    ENVS 3600 - Environment and Culture


    A global cross-cultural exploration of human-environment interactions. This course will examine a variety of different technological/economic systems ranging from small-scale foraging and horticultural societies to large-scale, complex and stratified societies. Special themes each semester will address different environmental problems and how they have been solved - or not - historically and contemporarily. Such themes might address: the origins and contemporary dimensions of the population debate, the role of “values” in sustainable societies, or controversies between indigenous peoples and environmentalists.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ENVS 1100 or ENVS 3000 or GEOG 1000 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENVS 4010 - Selected Environmental Topics


    An intensive, focused study of an environmental topic such as solid waste management and resource recovery, energy management, environmental law, or environmental communications. Topic to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. This course may be repeated for credit with a second topic.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisites: ENVS 2150, ENVS 3200, ENVS 3400, ENVS 3600 and [ENVS 2250 or BIOS 3010] or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENVS 4100 - Appropriate Technologies and Sustainability


    In the light of the debates on sustainability, the course analyzes how technologies and technological systems have interacted with and influenced social change in both industrial countries and the Third World. Criteria for assessing the appropriateness and sustainability of various technologies and technological systems in different settings will be discussed and mini-assessments will be conducted.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENVS 1100 or ENVS 3000 or GEOG 1000 or instructor approval.

    Credits: 3 hours

  
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    ENVS 4200 - Internship


    The environmental internship gives students the opportunity to gain practical experience in a particular area of environmental activity, and to work with professionals. Students will gain “hands on” knowledge and add an important non-academic dimension to their resumes.

    Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: Approval of a program advisor.

    Credits: 1 to 3 hours

 

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